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21
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Advice heading into Feb 09 LSAT!
« on: December 12, 2008, 03:30:25 AM »
Listen to EarlCat. He is wise.

Becoming prepared for the LSAT will not happen overnight; for most people it is a process that develops over a period of 3-36 months. The beauty of it is that as one is experimenting with different techniques, one is learning how to take the test. By the time one has reviewed 2 or more preparation aids, one should be familiar with the different question types on the LSAT and have an idea of which ones seem harder than others. At that point one should be developing a personal strategy, working on improving difficult question types, and learning to manage time during each section.

I think a solid way to prepare for the LSAT is to take previously administered LSATs, one at a time, and then review the results. This review should consist of examining each question, even the ones answered correctly. Instead of relying on a book to explain why the wrong answers were wrong, though, I think it is healthier to examine the answer choices and make one's own determinations. I believe this builds mental strength, as well as confidence, because one learns to explain the answers better than any book can. This also encourages one to think like the producers of the LSAT, not the makers of the 3rd-party preparation materials. This, perhaps, is why some prep materials/courses can actually hurt you; they may help you in one area, but then they teach a method that clashes with your learning style in another area. The trick is to recognize it and discard what doesn't work for you.

When it comes down to it, I say screw the prep materials. Look over them, then put them aside. Just buy all the previously administered LSATs, take them one at a time, and figure out how they work (and how you work with them). That's what a lawyer would do!

22
It sounds like TM helped you with logic games; I hope you scored well on the December LSAT. I was scared of logic games after I took a cold diagnostic. I worked on them very hard, though, and it payed off (21/23 October 2008). I grew quite fond of them, and I'm almost sad I won't get to do them any more.

I didn't take a Prep Course, but I did prepare well on my own for my October 2008 LSAT. I think developing a strategy for the LSAT is a very personal subject, and everyone will need to develop his/her own strategy to maximize his/her potential. The best one can do, in my opinion, is experiment with several different established sources, such as Prep Courses and printed publications, and incorporate favorable elements from those sources into one's personal strategy.

Becoming prepared for the LSAT will not happen overnight; for most people it is a process that develops over a period of 3-36 months. The beauty of it is that as one is experimenting with different techniques, one is learning how to take the test. By the time one has reviewed 2 or more preparation aids, one should be familiar with the different question types on the LSAT and have an idea of which ones seem harder than others. At that point one should be developing a personal strategy, working on improving difficult question types, and learning to manage time during each section.

I think a solid way to prepare for the LSAT is to take previously administered LSATs, one at a time, and then review the results. This review should consist of examining each question, even the ones answered correctly. Instead of relying on a book to explain why the wrong answers were wrong, though, I think it is healthier to examine the answer choices and make one's own determinations. I believe this builds mental strength, as well as confidence, because one learns to explain the answers better than any book can. This also encourages one to think like the producers of the LSAT, not the makers of the 3rd-party preparation materials. This, perhaps, is why some prep materials/courses can actually hurt you; they may help you in one area, but then they teach a method that clashes with your learning style in another area. The trick is to recognize it and discard what doesn't work for you.

When it comes down to it, I say screw the prep materials. Look over them, then put them aside. Just buy all the previously administered LSATs, take them one at a time, and figure out how they work (and how you work with them). That's what a lawyer would do!

23
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Dec 6, 2008 LSAT
« on: December 12, 2008, 02:12:28 AM »
I almost forgot how to write in cursive - it took longer to complete that certifying statement than it did to finish the writing sample at the end of the test!

24
LSAC and LSDAS / Re: Are post-college classes taken into account?
« on: December 06, 2008, 02:58:50 PM »
I took a couple classes after graduation, and I get the same results through LSDAS ("SEE TRANS"). Kind of a bummer, because those classes would have increased my gpa!

25
Studying for the LSAT / Re: An easy warm up game?
« on: December 06, 2008, 03:58:47 AM »
How about these:

1)PrepTest 35 (October 2001)- Section 3 Questions 6-12 (6 new cars with 3 options)

2)PrepTest 34 (June 2001)- Section 4 Questions 13-18 (7 different trains arrive at Middlebrook).

3)PrepTest 31 (June 2000)- Section 1 Questions 14-18 (Operations, Productions, Sales).

26
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Mechanical Pencils NOT ACCEPTED??
« on: December 06, 2008, 03:28:43 AM »
I'm glad they banned mechanical pencils. I took quite a few timed PrepTests at the public library; I kept my focus through little kids screaming in the youth zone, older kids skateboarding right outside the window, and the intermittant chatter at the reference desk. Then came the girl with the click-pen. She sat at the table directly in front of me, and it started within 60 seconds of her arrival:

***click-CLICK***

***click-CLICK***   ***click-CLICK***

***click-CLICK***

***click-CLICK***   ***click-CLICK***    ***click-CLICK***   ***click-CLICK***


                       *click*

My heart rate increased rapidly; I felt my blood pressure soar. I panicked as I imagined taking the LSAT while being pummeled by a sporadic set of percussive sound waves bent on preventing me from reading anything longer than six words. It was the only distraction able to break my concentration during my training; I wanted to beat the crap out of that girl and blow up her click-pen. I had to remind myself that no-one will have mechanical pens/pencils at the test, and I nearly fainted in relief as I got up to vomit in the restroom.

Good Luck on the LSAT; remember it's no harder than any Practice Test you've already taken!!!

27
Studying for the LSAT / Re: CIGGS??
« on: December 06, 2008, 02:56:18 AM »
Although smoking isn't permitted in the testing room, neither cigarettes nor lighters are expressly forbidden by LSAC. However, if anyone asks, you will have to inform them that your cigarettes are either hygeine or medical products.

Good luck on the test!

28
Studying for the LSAT / Re: An easy warm up game?
« on: December 06, 2008, 02:40:26 AM »
Oh wait, I know this one!!!

Five digit product codes...I think it's from the June 2007 LSAT. Classic warmup game.

29
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Day before the LSAT...
« on: December 05, 2008, 06:26:58 PM »
I still have to take PrepTests 37, 43 and 49 under timed conditions. I'm going to take two tonight, get to bed by 11, get up at 4 and take the last one right before the test. Then I'll warm up with some extra logic games while I'm standing in line.

30
Quote
from: itzjulz on Yesterday at 12:23:24 PM
Are any/all of you working towards working in the entertainment/media law fields?  I'm applying soon, and working on my personal statement for applications.  I'm leaning towards a statement about how my experiences so far in music and the music industry have led to my interest in entertainment law (I currently work for a live music production/booking company, and previously interned for a prominent entertainment attorney/artist manager, and the Grammys), and I'm curious if anyone else has had success with a statement similar to mine.

I devoted about 1/3 of my Personal Statement to my music career (I sang lead vocals for several hard rock bands for 10+ years); I got accepted for Spring 2009. The general theme of my essay was accountability, and I highlighted my responsibilities for band behavior, live concert promotion and recording studio etiquette/efficiency to support that theme. You're welcome to read it, just let me know.

I would suggest illustrating not only how your experiences have led to an interest in entertainment law, but also how they have specifically prepared you for the study of entertainment law. Write a statement so compelling that the reader is rooting for you to succeed as an attorney. Just keep it real.

Good luck!



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