Law School Discussion

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Messages - VitaminE

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11
General Board / Re: Getting a mortgage while living off student loans
« on: April 04, 2007, 05:16:45 PM »
Yeah. I figured...

Well, let's cross our fingers that my S.O.'s income IS enough to qualify :)

12
General Board / Getting a mortgage while living off student loans
« on: April 04, 2007, 04:57:47 PM »
We are considering refinancing our mortgage, but my S.O.'s salary probably won't be enough to qualify us. We will probably need to use my "income" too.

My "income" = Stafford loans and money from a paid public-interest clerkship over the summer (slightly higher than a Wal-Mart cashier's wage).

Has anyone refinanced using student loans as income?


13
St. Thomas (Minnesota) / Re: U of Saint Thomas vs. William Mitchell
« on: April 02, 2007, 09:39:53 AM »
To suggest that William Mitchell is not respected by local lawyers or professors shows a shocking naivete about the legal Twin Cities legal market.  William Mitchell has a tremendous alumni base in all sorts different legal sectors in the Twin Cities.  Take a look at the major firms, they have solid Mitchell representation, not to mention our members on the State supreme court, the state court of appeals and the current Attorney General.  One faculty member leaving really doesn't seem to discount any of this.  William Mitchell has been a sold Tier 3 for a while, it's slip to T4 was not the norm.  Hiring seven new faculty shows that the school is by no means hurting.  Particularly impressive is the IP curriculum (which includes the author a treatise and a new hiring of a major international patent figure).  I am not saying the school does not have its flaws, it is no the U of M and does not pretend to be.  But I find this smack talking from St. Thomas students a bit presumptious.  I have heard many fine things about your school, I know you have some top notch faculty and I have seen your great building.  I am happy that you opened at Tier 3.  But for you to suggest that you are leagues better than Mitchell just a few years into your existence is really not something you can support.  I am sure St. Thomas will use its deep pockets to build a solid alumni base, I just resent misinformation being spread about my school (that it is not respected).  Mitchell has the alumni and the backing to keep its solid rep, if anything it will be Hamline squeezed out (which has some fine programs as well, just less money).  I am merely concerned that new St. Thomas students feel the need to denigrate other area law schools in such an arrogant and erroneous fashion.  I am sure this is not the norm, but only the reflection of those individuals that have done so here.

I concur.

14
General Board / Re: Political Science Advantage...
« on: March 30, 2007, 06:20:45 AM »

In a good PoliSci paper, you need to think of counterarguments for anything that you say and rebut them. Also, because you learn so many different theories, you learn to accept the fact that there are 2 sides (at least) to every issue. You learn that there is never a black and white answer. You learn that you need to use reasoning to prove a point in a paper. You learn to see everything from so many different perspectives and ask the very questions that come in handy in law school. Also, I think that cranking out papers all of the time for Political Science prepared me for law school. I have scored above average on every legal writing assignment this year.



????  Am I the only poly/sci major here who didn't even begin his/her undergrad "poly/sci papers" until I ran out of beer the night before it was due??  I can honestly say, none of what this person said ever even crossed my mind while writing these things.  I highly doubt any undergrad, at least the ones I know, approached their assignments in any way that would prepare them for law school (However, the copious amounts of alcohol consumed did prepare us for the second year of law school).

There were many times that I procrastinated a paper until the night before it was due (or even the morning of). The same has been true with my legal writing assignments, though :) Many of the undergrad PoliSci students I knew were quite brilliant (myself excluded from this). So the undergrad students that I knew actually did approach their assignments in a way that sort of prepared them for law school or graduate work.

15
General Board / Re: Political Science Advantage...
« on: March 29, 2007, 07:33:22 PM »
I actually think that some skills that I learned in my PoliSci courses ARE useful in law school. Prior to law school, I had never seen a casebook. I focused on International Politics and Political Theory in undergrad. The analytical thinking that you learn in Political Science is very useful when you are in law school. The papers that I had to write for my undergrad major prepared me for law school.

In a good PoliSci paper, you need to think of counterarguments for anything that you say and rebut them. Also, because you learn so many different theories, you learn to accept the fact that there are 2 sides (at least) to every issue. You learn that there is never a black and white answer. You learn that you need to use reasoning to prove a point in a paper. You learn to see everything from so many different perspectives and ask the very questions that come in handy in law school. Also, I think that cranking out papers all of the time for Political Science prepared me for law school. I have scored above average on every legal writing assignment this year.

However, if I could go back and do it over I probably would have studied engineering or business. The career prospects with a law degree + finance or engineering are probably better than those with a PoliSci degree.

As for students who come to school knowing case law: I know a few "Pre-Law" Poli Sci program students (my school did not have a pre-law program). They do not have the best grades in the class. So I wouldn't be too worried about your roommate's knowledge of case law/common law. Law school is a completely different game.

16
General Board / Re: What does the SBA do at your school?
« on: March 20, 2007, 12:07:00 PM »
Does the SBA have an actual impact at anyone's school? Or is it more "lip service" than anything else? I'm trying to decide if I should even bother voting in the upcoming SBA election. 

Law school SBA is for those who did not get elected as class secretary sophomore year in high school.

Haha  ;D

I think there may be some truth to that statement.

If only we had a Law Prom King and Queen, then I could really re-experience high school :)

17
General Board / What does the SBA do at your school?
« on: March 20, 2007, 09:56:38 AM »
I cannot figure out what the SBA has actually accomplished at my school this year. The SBA elections are coming up, and I don't understand why our school needs 10 SBA reps for 2L and 3L students.

They put on our Fall and Spring "law prom", and they also sent out emails complaining about grading curves, cost of tuition, class schedule, etc. Then they met with school admin regarding these issues, and nothing changed.

Does the SBA have an actual impact at anyone's school? Or is it more "lip service" than anything else? I'm trying to decide if I should even bother voting in the upcoming SBA election. 




18
I replied to your post on the William Mitchell specific board, but I must say that I am happy with my decision to go here. I also think that the fact that you have a family makes Mitchell an excellent choice. Flexible scheduling, other students who are parents, and the school's focus on "practical wisdom".

This link shows the activities that students (and the public) can go to at William Mitchell (and non-students too).
http://www.wmitchell.edu/docket/

Maybe you could go to a talk or an activity for some more insight? Also, if you accept a scholarship from any of these schools, pay attention to the GPA you're required to keep. And then find out what the school's curve is set at. I was offered scholarships at all 3 private schools. I know several people who chose Mitchell based on their scholarship offer (even over the U). Some people thought the scholarship would be easy to keep. After exam grades came back, though, some are worried about "stepping up their game" for Spring semester in order to keep theirs. My point is that if Hamline offers you a scholarship, that is a motivating factor for studying there. However, pay attention to where students get employed after attending there, what the different starting salaries are, etc. If you are happy with that information, then attend there. But I wouldn't completely base my decision on a scholarship offer. Also, you could TRY to see (if Hamline offers you $) whether Mitchell or St. Thomas would be willing to offer you anything. Sometimes after you have an acceptance and a scholarship from another school, another school might offer you something.

Alright, I don't know if this was really that helpful. All in all, I just want to say that I am really happy with my experience at William Mitchell, and I definitely would encourage other students to attend this school.

Good luck with your decision :)



19
Socratic Method / Re: New blog for law students
« on: January 29, 2007, 07:39:50 PM »
I also can relate to it... Quite funny... Especially some of the links :) Much better than working on my legal writing assignment!

20
I think it might not be a bad idea for you to try to meet with the career planning office at William Mitchell. I don't really know much about trademark/copyright law. I know it's a growing area of law (at least according to my property professor)... I sometimes get nervous because there are so many people going to law school, and I think our class had 3-400 people this year (at William Mitchell alone). With 4 law schools it can be a competitive market in the Twin Cities. I want to work in the legal field, though, so I am sticking it out.

Mitchell is a great school and is highly esteemed in the local community. Our writing classes are taught in small groups (about 10-12 students) by actual lawyers from the Twin Cities. I really like studying law, and I enjoy my classes and classmates.

As for the $80K plus in student loans, just remember student loan consolidation and the MN-LRAP program http://www.lrapmn.org/

Good luck with your decision.

Oh, and I wish I had known about this when I had decided to go to Mitchell. When you are signing up for your Section, be sure to check the schedule and the average grades (from past years) that each professor in the section gives out. I would switch sections to avoid Heidenreich for Contracts at all costs. He loves giving out Ds and Fs. Not good for the GPA.

http://www.wmitchell.edu/current/grades/mean0506.html
http://agresso.wmitchell.edu/information/inquiries/courselist.aspx

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