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Messages - Lindbergh

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81
LSAT horror stories / Re: Ridiculous buttplugs questions
« on: September 22, 2008, 12:43:10 AM »
nohomo

???

It's a novel slang term.

I was covering your back.


With lotion?  That sounds kind of "h" itself.


You should have prefaced your last comment with "nohomo".

Oh, okay.


That is of course, assuming that you are infact, not homo.

Hey, you're the one sending me PM's!    ;)

82
It's more obvious that you've never attended HLS (or know anyone who has) if you think an HLS student has to "network" with other students to obtain a public sector job. 
I disagree.  Networking is invaluable for HLS grads going into either the private or the public sector, and OPIA is devoting significant time and resources to creating and maintaining the connections that help HLS public interest students secure some of the most coveted positions in that sector.

Actually, in retrospect, this is true.  Very few HLS students obtain jobs through on-campus interviews, and most get them through friends they meet during school. 

In light of this error on my part, I'll wait for the OP to provide further guidance before posting further.


83
It's more obvious that you've never attended HLS (or know anyone who has) if you think an HLS student has to "network" with other students to obtain a public sector job. 
I disagree.  Networking is invaluable for HLS grads going into either the private or the public sector, and OPIA is devoting significant time and resources to creating and maintaining the connections that help HLS public interest students secure some of the most coveted positions in that sector.

Actually, in retrospect, this is true.  Very few HLS students obtain jobs through on-campus interviews, and most get them through friends they meet during school. 

In light of this, I'll wait for the OP to provide further guidance before posting further.

85
Yeah, as noted, there's never anything wrong with extra info, I just think it's vital that the OP understands the placement differential b/t HLS and lower T14 schools.  I'd be surprised if any HLS grads had much difficulty with SEC/Justice jobs, given that most HLS grads are seeking the top biglaw jobs.  Either way, there's no question that it's harder from GULC, where many students are seeking such jobs.

I'm also not sure how networking with other students would help much in obtaining government jobs -- it would seem internships, etc., would be the key for this, along with the most impressive degree possible.

I think you are making an unwarranted assumption that employers examine applicants in comparison only to their classmates and not to a larger pool of applicants from all schools. 

Actually, I'm not.  I'm rather making the warranted assumption that employers DO examine applicants in comparison to the larger pool, where HLS is basically the cream of the crop.  If they only compared them to their classmates, then this might be an argument for choosing GULC, as he'll probably do better relative to them than he would in the more competitive HLS student body.  You may or may not be making this unwarranted assumption, but it's not clear.


Indeed, all other things being equal, a school that sends more students to a particular agency may give its students the upper hand; the school has strong ties to the agency and its students are a known quantity. 

It might, except that a HLS degree is far more marketable than a GULC degree in pretty much every context.  It strains credibility to think that the SEC or DOJ would choose yet another less-qualified GULC applicant over an HLS applicant simply because GULC applicants have already flooded their organization with resumes and entry-level employees.  (Do D.C. Biglaw firms prefer GULC applicants over HLS grads just because GULC students have already flooded those firms?  No.)  The people who run these agencies aren't stupid, and they know which schools have the most rigorous entrance requirements, and the most competent graduates (generally speaking).  If anything, being a more rare HLS applicant would add desired diversity to their organization, even if they were peer schools -- which they're clearly not.


I'm not saying that this is enough to overcome the real advantage Harvard  students have over students from other schools in general. 

It's not, trust me.  I know plenty of students from both schools who have tried to do government work, and it's far easier for the HLS grads. 


I just think your reasoning is faulty. 

That's because you apparently misunderstood the actual reasoning at work here.  No biggie.


FWIW, the advantage is at least in part due to the fact that Harvard's OPIA is so strong -- and such a priority for the school.)

Not really.  The advantage is primarily because employers at the SEC and DOJ, just like the employers at top biglaw firms, know HLS is a better and more impressive school, and therefore prefer to hire from there.  It's pretty simple, really.


Also, it's obvious you have never looked for a public sector job if you don't believe networking is valuable (for both internships and post-grad jobs).

It's more obvious that you've never attended HLS (or know anyone who has) if you think an HLS student has to "network" with other students to obtain a public sector job.  This might be more of an issue at a school like GULC.



No, I am an immature female in my 30s.  But having been out of school for a long time and having deep roots in my community don't stop law school from occasionally being alienating.  I am very thankful for my friends, who make studying, applying for jobs, student organizing, and just being at school easier.  I imagine the same will be true for the OP.

Most mature males over 40 I know are either fairly independent emotionally, or have a wife / s.o. that fulfills their emotional needs.  They don't tend to need hand-holding in the grad school context, and they're not likely to sacrifice career prospects in order to acquire a theoretically more supportive academic environment.  (Men, of course, are different from women in many ways.) 

That said, the OP is welcome to clarify his own thoughts on the matter, and give us more guidance as we attempt to provide advice.  I just know, as a male who knows many other males, that this wouldn't generally be an area of concern for us.

But bottom line, it will be easier for him to obtain the desired jobs from HLS, and he should be aware of this as he balances it against other considerations, whatever they may be.  We're not helping him if we pretend otherwise.

86
I believe in reading the QStem first, so you know what to look for.  Others advise reading the Stimulus first.  Try both out.

There's a ton of threads on this issue, check out some older ones for more insight.

87
General Board / Re: Why is Cooley Law so despised?
« on: September 21, 2008, 11:28:17 PM »
Cooley is like Sarah Palin. No one would care about her pregnant daughter if she wasn't so obnoxious about abstinence-only education and "Christian" values. People wouldn't be so hard on Cooley if Cooley didn't misrepresent itself to students, didn't artificially deflate its mean GPA in order to take students' money and then kick them out, and didn't take advantage of those people who do go into law to help others.

There are plenty of T3/T4 schools that are respected within their communities and by prospective law students. People don't look down on Cooley because it is a T4 school, but because it actively seeks to present itself as something it is not.

1. You're an idiot.

2.  Most people like Sarah Palin.

3.  The only people who dislike her are moronic dems.

4.  Abstinence is the only birth control / STD prevention that actually works -- the problem with Palin's daughter is she wasn't practicing it.  That said, far more liberal dems get prenant every year than conservatives -- just look at the inner city.  They're almost all liberal democrats, and have the highest pregnancy and illegitimacy rates in the country.  Liberal dems also spread far more STD's, because they have no morals, and will sleep with anyone/anything.

5.  Christian values are the reason the U.S. and Western Europe have the best, most just societies on the planet.  Too bad dems don't really share those values. The real reason they're mad is b/c Palin's daughter didn't abort the baby, the way dems would prefer.

I hope this helps.

88
Looking for the Necessary Assumption.

P1.  Brain is chemical machine.
P2.  All chem reactions are temp dependent.
P3.  Any org that can control body temp can assure these reaction occur at proper temps.

C:  Thus, Mammals' ability to control body temps is factor in development of brains/intelligence.


Correct Answer D:  Development of IQ in mammals is dependent on chem reactions in brain taking place at proper temps. 

Here's why D is needed -- we know that the brain is a chemical machine, that all chem reactions are temperature dependent, and that controlling body temp assures the reaction will occur at proper temps. This seems to support the idea that controling body temps is important to developing the brain.

However, someone could still argue, theoretically, that intelligence is somehow not related to these chemical reactions occuring at the same temps.  (The conclusion relates to both the brain AND intelligence.)  So answer D fills in that hole.

If we negate Choice D, we see why it's an NA -- if the development of IQ is NOT dependent on chemical reactions occuring at the right temps, then the ability to control body temp becomes irrelevant, and the Conclusion fails.

Choice A is not really on point.  Even if true, it just means that cold-blooded animals can't generate internal heat, and must rely on external factors. It doesn't tell us anything about how this relates to IQ. 

Finally, if we negate it (cold blooded animals DO have the capacity to generate internal body heat), this doesn't really impact the Conclusion much.  For example, just because they can generate body heat doesn't mean they can properly regulate temps the way mammals can.  And even if they could, it doesn't mean that mammalian temp regulation isn't one necessary component in the development of mammalian IQ.

This is a tough one, and I'm a bit woozy, so I may be missing something, but I think this is basically what it comes down to.


89
They're not usually looking for a social scene, and they're unlikely to need others for emotional support in the same way a recent undergrad might.

I wish this were true.

I mostly agree with the rest of your analysis, but (a) having seen some of my own friends have trouble getting the jobs they want out of HLS and YLS, I think you are somewhat overestimating the placement advantages of the top schools for some groups of students and (b) I disagree with your notion that networking isn't important for SEC/Justice positions.  But YMMV.  I think it was helpful for Naturally to share information about the Harvard community even if it is unlikely to be a decisive factor in the OP's case.

Yeah, as noted, there's never anything wrong with extra info, I just think it's vital that the OP understands the placement differential b/t HLS and lower T14 schools.  I'd be surprised if any HLS grads had much difficulty with SEC/Justice jobs, given that most HLS grads are seeking the top biglaw jobs.  Either way, there's no question that it's harder from GULC, where many students are seeking such jobs.  I'm also not sure how networking with other students would help much in obtaining government jobs -- it would seem internships, etc., would be the key for this, along with the most impressive degree possible.

(Are you a mature male over 40?   ;)

90
Send me mail if you want

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