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Messages - umass22

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11
Also, how is the cost of living in Miami/surrounding Miami suburbs? Ive grown up in the suburbs of New Jersey, so I use the cost of living in New Jersey as my "standard".  Will living in Miami be comparable to what I am used to, or higher/lower?

Well, your housing is taken care of, and housing is one of the biggest expenses in Miami.  You won't find a decent 1 BR (in a decent area) for under $900 or so, and $1k is quickly becoming the norm.  Gas prices in Miami are some of the highest in the state as well.  I would think food prices are comparable, I don't know about NJ but FL does not tax food. 

Florida is a fairly tax-friendly state in general if you live here, all things considered, though people are raising hell about high property tax rates since this housing bubble pushed prices way up (and they haven't fallen as much here as they have in other areas).  We really stick it to our tourists!  As long as you don't rent a car or a hotel room you can avoid much of that.  We tax the hell out of alcohol, though, but what state doesn't?  We also have no state income tax, which probably won't affect you much while in law school. 

Great! Thanks for the info! So basically, the cost of living in Miami isn't really comparable to NYC? 

12
Also, how is the cost of living in Miami/surrounding Miami suburbs? Ive grown up in the suburbs of New Jersey, so I use the cost of living in New Jersey as my "standard".  Will living in Miami be comparable to what I am used to, or higher/lower?

13
I'm going to U of Miami, and I am hoping to get into corporate law/finance law in Miami afterwards. I do have some connections in the area as well through a contact. How feasable would this be? Also, how is it living in Florida? I'm coming up from living in New Jersey all my life, so I'm not sure what to expect going from living in a suburb, to living in the city in florida.

Do you have a place lined up?

Miami is a huge, densely-populated town.  It helps if you speak Spanish.  Also, like most major cities, there are areas in Miami that are great, and other areas where you simply do not want to be caught after dark.  I've heard both good and bad things about the Coral Gables area (which is where UM is located) so be cautious about housing there (if you haven't found something already).  The Kendall and Doral areas are fairly middle-class and safe, but you'll have to commute to UM from there.



You mean a place to live? Yea, I lucked out and got a spot in the brand new on campus apts, so I don't have to worry about housing for my 1L year. It is a 5 minute walk, if even that to the law building from my apt  :D  I do know basic spanish, but certainly not fluent enough to hold any kind of conversation. I can ask people what time it is, where is ..., what is your name, but just basic stuff like that.

If you mean a place to work, no, not at all. I haven't even moved down there yet.

14
General Off-Topic Board / Mike Nifong hearing (Duke Lax prosecutor)
« on: June 15, 2007, 11:19:31 AM »
It is on right now. This guy absolutely needs to be disbarred and then criminaly prosecuted.  >:(  Anything less then disbarred is going to be completely unnaceptable.

15
I'm going to U of Miami, and I am hoping to get into corporate law/finance law in Miami afterwards. I do have some connections in the area as well through a contact. How feasable would this be? Also, how is it living in Florida? I'm coming up from living in New Jersey all my life, so I'm not sure what to expect going from living in a suburb, to living in the city in florida.

16
There will be people there smarter than you. Some people at my school are scary smart. Smart enough to go to Yale, but because of personal reasons they need to stay in Denver. Probably be the same at your school. There will also be people who prepped intently for the LSAT, but don’t really have the natural kills to get “it” in law school.

The curve will also affect you. Thus its NEVER a good idea to put all your eggs in one basket (OCI). Your networking contacts, if done right, will be a good safety net and will get you interviews you never would have gotten from OCI (because less than 25% of the available legal jobs are actually advertised, the rest are word of mouth). Just do the best you can grade wise, and network effectively and either way you will have decent options. 


that's the one thing I have, drive. I may not naturally be a genius, but ever since a young age i've told myself that I will never settle for an average life, and that keeps me going. I may not be the smartest person in the room at all times, but I am certainly one of the most dedicated and hard working around in my opinion. Im hoping that will count for something? 

17
Personal connections will pay off more for you than good grades alone. People are people, they like to hire people they know something about personally. If given the choice between an unknown entity that is just a resume with X grades and Y school over an entity that is know to that person, and whom that person already likes, the later will almost always get the job. Law is about who you know and who likes you.

The thing is good networking takes time and commitment. Start working your networking contacts as soon as you get to law school and by the time end of 1L comes along people will know you well enough to want to help you. You need to know people pretty well, and when they know you pretty well, you won’t even have to ask for a job or introduction, they will do it for you. But you can’t do this by occasionally seeing or e-mailing them once a month, you need to be more active than that. Weekly if possible.

People think OCI is the only way into a firm, its not, it’s the only way into a firm as an unknown worker bee competing against 100’s of other unknowns for the same slot. Partners and associates are free to bring people in themselves and completely bypass the usual OCI route. It happens all the time. These hand picked newbies get more meaningful work sooner because your working directly with someone who already knows and trusts you, not just arbitrarily assigned to someone who has no personal stake in your ultimate success or failure.

I have gotten all my jobs through networking, I have never once done OCI or mass mailed a single resume. All of my jobs have in fact been offered to me, rather than me asking anyone for a job. It took about a year of hardcore networking, and going to meetings, CLE’s, lunches etc, but after a year I had a good core of mentors and friends in the legal world. Since then people have come to me with offers. And when I have said I would really like to do X, someone has ALLWAYS said I know Y who does X, let me make a call and get the two of you together.

I would make networking with this person, and creating and nourishing my network my number 2 priority after grades as soon as you get to school. And then, depending on grades, my number one priority for years 2/3.


I actually have been saying since I got into law school that I will have 3 priorities in law school. #1 will be grades. #2 will be networking. And #3 will be continuing to go to the gym and staying in shape. 

If you do this you will be set, great grades and OCI will get you in, great grades and networkinkg and your set for just about any job

i am gonna put forth 110% once i start law school, but I'm just worried that a lot of people there might just be naturally smarter than me, plus you have all the high LSAT scorers on full scholarship that you have to compete with too.  :-[ I certainly do not doubt my ability to work hard, but I am doubting if that is enough to get me to the level I need to be at.

18
Big talk for someone who scored a 156 on the lSAT, and had a 3.0 GPA. You don't actually belong at NYU you know. You just happen to go there.

Actually, I'm pretty sure I deserve going there much more than most of the 170 scorers who also got in. I'd argue my background proves my potential for success a lot more than a 5 hour test does. That being said, I know it must suck hard to have better numbers than me and still end up at a lesser school. I'm sorry for that, but for what it's worth, you weren't close enough to be admitted to NYU that I took your spot anyway, so it really makes no difference for you.

did you transfer into NYU or something?

19
The fact that you're seriously listening to any of the sh*t Wiimote comes up with means you're useless to any industry. HTH.

Big talk for someone who scored a 156 on the lSAT, and had a 3.0 GPA. You don't actually belong at NYU you know. You just happen to go there.

watch it buddy, I scored a 156 as well   :)

20
General Off-Topic Board / Re: Anyone here work out?
« on: June 14, 2007, 12:44:26 PM »
HIIT is really only useful for people who are already in good enough shape to really give it 100%. If you're just starting up, it'd be better to find something that you can do for an extended time (30-60minutes) without making you hate life. Jogging or cycling is a good start, even walking if you're in really poor shape.


As for original question, I work out about 3 hours a day, although no weight training as I'm bound to weight classes for competition and I'm a solid 20 lbs over my competetive weight on a daily basis. I used to love lifting weights when I did it though, it's a really rewarding way to exercise when you can see and feel the improvements all the time.

yea that is true with HIIT. I had to start jogging and working up to it before i could handle it, and i can still barely handle it now, after like 4 or 5 sprints, my last 5 sprints are more like jogs haha. but i found that going on an excercise bike for 45 minutes and trying to do 9-10 miles on it isn't very hard but it gets me very sweaty. I usually do that primarily for my cardio.

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