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Messages - AssaultAndBattery

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31
Studying and Exam Taking / Re: 0L - Suggested pre-study ?
« on: December 14, 2007, 04:57:14 PM »
Two questions: Did anyone read/study content before starting as a 1L (assuming not coming from a pre-law undergrad)? Along those lines, is there content I can put onto my video iPod to watch while working out?

I don't want to buy the textbooks and read them, but I'd like to review some of the content (like course outlines) so that way I walk into class already knowledgeable about some of the stuff I need to know so that it'll be a little easier to take it all in then.  Perhaps listening to podcasts while I work out or have a book like one of the Kaplan 1L study guides.

What did you use and what did you find useful?


Just Stop. Listen to me. I was like you months ago, believing I would get a head start on this law school game. I read everything that was suggested pre 1L reading material, Law school confidential, planet law school, law school for dummies, you name it, I read it. I dished out money for a pre-1L course as well.

I should have spent those precious weeks and months getting completely smashed and drunk to the point that I thought I was going to medical school instead.

No matter what you do before lawschool, you will not know what you are in for until you experience the first rounds of finals. This coming from me, a 1L who will be done with his last final in 4 hours.

I am not trying to scare you but instead just trying to provide you with friendly advice, enjoy your days before law school starts. GOODLUCK

32
So yeah, I have this thing in 2 hours. It feels like I am going in blindfolded as there was nothing to study and they will be testing us on briefing cases and writing.

Anyone else have a weird final like this? I should be drunk already after my last REAL final. Cheers to all who finish there finals today!!!   :D

33
General Board / Re: Learinng disability's in law school
« on: December 14, 2007, 02:43:28 AM »
I have dyslexia. Really bad dyslexia, like I could not read or write my own name until I was ten. It never goes away. Quite frankly it makes law school much harder for me than most of my classmates. Everything I write comes out backwards or jumbled. Just about every other word in this post is underlined in red on MS Word. Writing is an extremely frustrating experience for a person with dyslexia as bad as mine is.

Dyslexia is covered under the ADA. The standard accommodation in law school is time and half or double time on exams, depending on your diagnosis. For dyslexia, you must provide the school with an evaluation done by an educational psychologist. Moreover, you must get a new one every five years. The evaluation consists of two days of testing and costs about $3,500 the last time I did it. If you don’t want the extra time, you can also ask for non-standard accommodations. These must be approved by your schools disability office.

I asked for the ability to type my exams in MS Word (rather than Exam 4) because the spell checker in Exam 4 would explode trying to proof my writing. I asked for extra time only to run the spell checker after I was done. Therefore, for my exams I go to the registrar’s office, they give me a loner laptop with MS Word on it. I take my exam (and they put us in a room with other accommodated testers), I finish the exam in the same time as everyone else (whose is not accommodated), and then I get the extra time to run the spell checker (but not change any answers). As far as I know I’m the only person at my school with dyslexia, the rest are ADHD or physical disabilities (this is not surprising since less than 10% of dyslexics even make it through undergrad, much less on to grad school).

Running the spell checker on a typical 3-hour essay exam takes me about two hours. This is because 90% of time I have so jumbled the letters that MS Word cannot figure out what I am trying to spell. So I have to keep putting in different versions until something “clicks.” The biggest problem for me is that as a dyslexic I don’t see things as misspelled, the word looks “right” to my brain, so having MS Word pick them out as misspelled is essential, otherwise I would never notice them.

The main place my dyslexia affects me is writing (it does effect my reading as well, but I read as fast as most non-dyslexics even though I have to translate everything first, so this is not much of an issue in law school). Because I write slower than most and have to double and triple check my writing, I know this is going to be an issue when I look for a permanent job. Thus, I make sure I am as d**mn a good writer as I can be. I take as many writing classes as I can in law school, I’m on law review, I have been published eight times so far in law reviews, and have entered a bunch of legal writing contests. I also Am Jured my Legal Writing class 1L, and had my brief nominated for best of the 1L class. I do this, even though I HATE writing (if you are not dyslexic you really cannot conceive of how frustrating and time consuming it is) because I know I am going to have to say to a prospective employers “Look, I write slower than most, but I also write better than most.” I am hoping that having the writing accolades will make up for me being slower. So far it has worked.

I will just end this by saying, at least for people with dyslexia; the accommodations do not give them any advantage at all. They still have to work harder than most of their classmates. I guarantee you if you could get inside my brain for one exam, you would give up any extra time just to be “normal” again.  I’ll also add I have ADHD too, but I take meds for that, so I don’t ask for any accommodations, if they made a pill for dyslexia, I would take that in a second.


More Power to you. You are NOT abusing the system for your own personal advantage. You have a legitimate disablity and I am all in favor of providing whatever it is you need to be placed on a level playing field with the rest of the class. However, those that take UNFAIR advantage, and are trying to play on there own field, I find that to be dishonest and a blatant abuse of the system.

Does anyone know if you are allowed extra time on the bar exam?

34
General Board / Re: Learinng disability's in law school
« on: December 14, 2007, 02:41:01 AM »
I think its a bunch of crap. I am pretty sure I have ADD. I know alot of people who have it, who don't take meds for it, and just go on with there lives in law school. This chick at my lawschool claimed to have ADD and got that turned into a learning disablity and got 2 hours extra on each final AND got to take the test in an empty room all for herself.  >:(
What's worse is she appeared to be one of the students who understood the material in class the best and for the early graded assignments that we had, she scored the highest. It just seems this was an added advantage for her.



Do you get extra time on the bar exam if you have a learning disablity?

Yes-you surely do. Perhaps she was on ritalin the whole time she was doing well


I know her and have hung out with her. She does not take ritalin. 

35
General Board / Re: Learinng disability's in law school
« on: December 13, 2007, 04:21:33 PM »
I think its a bunch of crap. I am pretty sure I have ADD. I know alot of people who have it, who don't take meds for it, and just go on with there lives in law school. This chick at my lawschool claimed to have ADD and got that turned into a learning disablity and got 2 hours extra on each final AND got to take the test in an empty room all for herself.  >:(
What's worse is she appeared to be one of the students who understood the material in class the best and for the early graded assignments that we had, she scored the highest. It just seems this was an added advantage for her.



Do you get extra time on the bar exam if you have a learning disablity?

36
Hello everyone,

Goodluck to all those studying and getting ready for finals. I have my civpro final in 5 days and finally things are starting to click except for that god forsaken erie doctrine.


Does anyone have any tips, resources, suggestions, with the erie doctrine? I am not looking to supplements this far into the game, but I just was looking for some clear answers for one, in a fact pattern, when should I realize that I have an erie question on my hand? Also, perhaps some black letter rules for erie that are the most important. Thanks in advance, sorry if this was incoherent, I am studying for a different class.


37
Yes.  It's all about the 'can do' attitude.  Attitude is what will make you or break you. That, and planning.  Congratulations, Camelbx.

Hello Susan,

Regarding salaries, what is the average salary of a lawyer who goes solo?

I know it will vary, based on region, experience, and such. But after all that, what is the salary range?

Thanks..

38
General Board / Re: New TV, LCD or Plasma?
« on: November 20, 2007, 01:23:36 AM »
Consider DLP.


Seriously, I have Both a DLP and a Plasma.


The DLP, was less expensive, and provides a clearer, brighter, more enjoyable picture over the pricer plasma. With DLP's when the bulb goes bad in 5 years, you can get a replacement for $100 bucks and you are back in business. With a plasma, I believe repairs are alot more costly.

Plasmas are nice because they are space saviors (mine hangs on the wall). However, in terms of picture quality, DLP all the way. Watching ESPN in HD on my DLP is amazing. Sometimes I feel like I am actually in the game.  ;)

39
General Board / Re: Length of your outlines
« on: November 19, 2007, 01:22:53 AM »
Mine are generally 40-50 pages long; occasionally it will be longer if the course was particularly dense.  I think I've had a couple of 60 page outlines here and there.  I usually make a very short 1-2 page checklist/skeleton outline of every cause of action (like torts or crim) OR for the entire course for something like contracts.

I've always erred on the side of including things rather than cutting something out just to shorten it.  I tab the crap out of my outlines, highlight things and add handwritten notes after printing them out to highlight really important stuff.  I also read through them numerous times, and shorten up here and there, reword things, minimize things I absolutely know.

I use my outlines for each and every open book exam I have; I see no point in memorizing things just so I can walk in with a 10 page outlines.  That's not to say I don't know the material backwards and forwards.  I do.  I just don't expend the mental energy to memorize.

So the fact that your outline is longer isn't a big deal; whatever is comfortable for you is what you should do.  Outlining is very personal and what works for me would drive other people nuts.


Thanks!! Good to know there is someone else out there with 40+ page length outlines..

40
General Board / Re: Length of your outlines
« on: November 18, 2007, 08:31:56 PM »
My outlines will probably mostly be between 20-30 pages when i get them completely finished - i think length depends on a couple of things: how many credits of the particular course you are taking this semester, what kind of indentation you are using etc...personally - my outlines are very dense - i don't double space - and don't start new lines unless i'm making a new point---in general, i think everyone will be different, we are all comfortable with different formats etc...if you have 40-50 pages of straight dense text, you may want to think about cutting down on the info - otherwise do what you are comfortable with.


Thanks. That makes me feel better. Mine is very spacious. I like it to be easy on the eyes, so I will skip lines alot. I will skip lines when starting a new topic and I will indent on important things. Mine is not condensed.

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