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Messages - Gwiz

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11
Current Law Students / Re: What was your undergrad major?
« on: August 03, 2007, 06:43:22 AM »
 Finance and International Business Administration (double major), French Linguist Certificate/Diploma,

12
Pennsylvania State / Re: computer specs
« on: August 02, 2007, 01:44:24 PM »
I thought I saw outlets, but I can't remember.  You should e-mail someone in admin.

13
Pennsylvania State / Re: Class of 2010
« on: August 01, 2007, 10:36:42 AM »
Just got an e-mail from my mentor...  And so it begins.

14
Current Law Students / Re: Question on Tiers...
« on: July 31, 2007, 02:38:09 PM »
If you're not sure you want to go to school this fall, you need to decide soon before you end up in debt for nothing. Of if you are on scholarship, you end up jobless for nothing.

I admire you wanting to do the right thing for your daughter... I think if you were seriously considering a legal career, Penn would be an obvious choice. You'd find the childcare help you needed and your daughter would adjust to a new place. It might be harder in the short term, but the long term rewards stand to be much higher.

Williamette is a good local choice, however, and a good choice for practicing law in your region, though. You and your daughter have the emotional benefit of being in a familiar place and local family support.

Once you have graduated and practiced for a good number of years, where you went to school matters a lot less. What you have done in the time since matters more. The opportunties coming out of Williamette will not be as great as Penn, but you certainly are in an under-served legal market. So the opportunities for a local grad in this market would be greater than a more saturated location like Chicago or NYC.

Good luck with your decision whether or not to attend Williamette this fall. That is the most important decision factor at this stage in the game-- and one you need to make for yourself.
I like this response I will increase your reputation.

15
Current Law Students / Re: How to improve writing?
« on: July 31, 2007, 08:58:10 AM »
The best way to improve your writing is to increase your reading. You have to love to read before you become a truly good writer.

Disagree.  Reading is not the same as writing.  Reading involves recognition, whereas writing involves mostly "reproduction".  One cannot reproduce sometimes, even things he has perfectly memorized.  For example, one can easily distinguish between British and American accent, but often cannot produce both.

I disagree with this disagreement. I submit that writing is simply an extension of reading. And your example about accents is inapplicable because speech is a very different process than thought. Reading and writing occur entirely in our minds. The paper is just recording that process.

Reading a book about writing may be useful, and I can see why an engineer would be inclined to do so (since they learn everything mechanically). However, I am absolutely certain that the best way to improve your prose is to read, enjoy, and reflect upon the prose of others. Don't set out to "learn" how to write better; set out to experience great writing.


Read more and  practice writing.  Transcribing what you read can also help.  You got in with your personal statement, and (if they read it) your writing sample.  The admissions committee thinks your writing is competative with your classmates.  I still think you may be better at it than you think.

Reading the cases, and briefing them everyday may help you as well. 

16
Current Law Students / Re: How to improve writing?
« on: July 31, 2007, 06:15:53 AM »
how about this book:

http://www.amazon.com/Elements-Style-Fourth-William-Strunk/dp/0205313426/ref=si3_rdr_bb_product/002-7370244-0466420

Did you read the table of contents?  It seems a little basic to me.  You should just take one of those adult classes  on writing in your neighborhood.  You could also just write something on your own and get your favorite professor to critique the writing.  Practice, practice, practice.  You're probably not as bad off as you think, and I heard legal writing is a totally different animal.

17
Current Law Students / Re: Question Members
« on: July 30, 2007, 03:51:34 PM »
Both.

Pocket to use, hardbound full to sit on my shelf and impress people with how difficult the study of law is.

Exactly!  ;D
Nice!

18
Current Law Students / Re: 12 Hours A DAY?
« on: July 28, 2007, 08:40:56 AM »
Tag

19
Current Law Students / Re: Question on Tiers...
« on: July 28, 2007, 08:11:47 AM »
I think you made a good decision based on your needs, and your goals.  :) What they think on this board does not matter.  You really shouldn't concern yourself with snobbery.  That is the norm for any profession, and in all walks of life. If that bothers you you're going to have a tough time in everything you do.  I'm sure the rest of them could care less about what you think of thier choices. 

I didn't pay attention to the ranking until I got acceptances.  I based my choices on my personal goals.  I'd say about 10% of the Profs at my school whent to my school, and maybe 20% Harvard, and Yale.  Everyone where I live (Philly) went to Temple, Villanova, Dickinson, and Penn in that order of choice.  I was told by close friends who are practicing attorneys in big law, and solo to avoid Penn if I want to be a big shot in Philly.  Mind you I'm a non-trad as well, so my situation is somewhat unique.  I already have an established business, and a legal client list for when I graduate (If I go solo right away).

The best business managers will look beyond the school you went to, read your sample writing, and insist on meeting you.  I wouldn't want to work with or for someone who's dumb enough to assume I am intelligent just because I went to a T14 (or for non lawyers - L.S.).  That's bad mojo.



20
Pennsylvania State / Re: Class of 2010
« on: July 26, 2007, 08:05:52 AM »
Did anyone else find the email from financial aid just a tad bit insulting to their adult sensibilities? 

Don't get me wrong.  I do find such sage advice as "Using the library instead of bookstores and movie rental stores and brown-bagging your lunch are a couple of simple ways to keep your expenses low" incredibly compelling. I think, however, that anyone capable of completing an undergraduate degree, then completing the process of applying and getting accepted to law school will be able to solve such complex financial conundrums without the emails from mommy reminding them to save money.  I fully expect further emails along the line with tips such as "studying hard and attending class are sure ways to improve your grade point average," and "leaving a little early in the morning is a fun and easy way to make sure that you are on time for class."  Perhaps we could hire a medical consultant to write to us that "eating right and getting more sleep are a few simple cures for law school exhaustion."  How could we possible navigate the maze of 1L without such sound little notes from the pen of experience?

Okay, rant over.  I feel better now.

You will never get emails telling your to arrive to class ontime, only the financial aid department feels the need to treat you like a child -- and career services will too, but that is necessary.

And while I agree that this particular email seemed condescending, you will find very shortly that law school, like every other level of education, has its share of idiots. (You will discover that there are students in law school that have no idea how a bill becomes law, trust me.  Or, have no basic idea of the federal judiciary, things I thought every law student should know before they arrived)  But having said that, many students are fresh from undergraduate who have never lived outside mommy and daddy's protection.  I was shocked recently by a fellow 3L asking me how much he/she should borrow for living expenses because he/she never had to pay them before now.  Considering the sizable amount of money it costs to go to PSU, you should feel happy that financial aid attempts to in every way help you figure out how to save money. 
We have a federal Judiciary ??? . I thought everything over the State Supreme Court was Mob rule!  :o

I'm glad they sent that info.  I already developed a budget, but It reminded me to go back and redo some of the figures.  I've been on a spending spree this last week.  My auto insurance has dropped, and my rental payment is exactly at my budgeted high limit.  I took my pooch to the vet and he needed an extra vaccination I didn't budget for but I was prepared with a buffer and extra savings during my spending spree (and donations from the fam and friends).  I haven't even started on my  books, and school supplies.  I still need a bed, and the are a dozen little things I need.  I have to have this all hashed out, and determine my fixed costs before I order my cable and internet.

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