Law School Discussion

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Messages - Holden Caulfield

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31
Where should I go next fall? / Re: SMU Reduced Load Program
« on: October 02, 2008, 02:47:13 PM »
..

32
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Need some advice...
« on: September 24, 2008, 12:56:51 PM »
I can speak for Kaplan firsthand.

The course really helps with diagnostics close to yours (145-155). Students in this range seem to show the most improvement. People starting below never really improve over 150 and people starting above are usually bored in class and could probably better spend their time studying on their own. My diagnostic was 154 and I scored in the upper 160's on test day.

Class: My teacher was good, but many teachers are not so good. Take a sample class to make sure your teacher knows what he's doing and is good at explaining concepts. My first big jump in score came from just learning the basic methods and concepts in class.

Materials: The three practice books (mastery, pacing, and endurance) were the biggest help. Once I learned the concepts in class, I practiced them over, and over, and over in these books. If the teacher at your center is no good, I would recommend the online course: you get these materials and can learn the concepts through online lessons (very boring though)

I think most of Kaplan's criticism stems from two things:
1. People with high diagnostics taking the course and finding it worthless
2. Bad teachers

I have seen many people succeed with Kaplan firsthand and would recommend the course. I you have any specific questions feel free to ask here or PM me.

33
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Study Plan - any recommended changes
« on: September 21, 2008, 12:00:45 PM »
After you finish the LGB, it looks like you'll go 4 months without working logic games; and you'll have a two month break after the LRB. Even if you master both, you'll want to continue practicing each or you might get rusty.

I would take more of a balanced approach and continually work all subjects; but as always, do what works best for you.

34
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Another Tier 3/4 question
« on: September 19, 2008, 12:20:09 PM »
the problem is that a "decent income" working for a small firm is not going to be $70,000 a year in most cases. biglaw pays around $100-160K....the next step down is often to $35,000-50,000 a year. so if you're comfortable earning that salary out of law school, tier 3/4 without loans should be fine.

I don't think this is entirely accurate. The next step down from big law is not making 35-50,000 a year. This may be true for a small firm (10 or less attorneys) because they simply don't have the money for the high salaries. But midsize firms you can easily make between 50-80,000 and still have a life.

I agree with what people are saying for the most part. If you are in a legal market that is not flooded with higher ranked schools AND your school has a good local rep and you want to stay there, take the money and run. Make sure your school has a good rep though. I would not go anywhere that is consistently trashed by others.


I completely agree. I don't know where this rumor started that it was $160,000 or $40,000, but from what I've seen that's very inaccurate. Everyone I know that has gone into non-biglaw private firms has started in the 80's, or 90's.


Take everything you read on this board with a grain of salt.

It's definitely not $160K or $40K.  Some people make under $30K.

You are correct, but just about all of them didn't go to law school.

Sorry to burst your bubble, but many of them did.

I can't help but wonder what somebody did (or didn't) do to put themselves in that position.

35
Where should I go next fall? / Re: SMU Reduced Load Program
« on: September 19, 2008, 12:13:43 PM »
im from texas and SMU's tuition is insanely high. even with a 25,000 scholarship it's beyond affordable for me.

$11,000 a year is a steal for an education at a tier 1 school if you ask me

36
General Board / Re: When should I take the LSAT?
« on: September 18, 2008, 10:36:33 PM »
I realize students and graduates may be better able to answer this question for me:
Here is the skinny: I can take the LSAT October 4th and score between a 158-164 with a GPA of a 3.13 or apply in December confident to score a 165-172 with a GPA of about a 3.25. I also have some character issues I will have to explain and probably request interviews if possible. I know most schools have rolling admission. Here are some of the schools I want to apply to:Fordham, Rutgers, Seton Hall, Brooklyn Law, Cordoza School of Law. Would I be most advantageous to take it in October or December. If I do go to Seton Hall I would like to try and get scholarship money. I realize there is no set answer so give me your opinion.

Given the two scenarios I would take the December test. That said, I'm not sure how realistically anyone can forecast their future improvements on the LSAT.

Of course, no one knows your abilities better than you. If you're confident you can get it up there, I say go for it.

37
Where should I go next fall? / Re: 3.2 / 160-165, thanks...
« on: September 18, 2008, 10:18:20 PM »
I have a buddy with close to those numbers (top of your LSAT range) that got a full scholarship offer from Texas Tech and about 2/3 scholarship to SMU.

Also, don't let anybody discourage you from considering Texas Tech. If you want to practice in TX, it's a good school. I visited it and was very impressed.

38
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Another Tier 3/4 question
« on: September 18, 2008, 12:11:25 AM »
the problem is that a "decent income" working for a small firm is not going to be $70,000 a year in most cases. biglaw pays around $100-160K....the next step down is often to $35,000-50,000 a year. so if you're comfortable earning that salary out of law school, tier 3/4 without loans should be fine.

I don't think this is entirely accurate. The next step down from big law is not making 35-50,000 a year. This may be true for a small firm (10 or less attorneys) because they simply don't have the money for the high salaries. But midsize firms you can easily make between 50-80,000 and still have a life.

I agree with what people are saying for the most part. If you are in a legal market that is not flooded with higher ranked schools AND your school has a good local rep and you want to stay there, take the money and run. Make sure your school has a good rep though. I would not go anywhere that is consistently trashed by others.


I completely agree. I don't know where this rumor started that it was $160,000 or $40,000, but from what I've seen that's very inaccurate. Everyone I know that has gone into non-biglaw private firms has started in the 80's, or 90's.


Take everything you read on this board with a grain of salt.

It's definitely not $160K or $40K.  Some people make under $30K.

You are correct, but just about all of them didn't go to law school.

39
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Another Tier 3/4 question
« on: September 17, 2008, 11:54:14 PM »
the problem is that a "decent income" working for a small firm is not going to be $70,000 a year in most cases. biglaw pays around $100-160K....the next step down is often to $35,000-50,000 a year. so if you're comfortable earning that salary out of law school, tier 3/4 without loans should be fine.

I don't think this is entirely accurate. The next step down from big law is not making 35-50,000 a year. This may be true for a small firm (10 or less attorneys) because they simply don't have the money for the high salaries. But midsize firms you can easily make between 50-80,000 and still have a life.

I agree with what people are saying for the most part. If you are in a legal market that is not flooded with higher ranked schools AND your school has a good local rep and you want to stay there, take the money and run. Make sure your school has a good rep though. I would not go anywhere that is consistently trashed by others.


I completely agree. I don't know where this rumor started that it was $160,000 or $40,000, but from what I've seen that's very inaccurate. Everyone I know that has gone into non-biglaw private firms has started in the 80's, or 90's.


Take everything you read on this board with a grain of salt.

40
Where should I go next fall? / Re: SMU Reduced Load Program
« on: September 17, 2008, 11:44:39 PM »
I believe the reduced load program consists of two years going part time; and then two years full time (or something like that). There's also the night program, which is four years.

You should get into the night program with your numbers; I have no info about the reduced load. However, if you can get your LSAT up 5 or 6 points (December test?), you may get into the day program - maybe even get money. There were several applicants with around a 3.2 and 164 that received $25,000 a year in scholarships.

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