Law School Discussion

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Messages - senseless

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1
What are the opinions regarding special accommodations for law school exams? If a classmate (with no physical disabilities and no apparent learning disabilities) has requested special accommodations, received them, and then averaged 93 (out of 95) while booking one of five classes, should one be suspicious? How does one proceed in such a situation?

2
It really varies a lot from semester to semester and depends on which law student (some study a whole lot more than others) and whether you consider student org activities or independent writing projects part of studying. There are some days where I start at 6-something AM and other than a short break to eat and such keep at it till about midnight, there are other days where I do almost no work outside class. Overall though law school takes a lot of time and is a major commitment. I wouldn't plan on much of a life outside of law school:)


I agree. It's a marathon mixed with a rollercoaster. Some days I hit it hard for 10-12 hours, other days I give it a quick 1 or 2 hour review (in addition to class time). However, this stratagy doesn't work for everyone. Some, like bryan9584, take the 9-to-5 approach and it works well for them. If you take this approach, you should have no problem fitting in your training.

3
Studying and Exam Taking / Re: Sample Property Exam Questions
« on: April 24, 2009, 07:53:20 PM »
A, a 1L, is studying in her law school library with nothing but her laptop computer. She gets up to go to the bathroom, closing and leaving her laptop on the table at which she was studying. While A is in the bathroom, B, a fellow law student, walks by the table and sees A's laptop, which B falsely but sincerely believes to be the one he left in the library last night at the very same table. B has already bought a replacement, but he figures he can sell what he believes to be his old one to recover some of the cost. He picks it up, takes it outside, and ponders how he will go about selling it. However, he notices the outer shell is cracked, so he immediately takes the laptop to Zeke's Computer Sales & Repair to get it fixed.

Right after B drops off the laptop at Zeke's, C, another fellow law student, walks in looking for a laptop computer. He spots the laptop B just brought in and tells Zeke, the storeowner, that he wants to buy it. Zeke tells him the outer shell is cracked, but C doesn't care; he tells Zeke he wants to buy it “as is.” Zeke shrugs his shoulders and offers to sell it for $300. C agrees, produces the money, and the deal is done.

Following the purchase, C then goes into the law school library, sits at the table A had originally occupied, and begins studying with the laptop he just purchased. It turns out A got distracted by an unusually long cell phone call and has not been back to the table since she went to the bathroom. When she returns and sees C using the laptop, she tells him to give it to her. C refuses and says he owns it. At that moment B walks in, sees the laptop in front of C, and also demands its return. A looks at B in disbelief, and C is confused by both of them.

Analyze any and all relevant property interests held by A, B and C, and discuss.

4
Studying and Exam Taking / Re: Property Checklist
« on: April 24, 2009, 07:20:16 PM »
130 pages is incredible. Mine was 12 pages. For the Dukeminier casebook, check out the Legalines case briefs plus black letter law. It comes in very handy.

5
California Western / Re: So I noticed this board ain't so active.
« on: January 09, 2009, 02:15:30 AM »
Nice to meet you, Steve, I'm Brian. I started at Cal Western Spring 2009 (3 days ago). Are you still around? One of my goals is to get this board kickin'...

6
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Question regarding my practice LSAT score
« on: December 28, 2008, 03:23:22 AM »
I agree about the 2 years being excessive. It was by far not the smartest decision of my life, but I only really preped for the LSAT for 6 solid weeks and increased 11 points from my diagnositic. 2-3 months of some good studying and anyone that does it the right way should be close to the 160 range regardless of diagnostic score.

2 years may certainly be excessive, especially if a score around 160 is desired. However, I was thinking more along the lines of 172-176. The choice of schools and scholarship money to be earned from such a high score is worth the extra study time. I'm not talking about getting a respectable score, I'm talking about getting an exceptional score.

I studied hard for 6 months, and I'm sure I could have gotten 10 points higher with another 6 months of study.

I searched online about my current quandary and I haven't found anything helpful thus far.

Here is my question:

Within the past couple of months I have gained an interest in law. In October, my school offered a Kaplan sponsored practice LSAT event which I attended. Prior to taking the test, I had almost no idea what would be on it, including the "traps" of the exam and that certain questions would be harder than others which test takers should initially avoid and then retrace their steps to tackle the harder questions later on. I did not know this. I ended up receiving a 144 which I was very very upset about. However, I am optimistic that I can raise this. My question to you all is what sort of increase should I expect after studying a practice LSAT book. I am coming to you because I know that many of you have much more experience with the test than I do. Maybe you can help me? thanks.

Give yourself 2 years at an average of 15 hours/week to prepare for the LSAT. Once you get on track, adjust accordingly. If you feel comfortable before 2 years passes, take the LSAT when you know you are ready. Look at several different established techniques, developing your own in the process. It goes without saying that you should use nothing but real LSAT questions for your training, unless you really know what you're doing.

2 years for one test  :o
You can do half your UG in that time and later 2/3 of LS in 2 years.
Something doesn't smell right with this.



The LSAT is potentially more important than your entire UG gpa. I realize it sounds asinine, but I stick to it. You don't just take the LSAT and then "forget" what you've learned; your LSAT training will help you, to a certain extent, with your law school studies and your future legal career. With that in mind, I think it's important to spend many months refining and eventually mastering your techniques for answering any and all types of LSAT questions with lightning speed. You may not necessarily want a 180, but you may like the idea of paying no tuition and possibly no living expenses for your legal education.


7
Law School Applications / Re: I need advice...
« on: December 27, 2008, 04:37:20 AM »
This thread brings up a very important topic which I haven't seen dicussed much. How do you explain "discrepancies" to law schools? What do you tell them if you've been arrested or maybe even done jail time? Can ex-cons get law degrees?

I think the first thing to remember is that law schools want people of integrity and character. The second thing to remember is that law school admission council members are human, and they know you're human. They would rather hear you explain what you learned from your mistake(s) than excuses or feeble attempts at denial. I know a (sober for 8 years) attorney who got 3 DUIs before going to law school. He turned his life around. Answer truthfully, and show confidence in your responses.

8
I don't know what's wrong w/ you... it all "clicked" at the end of the semester for me.

Here's a good link that you might find helpful in your situation. 



Awesome-sauce.

You guys are really mean...but funny. No wonder my family left Michigan.

Go Lions!!!

9
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Going over the hump in LR
« on: December 27, 2008, 04:05:07 AM »
Thanks for the inputs.

It wasn't really only two weeks I've been working on the LR section.  I went through the LR bible last summer and have been on and off because of school fall semester (really couldn't focus because of school work).  However, this spring semester I only have class 3 times a week so I plan on going crazy.  Anyways, yes I do solve the LG section here and there.  Do you think I'll have enough practice (leaving about 10-13 whole exams for the final stretch to June to time them intensively) material left? (I went though the 10 actual, and at the 29th one on the 10 more actual.) 

Any other advice? Thanks!

It sounds like you're on track, and with diligence you will be well prepared this June. You should do fine if you make good on your pledge to go crazy this Spring semester

My piece of advice is to purchase at least the 10 most recent LSATs from LSAC. You can get the October 2008 LSAT right now, and you will be able to get the December 2008 LSAT in late January 2009. You must purchase these tests individually at a price of $8 each, but it is one of the best investments you could possibly make for LSAT preparation.

10
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Question regarding my practice LSAT score
« on: December 27, 2008, 03:27:24 AM »
I searched online about my current quandary and I haven't found anything helpful thus far.

Here is my question:

Within the past couple of months I have gained an interest in law. In October, my school offered a Kaplan sponsored practice LSAT event which I attended. Prior to taking the test, I had almost no idea what would be on it, including the "traps" of the exam and that certain questions would be harder than others which test takers should initially avoid and then retrace their steps to tackle the harder questions later on. I did not know this. I ended up receiving a 144 which I was very very upset about. However, I am optimistic that I can raise this. My question to you all is what sort of increase should I expect after studying a practice LSAT book. I am coming to you because I know that many of you have much more experience with the test than I do. Maybe you can help me? thanks.

Give yourself 2 years at an average of 15 hours/week to prepare for the LSAT. Once you get on track, adjust accordingly. If you feel comfortable before 2 years passes, take the LSAT when you know you are ready. Look at several different established techniques, developing your own in the process. It goes without saying that you should use nothing but real LSAT questions for your training, unless you really know what you're doing.

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