Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.

Messages - philosopher

Pages: [1] 2
1
Personal Statement / Read over DS?
« on: December 30, 2008, 07:27:40 PM »
Are there any law students out there who would be willing to read my diversity statement?  PM me if so!  Thanks :)

2
Studying for the LSAT / Re: did anyone lie about their race on the lsat?
« on: October 11, 2008, 12:56:30 PM »
this is just ridiculous.  although I know plenty of white people check "other" to make it SEEM like they are some kind of minority without actually having to choose one of the minority statuses.

They probably just don't want to be discriminated against.  It's not so much that they want to be seen as a minority, they just don't want to be labeled as a "privileged" white person.

This is probably more of a problem for asians, however, who experience the most discrimination in admissions, and are therefore probably most likely to check the "other" box.

probably don't want to be discriminated against?  ha...

Why is this funny?  There's no question that whites and asians are discriminated against in admissions (though it's far worse for asians).  The only question is whether such discrimination is justified by other factors.  That's a debate for other threads.

There's also little question that most people don't like to be discriminated against, period.  And the people who are filling in the "other" box are clearly seeking to avoid this, or they wouldn't be checking the "other" box.  (I doubt they really think it will give them a positive boost, and the truth is, it probably gets them considered as white or even asian in reality.)

Yes, I agree people don't like being discriminated against.  I think what was funny to me is the comment that White's don't want to seem privileged and that somehow this whole "discriminating" thing is really a huge problem for whites.  Don't want to get all philosophical here, but Whites are always more privileged over nonwhites.  It is called "the Racial Contract" in which ALL whites are beneficiaries whether or not they choose to be.  And to try to mask that by checking off another box is pretty low.  But that definitely is a topic for another time and place.

3
Studying for the LSAT / Re: did anyone lie about their race on the lsat?
« on: October 10, 2008, 10:47:06 PM »
this is just ridiculous.  although I know plenty of white people check "other" to make it SEEM like they are some kind of minority without actually having to choose one of the minority statuses.

They probably just don't want to be discriminated against.  It's not so much that they want to be seen as a minority, they just don't want to be labeled as a "privileged" white person.

This is probably more of a problem for asians, however, who experience the most discrimination in admissions, and are therefore probably most likely to check the "other" box.

probably don't want to be discriminated against?  ha...

4
Studying for the LSAT / Re: did anyone lie about their race on the lsat?
« on: October 09, 2008, 11:13:21 PM »
this is just ridiculous.  although I know plenty of white people check "other" to make it SEEM like they are some kind of minority without actually having to choose one of the minority statuses.

Is this speculation or did they tell you their sinister plan? If the latter, you need to find some new people to interact with.

haha it actually is the latter.   :P

5
Studying for the LSAT / Re: did anyone lie about their race on the lsat?
« on: October 09, 2008, 02:59:17 PM »
this is just ridiculous.  although I know plenty of white people check "other" to make it SEEM like they are some kind of minority without actually having to choose one of the minority statuses.

6
Studying for the LSAT / Re: PR or Kaplan course
« on: October 09, 2008, 02:56:11 PM »
I took Princeton Review and I thought it helped a lot.  I was able to go 19 points higher between my first and last diagnostics (and there are only 6).  I of course had a really awesome teacher and he was really dedicated.  But I know of people in PR who didn't have good teachers.  I guess it just depends.  Any class should have its benefits if you are willing to work hard.

7
Studying for the LSAT / Re: I feel so defeated!!
« on: October 05, 2008, 03:31:15 PM »
It's a tough call. After my June test I didn't feel confident going in, but I thought I did decently. At least 165+. And I got a 159 and I wish I had cancelled. This test, being a retake, I also majorly bombed the last game (and part of the third) and as I said elsewhere, was pretty much on the verge of tears heading into the last section and thought 'should I walk out now?' but all I have on file is a 159 and I sure was not retaking this test again and I had paid for it so I was just literally like 'f*ck this' and pretty much tore through the last section with some sort of rage focus and finished it incredibly early (about 10 - 12 minutes to spare). So the point is - you will never know until you get it. I thought I did okay last time and did terribly and I bombed part of one section this time and I may have still done terribly. If you want to apply for next year I would probably just ride it out but if you are not, then I would probably cancel because it's not worth having a really low score on your report if you have the time to redo it.

titcr. I walked out feeling terrible, but am now focusing on all the other things I have to do. All we can do is wait; and I paid for it, damn it, I'll take what I get. If it turns out to be disappointing, well, I'll retake, and I'll know better what to expect going into the next (re: environment, my own psyche, etc).

I'll tell you what though: it's reconfirmed my decision to go to law school, and that is a great motivator. After I left I started feeling so down on myself--"maybe you're just not cut out to be a lawyer", that kind of thing. But that's a load of #&$&, and happily it only took me a few hours to realize it.  ;) Now I'm concentrating on what I need to do to get where I want to be--whether that means retaking, or waiting til next cycle, or whathaveyou.

WHew, ok, I'm nixing the cheerleader talk.  :)

I really admire your confidence.  I've been trying so hard ever since I started studying to have that same confidence.  After the test I felt pretty okay about it, I was just hoping that the 1st RC section I had wasn't the experimental and the 2nd one instead was.  But when I found out it was the other way around, I totally broke down.  It has been really hard to not think so negatively but I'm still trying.  I signed up for the Dec. test just in case, but I'm still holding out hope for the October score.

8
It wont affect the curve at all. Firstly, the curve is determined even before you sit for the test. Secondly, the test takers for the Oct LSAT (even if they were incorporated into the curve) are just a drop in the hat considering that you're compared against every test taker for the last 3 years.

exactly.

9
Recommendations / Re: when should LOR be sent?
« on: August 22, 2008, 11:20:17 AM »
Have them fax the recommendation in whenever it is ready. It takes less than a day during off-peak season, about 1-2 days during peak season, to process a faxed letter. It takes from 7-15 business days to process a mailed letter. Fax, fax, fax!

(The fax number is: 215-504-1444. Make sure they also send the cover letter with your signature!)

Ah, sounds good!  Thanks.

10
Personal Statement / Anyone willing to read a draft?
« on: August 21, 2008, 04:54:28 PM »
I'd love for some law students, recent applicants, lawyers, etc. to read my draft of my personal statement, just to see if I'm at all on track with this.  PM me if you are willing!  Thanks!

Pages: [1] 2