Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.

Messages - AlisaGreenstein

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7
1
LSAC and LSDAS / Re: small mistake on application
« on: February 26, 2009, 05:02:57 PM »
I would strongly recommend that you send a small addendum to correct the error.  This will also show the school that you are a thorough individual!  Best of luck!




2
LSAC and LSDAS / Re: Electronic App Question
« on: February 26, 2009, 05:01:19 PM »
It sounds like you have already received some great advice.  If you are concerned about meeting the deadline or have any additional questions, you can definitely call LSDAS or the schools directly and see what they suggest.  There is usually some delay before LSDAS can distribute all of your materials. Best of luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

3
LSAC and LSDAS / Re: Money
« on: February 26, 2009, 04:58:19 PM »
Definitely don't let lack of financial resources be an obstacle to your goal of pursuing a law school education! I suggest you contact the financial aid offices of the law schools in which you are interested right away and see what concrete steps they suggest you take.  There are also lots of other scholarships available privately, start searching online and see what you can find.  Prior to the actual law school admissions process, you should also try and study for the LSAT on your own.  You can order the old tests online for a reasonable cost and if you do get above 175s on your practice exams, then you can probably forego the costs of a tutor or an LSAT test.  Best of luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

4
Personal Statement / Re: Need Help Deciding on Essay Topic...
« on: February 26, 2009, 04:52:51 PM »
I think a personal statement about growing up with Holocaust survivors has the potential to be a very powerful and very meaningful personal statement.  You don't have to discuss why it made you want to go to law school necessarily but could use the opportunity to distinguish yourself as being a unique candidate because of your unique background, which is always a good idea.  I think you can emphasize how it has impacted other areas of your life and made you consider U.S. government actions/responses and those of other governments more seriously, particularly given the fact that so many groups have tried to deny the existence of the Holocaust.  I think you could really set yourself apart from others if you discuss how this has had both an emotional and philosophical impact on the rest of your life.  Good luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

5
Recommendations / Re: letter of recommendation
« on: February 19, 2009, 02:20:11 PM »
Typically professors and employers (or other supervisors) write LORs.  However, if your TA is very familiar with your work and you can trust them to write a persuasive LOR, the TA might be a good option.  That being said, you might now want a LOR from just another college student without some other professional background.  You want to be sure that the LOR comes from someone who can write effectively and has the background or other proficiency necessary to be respected by the committee who reads the LOR.  Good luck!

6
Recommendations / Re: How to ask for a recommendation?
« on: February 19, 2009, 02:15:54 PM »
That is always a tough situation.  I would recommend that you approach a professor that you particularly liked and be honest, tell them that although you did not participate as actively as you would have liked, you truly enjoyed his or her class and would be honored if they would write a recommendation on your behalf.  The worst thing they can say is no.  Most professors get questions like this all the time so it is not something they are not expecting.  It would certainly be helpful if you could provide them with a resume or writing sample to remind them of your work.  You can also mention, if applicable, how interested you are in research or other writing the professor is doing.  And, if the professor attending the school you are applying to or has any other connection, they might be honestly thrilled to help.

Don't take shortcuts when it comes to recommendations though - you don't want to start off your legal career on a bad foot before it has even begun.  Best of luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law 

7
Personal Statement / Re: Is 3 pages double-spaced too long?
« on: February 19, 2009, 02:01:13 PM »
As to the length of the personal statement, some schools have certain word/page limits so you should be sure to make sure you are staying within those guideilnes.  If the school does not mention a word or page limit, I would not go too far beyond two and a half pages unless there is a really important reason to do so.  The committee has a limited time for each application and you want to make sure you put your best foot forward as quickly as possible so that you can effectively grab their attention.  Just like you won't want to give your clients briefs that are too long when you are a practicing attorney - just want to give them the essentials of what they need to know.  You might want to take another look at your personal statement and see if there is anything that is not essential to the main theme.  I would be happy to review it for your as well if you would like.  Feel free to send it over!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law   

8
Personal Statement / Re: letter asking for an interview
« on: February 19, 2009, 01:47:31 PM »
Hi Nick,

While it is terrific that you are this enthusiastic about attending law school, it is unclear to me why you need this letter or why you need to request an interview.  You are always free to visit the law school on your own accord or call ahead and arrange to meet with the dean or other faculty members or students if you have specific questions.  I think the letter is well written but I worry that it could potentially do more harm than good if the school doesn't understand why you are sending it.  If you have submitted a thorough application package, it should speak for itself.  After you are accepted, a lot of law schools have programs where admitted students can sit in on classes and meet faculty members and that might be your best bet.  Best of luck! 

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

9
Law School Applications / Re: Law school taking in transfer credits?
« on: February 11, 2009, 04:21:17 PM »
Yes, the LSAC always takes into account all of your grades, including your transfer credits.  If you still have additional questions, feel free to contact me or someone at LSAC.  Good luck!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

10
Law School Applications / Re: Would you publish it?
« on: February 11, 2009, 04:18:14 PM »
Echoing the feedback you have already received, I would definitely publish it! It is very impressive to be able to publish an article like this before even entering law school (so congratulations!).  It can only show the school what a good decision they made to admit you.  If you are still concerned, you can send the dean a courtesy copy beforehand with a cover letter letting the dean know that it will be released soon and that you look forward to discussing the policy further with him once you get to campus.  I am sure the dean will appreciate your consideration.  Congratulations again!

Alisa Greenstein | Veritas Prep Admissions Consultant | www.VeritasPrep.com/law

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 7