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Messages - AlisaGreenstein

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11
Law School Applications / Re: Would you call?
« on: February 11, 2009, 04:12:34 PM »
I would suggest that you refrain from calling at this point.  The call will not improve your chances at this point so it has the potential to do more harm than good.  I know it is difficult but try and wait for a while.  If you still haven't heard anything after a long period of time (which probably won't occur), then you can contact them as politely as possible to see if they "require any additional information."  Good luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law   

12
Personal Statement / Re: Diversity Essay
« on: February 11, 2009, 04:03:07 PM »
This is a tough issue - Cardozo asks for this.  My suggestion is to use the opportunity to show how you are unique.  If it is not because of ethnic background, religion or something along those lines, then concentrate on how you pursued a path that was different from what your background/parents/upbringing expected from you and how it has made you a stronger individual.  You might also choose to discuss choosing a unique major to study, i.e. a math major who wants to go to law school, or other rare life experience.  This is your opportunity to show the school what you can bring to their institution that is different from what other students can bring.  Good luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

13
I think Nick's recommendations were excellent.  You definitely want to accentuate the positive as much as possible in this instance, rather than the negative, and the best way to do that is to show how you have learned from the experience and it has made you a better person.  And, if you really enjoyed the community service, or got something else out of that, you can also highlight the positive there.  You also want to keep it as short as possible so you don't give the committee that much material with which it can find fault.  You did the best your could with this situation and I hope it works out for you in the end.  Good luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

14
It can be frustrating when people reading your personal statements only give you negative feedback rather than constructive criticism.

I think you definitely have something on which you can build a great statement.  You might want to use your personal statement to show the committee how you have overcome a negative experience and it has helped you to reaffirm your desire to pursue a career in law. You always want to use the opportunity to emphasize your strengths whenever possible, to emphasize the skills you have gained along the way and how confident you are that you will use those skills to make a contribution to the law school.  While you can describe bad things that have happened in the past, don't accentuate them as much as the central theme of the statement, which should be how you have turned such experiences into your driving force to do x or y and that law school will help you do that.  Best of luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

15
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Logical Reasoning question-by-question guide
« on: February 05, 2009, 11:45:59 AM »
I would go through practice exams and try to make these kinds of lists (e.g., all must be true questions) on your own.  The exercise of figuring out what types of questions you need to work on, and intensely focusing on those, can help you get more familiar with these questions and will only help you improve. Best of luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law   

16
Sounds like you have already gotten some good advice.

It is never a bad idea to practice on old questions because there is no such thing as bad practice for the LSAT but the exam has gotten harder in recent years so you want to make sure to also practice on new questions as much as possible.  Also whenever relying on a commercial company's books, remember that not all of their strategies work for all people.  Find out which techniques work best for you and continue to use those.  Never underestimate the importance of carefully reading the questions and paying particular attention to word choice.  Finally, to the extent you can determine the answer on your own, BEFORE you get to the answer choices, you will be less distracted by the irrelevant answer choices that are always there.  Best of luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

17
Studying for the LSAT / Re: SuperPrep or PowerScore Bibles first?
« on: February 05, 2009, 11:36:32 AM »
There is no substitute for practice on real, authentic LSAT practice exams.  I would take one full-length practice test under timed conditions and see how you do.  Make a list of the question types that you seem to continue to get wrong and concentrate on finding techniques that help target those areas and work best for YOU.  Not all of the techniques that these commercial companies list in their books work for everyone.  Once you can get your accuracy up, then try to do more timed exams, so you can improve your score as well.  I would also recommend purchasing more recent LSAT exams online, since the logic games have been getting harder in the past year.  Best of luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law 

18
Studying for the LSAT / Re: october 09 lsat
« on: January 28, 2009, 03:53:02 PM »
There is no substitute for practing on real, official LSAT exams.  Order as many as you can on Amazon or elsewhere online, including the most recent ones from 2008.  I always tell my students to try to devote at least an hour and a half on weeknights to studying and to use one weekend day for a full-length practice exam under timed, test-taking conditions.  You want to make sure you can get through a full exam under the alloted time and then you want to make sure you can get as many right as possible! If you start to notice that you are having problems with the same types of questions, try and focus on those and if you don't understand why you are getting questions wrong, be sure and try to find help from a tutor or a class so that you won't make those mistakes again.  Best of luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

19
Studying for the LSAT / Re: My LSAT strategy for June 09, critique
« on: January 28, 2009, 03:44:12 PM »
It sounds like you have a great game plan.  My only suggestions are to: (1) make sure that you take your practice exams under truly timed conditions with no distractions, (2) once you figure out what questions you are getting wrong, spend a couple of days just focusing on those types of questions, and (3) definitely order the new 2008 exams with which to practice.  The October and December 2008 Logic Games were considerably harder than the previous years and if that is any indication of what is to come, you want to make sure you are prepared for the hardest games they can throw at you.  Best of luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

20
Recommendations / Re: academic vs work experience LOR
« on: January 28, 2009, 03:33:55 PM »
There is no need to ask a current employer for a letter of recommendation if you are afraid it might adversely affect your position with that employer.  However, that being said, if there is another employer you worked with during college or a more recent summer job who can provide a glowing recommendation, that might provide a little more diversity to your package. Good luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

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