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Messages - dutchtowner

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21
Non-Traditional Students / Re: LSAC forum
« on: September 12, 2008, 09:09:57 PM »
no takers, eh?   ;D

I'll do my best to represent non-trads!  Headed there tomorrow, hoping it's a productive day!

Dutch

22
Non-Traditional Students / LSAC forum
« on: September 08, 2008, 03:17:05 PM »
Any of you old folk gonna be at the LSAC forum in the ATL this weekend?  :)

If you are, look for the old fat man that looks lost, 8) that'll be me!

Hoping to talk with a few admissions people to answer some questions!


Ciao,
Dutch

23
Non-Traditional Students / Re: Do Older Students Ever Get Scholarships?
« on: August 30, 2008, 07:51:10 PM »
Just find the number of the local office and ask them if you can talk with their instructor for 15 minutes.  My office was always nice about doing this.  I've heard that some offices aren't (which would make me wonder what they're hiding).

About the December test, realize that you'll be applying very very late in the cycle, which will put you at a serious disadvantage.  It may be worth considering waiting until next year to apply.  (Especially if you're not happy with your practice tests by Dec.)

10-4 on the late part EC.  I registered at first to take the test in Oct but then changed the date since I knew that finishing my UG degree (in 6 weeks) plus studying for the LSAT prob wouldn't be a good idea.  I'll be finished in mid-October and decided to dedicate my full time to prep for a couple months. I doubt seriously I'd have the credentials to get into a T14 school anyways but on the chance that I can score high, then feel I'd fare pretty well in the admissions process.

BTW, if the instructor would talk to me, what's important?  Experience? expertise? dedication?

Thanks,
Dutch 

24
Non-Traditional Students / Re: Do Older Students Ever Get Scholarships?
« on: August 30, 2008, 09:20:14 AM »
Hey thanks for the good word EC!

You appear to be one of the resident experts on the LSAT?  I'm looking at taking a 4 session course at Emory in the ATL but also considering a Powerscore class that is a bit more intense. Any suggestions?  The course at Emory is taught by a PhD in English that likes to teach prep test classes in the continuing education branch of the university, but I know how important it is to score high and want to do my best in preparing.

I'm sure no matter who is teaching it, 4 sessions will not be near enough.  Powerscore has a good reputation, though I have no experience with their classes personally.  I worked for Princeton Review myself and I'm pretty fond of the new hyperlearning course.  Wherever you go, it's most important that you check out the instructor.  It's teachers, not brands, that make good classes.  Private tutoring is another option, though it tends to cost a lot more money.  LSAT is a big deal in law school admissions, so don't skimp on your prepping opportunities.  Let me know if you have any questions.






Hey thanks again EC!

BTW, how in the world do you actually check out the instructor?  The couses I've checked out so far just have a place for registering and don't mention an instructor.  I've got a pretty limited window (Sept-December) for prep since I'm doing the December test, and of course I already feel a little late in prepping AND in the admissions application process.

Please humor an old man?  :)

Dutch 

25
Non-Traditional Students / Re: Do Older Students Ever Get Scholarships?
« on: August 29, 2008, 09:01:13 PM »
I do hope to start a second career but have noted many negative comments on other threads about the lack of work.

What, not enough people suing each other?  You can find work as an attorney.  Maybe not big big money work, but there's more than enough work to go around.  I met a guy the other day in his mid to late 50s who recently graduated from Vanderbilt.  He's working as a public defender, which is not terribly lucrative, but he absolutely loves his new career.  Don't let anyone discourage you!


Hey thanks for the good word EC!

You appear to be one of the resident experts on the LSAT?  I'm looking at taking a 4 session course at Emory in the ATL but also considering a Powerscore class that is a bit more intense. Any suggestions?  The course at Emory is taught by a PhD in English that likes to teach prep test classes in the continuing education branch of the university, but I know how important it is to score high and want to do my best in preparing.  Any input appreciated!

Thanks,
Dutch

26
Non-Traditional Students / Re: Do Older Students Ever Get Scholarships?
« on: August 26, 2008, 09:40:44 PM »
Yes, schools go give merit scholarships to "old" students.

I am also "old" (50). I took a practice LSAT last summer with no preparation and got in the mid 150's like you. Then I studied about 150 hours all summer and part of the fall, and got 178 (99% percentile) on the real test on September 29. First I studied a prep book from Princeton, I think. Then I studied the "Bibles" and many, many old actual tests. You can buy these on Amazon. For me, the hardest part was the games. So I actually wound up doing each real game section at least three times, spaced out a few weeks apart usually. It was like an extra job or a hobby that bordered on obsession. If I had not taken it so seriously, I would never have scored so high. I probably spent around $1,000 on preparation, the test itself, a motel room near the test site the night before etc.

My undergraduate GPA was 3.4, not high at all these days.

Then when scores were reported, I started getting emails from all sorts of schools inviting me to apply without paying their application fee, so I applied to around 18 or 20 schools, just for fun. I received many partial or full tuition scholarships based on merit, from schools all around the country, even some T1's.


Very impressed that you scored so high on the LSAT. I am old in school cirles at age 51 but just registered to take the LSAT in December. I do hope to start a second career but have noted many negative comments on other threads about the lack of work. I don't however plan to let that deter me from pursuing admission to a good law school in 2009.  I'll be finished with my UG degree in about 7 weeks and am ready to go!

Thanks for the good news about financial help; I don't think I can score 179 on the LSAT but with a good score maybe I can swing it! Still haven't decided on an LSAT prep course.....anyone have advice?  I suspect I'd benefit from the 'structure' of a class.

Thanks!
Dutch

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