Law School Discussion

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General Board / Re: how do law schools view online undergraduate degrees?
« on: December 03, 2007, 02:05:43 PM »
I don't really think someone who completed their degree online is in a great position to say whether the general public finds them equivalent... of course you think so, and you at least sure as hell hope so.

Like I said, a T3 or T4 school won't care.  Employers probably will.


Perhaps you should ask someone who actually hires people if they care... so far of the 15 that I've asked, only 1 said they even looked at the college. All they care is that you have a degree, unless you went to a college that means something to them (i.e. the school they went to). Employers just like experience and the degree. The college I went to is a brick and mortar college, but I completed their online program. There is no indication that I did not go to school at their campus. Anyone who thinks that any online program is easier, or less prestigious than any normal college that the majority of people go to, then you are a fool that has not done research. Most people who go to law school live in this educational bubble and they can't see into their future career. If you are going to be a lawyer, then employers will only care about the law school you went to. If you are not going to be a lawyer, then the degree will look impressive enough.

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General Board / Re: how do law schools view online undergraduate degrees?
« on: December 03, 2007, 01:40:20 PM »

Are you kidding me? You clearly have no knowledge of online programs. Online programs are not less stringent. Perhaps the FOR PROFIT schools like University of Phoenix is, but actual schools that are accredited and are not for profit are more stringent then many brick and mortar schools. Ask anyone who has taken classes at a brick and mortar facility and taken a class online and they will tell you that they had to do WAY more work for the online class. Do some research instead of throwing your pitiful excuse for an opinion at everyone please.

How many times do I have to say that different programs have different degrees of reputation?  Generally speaking online degrees are looked down upon.  End of story.  I feel sorry for the lamb that was slaughtered to print your AIU degree.  Perhaps if you work on your reading comprehension you'll be able to get a Kaplan law degree.



Your posts continue to show your ignorance to anything out of the ordinary. You will eventually be lost in the change to the future. Good luck with that.

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General Board / Re: how do law schools view online undergraduate degrees?
« on: December 02, 2007, 02:21:49 PM »
Think about this:

Which would you rather have when applying?

2.1/177
3.9/150

Try this...

You have one spot remaining unfilled, the next two people up on the waiting list are:

Jack - University of Illinois - computer science - 164/3.06
John - Devry University Online - computer information systems - 163/3.87

Who do you offer it to?

(This is a trick question - nobody who went to Devry would score over a 150)


First of all, generalizing that anyone who went to one school to a single max in LSAT score is a bit petty. Second of all, of course they woudl take the UofI guy in this scenario, and I clearly stated that being borderline with someone else is the only time your school even comes into play. Third of all, if the school was not known to be an online school like Devry or the University of Phoenix then it could go either way. And fourth of all, no degree from an online program actually has the word "online" anywhere on the diploma. Most people will not know that you did an online program unless you said it.

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General Board / Re: how do law schools view online undergraduate degrees?
« on: December 02, 2007, 02:19:01 PM »

Reconcile the difference: because online schools are known to be less stringent and  restrictive in the quality of students they admit and in their grading structures.  It's nothing to do with being brick and mortar it's because they graduate anyone with a pulse and money, and I'm not sure about the pulse. 

I've also stated that online programs have their own reputations of quality.  Those associated with traditional schools are much better regarded than those who are strictly online and private who are known for graduating anyone.




Are you kidding me? You clearly have no knowledge of online programs. Online programs are not less stringent. Perhaps the FOR PROFIT schools like University of Phoenix is, but actual schools that are accredited and are not for profit are more stringent then many brick and mortar schools. Ask anyone who has taken classes at a brick and mortar facility and taken a class online and they will tell you that they had to do WAY more work for the online class. Do some research instead of throwing your pitiful excuse for an opinion at everyone please.

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General Board / Re: how do law schools view online undergraduate degrees?
« on: December 02, 2007, 12:01:56 AM »
I think it's rather ignorant to assume the admissions people, whose job it is to evaluate thousands of applications a year, wouldn't be cognizant of undergraduate institutions and their relative reputation of quality. 

That said, even online schools have varying degrees of reputation.  I think it would be not be as beneficial as a degree from, say, Harvard if you were applying to a T1, but the lower down on the totem pole you get the less they will care.  From what I can tell of the bottom tier schools, they'd take you as long as you have a pulse and money... and i'm not too sure about that pulse requirement. 


This is not accurate at all. The admissions department really only care about your LSAT, and then they care a little bit about your GPA. This is true for any school. If you are borderline they will look at soft factors, but that is about it. Obviously a guy that got a 3.6 from Harvard is going to be taken on the border over a guy who got a 3.6 from a less recognized school. There are only a few schools that will take you if you have a pulse and money, all are currently T4's... Every school turns down applicants every year though. About half of the applicants who apply to law school get in nowhere.


TITCR.  Law school admission is overwhelmingly based on LSAT, then to a much lesser extent UGPA, then school's reputation is almost a non-factor.  The only way your UG matter is if you went to Harvard and they want to brag that Harvard grads attend their law school.

Wrong!  Sakuli responds to an argument about the weight of the LSAT over other factors that was not part of the original statement.  Nowhere do I state that the reputation of the school trumps LSAT or UGPA.  I  even say that it becomes less relevant for the less prestigious schools, nowhere saying to what extent that relevancy originally had except that Harvard will hold a higher weight over University of Phoenix.

I have five years work experience with e-learning institutions.  As far as reputation goes, brick and mortar (especially top tier) will trump the online schools.  Doesn't mean that that is a significant factor, but it is out there. 



Wow this is real accurate. I'm sure that any school is considered better than other schools because they either do not offer online degrees, or they just have four walls that students actually come to every day. Genius. No one with any knowledge of online degrees frowns upon them as long as they come from accredited schools. They teach the students just as well, but some studies show better, than brick and mortar schools. Comparing Harvard is not accurate, because most people do not go to an Ivy league school. Most online degrees will be viewed as any other small college that is not prestigious. It is like the other poster said, if you have a 177 LSAT they could care less where you went to school, or what your GPA was.

And to respond to Peaches... you do not see people in your law school from online schools or small colleges because most of the people that go to law school do not go to undergraduate schools like that. It will not bring down your chances at getting into law school, and just the fact that you do not see any of them is no reason against the schools. Most people who go to law school are prestige whores, and therefore they are people that are more likely to go to prestigious undergraduate college.

The fact is that it will not hurt you. Going to a prestigious school might help you, but going getting your degree will not hurt you. Obviously wherever you want to go to law school will view their state schools and schools in the area as prestigious and that might help you, but other schools won't hurt you. A good example is that I know a guy who went to a top 15 liberal arts college. He has worked in 5 states and none of his employers have ever heard of his undergraduate school even though it is so well regarded. People just do not care that much. Bottom line is nail the LSAT and you're in law school.

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General Board / Re: how do law schools view online undergraduate degrees?
« on: November 24, 2007, 10:47:40 AM »
I think it's rather ignorant to assume the admissions people, whose job it is to evaluate thousands of applications a year, wouldn't be cognizant of undergraduate institutions and their relative reputation of quality. 

That said, even online schools have varying degrees of reputation.  I think it would be not be as beneficial as a degree from, say, Harvard if you were applying to a T1, but the lower down on the totem pole you get the less they will care.  From what I can tell of the bottom tier schools, they'd take you as long as you have a pulse and money... and i'm not too sure about that pulse requirement. 


This is not accurate at all. The admissions department really only care about your LSAT, and then they care a little bit about your GPA. This is true for any school. If you are borderline they will look at soft factors, but that is about it. Obviously a guy that got a 3.6 from Harvard is going to be taken on the border over a guy who got a 3.6 from a less recognized school. There are only a few schools that will take you if you have a pulse and money, all are currently T4's... Every school turns down applicants every year though. About half of the applicants who apply to law school get in nowhere.

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General Board / Re: how do law schools view online undergraduate degrees?
« on: November 22, 2007, 11:48:02 AM »
I went to undergrad entirely online and got into law school this year. I'm at a Tier 3, but am in Law School. My LSAT was crap too, so it can be done easily coming with a decent LSAT. The only law schools that are likely to know the difference in the school are the ones actually in Maryland, or really close by. I doubt they will care if your LSAT is good though. Many studies have been done and online Undergrads are considered to be just as good, if not better, in teaching students. You should not have a problem, unless your LSAT is below a 150, but that is an entirely different subject.

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Southern Illinois - Carbondale / Re: SIU 2010
« on: April 13, 2007, 03:00:05 PM »
I would say that is very unreliable.  Check firm websites and see how many SIU grads are at big firms in comparison to alum from U of I, Loyola, and Depaul.  No Comparison.  Also look at the SIU OCI firm list... ::)

Spoken like someone who depends on their school to get a job. Do you know where Carbondale is? Why would many Big Firms travel that far when they have so many Law Schools in the city? There is no point. Most of SIU grads go back to their hometowns to practice, or into government. Many want to go to Springfield or St.Louis the small percentage that want to go to Chicago get jobs very easily. They are highly respected for some reason. This source is telling the truth. If SIU was located in the northern part of the state the numbers would show this. Even if you are right I would rather have a degree that did not cost as much, and is highly respected rather than a hell of expensive one that is about the same respected. Your school might help you get your first job, but then you are on your own.

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Southern Illinois - Carbondale / Re: SIU 2010
« on: April 13, 2007, 09:51:43 AM »
bump

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Southern Illinois - Carbondale / SIU 2010
« on: April 12, 2007, 04:13:57 PM »
Who's coming with me?


On a side note I had a Chicago lawyer rank the Illinois school in how his big firm respects them. Here's the list:

1. Chicago
2. Northwestern
3. Kent
4. SIU
5. Loyola
6. U of I
7. DePaul
8. John Marshall
9. Northern Illinois

He said that U of I expects to place in Chicago where SIU graduates actually work for it. I don't know how reliable that is but it is one firm's opinion.

So again.. Who's coming with me?!

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