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Messages - HYSHopeful

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31
Studying for the LSAT / Re: testmasters180 or testmasters?
« on: November 20, 2008, 01:10:06 PM »
the real testmasters is at testmasters180.com, which happens to be testmasters.net now. The ads that you are referring to are for testmasters.net, the real (Robin Singh) testmasters.

32
Studying for the LSAT / Re: college classes as prep
« on: October 06, 2008, 11:20:07 AM »
Quote

Any book recomendations for formal logic? -

You can't go wrong with Introduction to Logic, by Harry Gensler

33
Studying for the LSAT / Re: college classes as prep
« on: October 06, 2008, 11:09:14 AM »
I don't know how helpful an intro to philosophy course would be, although if it helped HYS then I'm sure it has the possibility of doing some good.

My intro to philosophy course helped develop my ability to critically analyze arguments. We deconstructed and evaluated arguments on god, free will, utilitarianism, etc. It was a great course that I credit for forming the foundation of much of my analytical thinking skills.

I do think that the extent to which an intro to philosophy course would be helpful for the LSAT depends upon how the course is taught
and who teaches it.

One book that I read in my intro to philosophy course, which I think is why I got as much out of the class as I did, is Think, by Simon BlackBurn (see: Think: A Compelling Introduction to Philosophy). I'd highly recommend it.

34
Studying for the LSAT / Re: college classes as prep
« on: October 06, 2008, 08:58:11 AM »
Anyone think taking critical reasoning and symbolic logic in college is money and time well spent for the test?

I do believe that formal logic and intro to philosophy helped me a great deal on the LR section. I don't think it is a coincidence that philosophy majors have one of the highest LSAT score averages.

Having said that, I believe that spending the time and money on targeted LSAT prep with a prep company or tutor would be more beneficial.

If taking a formal logic course would fulfill some requirement toward graduation or count as an elective, then go for it. If not, spend the tuition money and time on a tutor or prep course.

-HYSHopeful

35
Studying for the LSAT / Re: OMG I got sick before the test.
« on: October 04, 2008, 09:23:00 AM »
Umm....excuse me. You'll have to take a #!!  Lol. ;)

You aren't sick. You are an LSAT machine. Machines can't get sick.

Don't allow yourself to even consider the possibility that being sick could affect your performance on the LSAT. Not now. Don't even consider that possibility until after the exam when you are deciding if you will keep or cancel your score.

 You will take the test tomorrow. You will nail it. You aren't sick. You will do great.

I was lucky enough to watch Tiger Woods 4th round play on June 15th, the day before my LSAT. (see: http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-1874232128237005363&ei=RVXmSMGeDIuE-wG-m_miAw&q=tiger+woods+US+OPEN&vt=lf ) His knee was hurting so bad that he couldn't hit the ball without nearly collapsing in agony. Still, he never considered the possibility of quitting. He never considered the possibility of failure. He maintained focus throughout the round. Despite his injury. Despite the crowds of thousands. He maintained focus and pushed through the pain. There is something inspiring about excellence per se. Get inspired to CRUSH the LSAT tomorrow.


Where did you come from?! And when are we getting married?  ;)

::I AM ARNOLD. LSAT IS CRUSHABLE PUDDING::



 ;)


36
Studying for the LSAT / Re: OMG I got sick before the test.
« on: October 03, 2008, 01:49:06 PM »
what if you have stomach flu?


Take an antiemetic, an anti-motility, and crush the LSAT.

DISCLAIMER:  HYSHOPEFUL DOES NOT PROVIDE ANY MEDICAL ADVICE. The content of this post is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. It is not a substitute for a medical exam, nor does it replace the need for services provided by medical professional. Always seek the advice of your doctor before taking any prescription or over the counter drugs or following any treatment or regiment. Only your doctor can provide you with advice on what is safe and effective for you. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read in my posts. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately.

37
Studying for the LSAT / Re: OMG I got sick before the test.
« on: October 03, 2008, 11:39:37 AM »
You aren't sick. You are an LSAT machine. Machines can't get sick.

Don't allow yourself to even consider the possibility that being sick could affect your performance on the LSAT. Not now. Don't even consider that possibility until after the exam when you are deciding if you will keep or cancel your score.

 You will take the test tomorrow. You will nail it. You aren't sick. You will do great.

I was lucky enough to watch Tiger Woods 4th round play on June 15th, the day before my LSAT. (see: http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-1874232128237005363&ei=RVXmSMGeDIuE-wG-m_miAw&q=tiger+woods+US+OPEN&vt=lf ) His knee was hurting so bad that he couldn't hit the ball without nearly collapsing in agony. Still, he never considered the possibility of quitting. He never considered the possibility of failure. He maintained focus throughout the round. Despite his injury. Despite the crowds of thousands. He maintained focus and pushed through the pain. There is something inspiring about excellence per se. Get inspired to CRUSH the LSAT tomorrow.

38
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Somebody please define this for me.
« on: August 12, 2008, 05:37:23 PM »
I have noticed that as I go through PT's, a problem I am having is not understand some of the answer choices in the flaw questions.

What does it mean when the answer choice says "Presupposes what it sets out to prove" or "presupposes what it sets out to establish"

Also, I have learned to identify some key flaws based on the language used in the passage. I.e, if they say "john can only have 3 apples" I should look for something with an alternate possibility in the answer choice.

What type of signs should I be looking for  when these "presupposes what it sets out to establish" answers are the correct answers?

Thanks everyone,
Rita
 :)

See The Logical Reasoning Bible, Page 375 for a full and detailed description of this common "Circular Reasoning" flaw.

39
It seems like only the super gifted and lsat obsessed talk about their experiences on chat rooms. I got a 3.3 gpa from an average public state university.  I didnt have any time to practice for my lsats so I did what everyone tells you not to do and took the lsat with no preparation and scored a 150. If 50% of all students taking the lsat score below a 151 where are they? Do they just give up and not go to law school? Its almost impossible to find a descent law school with an lsat score below the mid 150s.  Everyone on these boards seems so elitist.  You know there are people out there that just want to get into a state school, graduate with minimal debt, and work for a small firm because they have an interest in law and not just the money.  Where are those people at?  For the record, I am taking the lsat again in October and I just started studying and I will probably only take two real practice tests and do about 2/3 hrs of studying a week.  I know it seems obsurd to most of you, but to those with jobs, school, and a social its simply reality.

Of course the LSAT-obsessed are the ones who spend time on a forum entitled "Studying for the LSAT." A person with only a casual interest in the LSAT would be unlikely to end up here at all, and certainly wouldn't spend the time required to integrate themselves into the community.

Furthermore, there is a significant causal relationship between studying and preparing for the LSAT and performing well on the LSAT. People who spend a great deal of time here probably do so because they spend a great deal of time prepping and studying for the LSAT, which significantly increases the chances that they will perform highly on test day. Perhaps it isn't because we are super-geniuses that we post on LSD, but rather, perhaps it is because we post on LSD that we are, in your estimation, super-geniuses. I don't think I could've gotten a 177 without all of the advice that I received on here.

You aspire for mediocrity and criticize me for wanting something more.
We all have jobs, school, and social lives or else we wouldn't be competitive law school applicants. Yet we still manage to fit LSAT prep into our schedule. You are no different than anyone else. Life is all about priorities, consider re-evaluating yours.
If your goal is to get into a state school and graduate with minimal debt, don't you think you should be working EVEN HARDER on your LSAT prep so that you might be eligible for scholarships?

40
Thanks for the solid advice. If you don't mind, could you explain what you did when reviewing sections on completed tests? I've been writing down question types that I consistently get wrong, but I'd like to be able to get to the point at which I can easily recognize the tricks consistently used by test makers, particularly in LR. I consistently finish LG w/ like 6-8 minutes left, so I mostly have to work on eliminating careless mistakes in the other two sections. You're right about the need to not neglect RC. I try not to, but it's so painfully boring that it's hard to force myself to review it. It's probably the easiest section, when I actually am able to pay attention to the passages.

When reviewing, ask yourself 2 questions:

1) What am I missing?
Are you missing specific question types? (eg. Must Be True/Assumption/Flaw/etc.)
Are you missing questions with formal logic elements?
Are you missing questions with heavy conditional reasoning elements?
Are you missing questions with numbers and percentages?
Are you missing questions that deal with technical nomenclature?
Are you missing questions that deal with science/economics/law/etc.?

If you can key in on the specific content of the types of problems that you are having trouble with, then you can work on developing an effective strategy for attacking those types of problems.


2) Why am I missing this/these question(s)?

Are you having timing issues and only missing questions when you are rushing at the end of the section? (focus on timing)
Are you misreading? (focus on attention to detail)
Are you misunderstanding the stimuli? (focus on attention to detail)
Did you get frustrated?  (focus on mental/emotional strength & stamina)
Did you lose focus? (focus on mental/emotional strength & stamina)
Is there a more effective way that you could've attacked the problem? (focus on approach)
Did you misunderstand and/or mis-diagram the relationship between elements in the stimuli? (focus on attention to detail/conditional reasoning/formal logic)
Did you narrow the answer choices down to the correct answer choice and the answer choice that you incorrectly selected? Why did you choose the incorrect answer choice? Why was it attractive? Are you choosing the same types of incorrect answers over and over? (ie. opposite answers, shell game answers, out of scope answers, etc. [pp.225 LRB])

Look for patterns in your mistakes, many people make similar errors time and time again because they don't realize what they are having trouble with and why they are making errors.

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