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Messages - Lindbergh

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71
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: high rankings vs special interests
« on: September 25, 2008, 01:12:58 AM »
By the way, going to a lower-ranked school tends to make it MORE difficult to end up ranked highly in your class, not less. The lower the school's ranking, the more important it becomes to do well, which means more competition.

You should check out other threads. There's a lot of information out there already that addresses questions very like yours.

I would agree that the intensity of competition may be somewhat greater, but on the other hand, the talent pool is also usually (somewhat) tougher at the higher-ranked schools, so it's hard to say it's actually easier to do better at a higher-ranked program.

Your broader point, however (that you can't rely on doing better at a lower-ranked school) is certainly valid.


72
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: high rankings vs special interests
« on: September 25, 2008, 01:08:29 AM »
so i just graduated from a lower-tier uc in june and am prepping for the lsats to apply for next fall.  with a gpa of 3.4 and an lsat score looking to be 165-175 (fingers crossed, but ill probably land somewhere around 170) im feeling just out of the running for a top 20 school and am now wondering, should i go for the highest ranked school i can get into or take a lower ranked school that feels like a better fit for me?  specifically i am looking heavily at lewis and clark- i love the area and the programs it offers seem awesome to me- indian law, public interest law and a top ranked environmental law program all seem major pluses, but a low national ranking makes me think twice.  id love to get into a top school like cornell or ut austin, and feel like if i send out enough apps i might break into a top 30 school.  basically, should i go for the ranking and take the rep of a big name school or take my chances at my safety school even if i get into those higher ranked programs?  and, a follow up question, assuming a good lsat score, lets say 3.4/175, what would be my odds at the top schools in the country?

If you can break 170, you have a shot at a T14.  Make sure you apply to all (outside of HYS Boalt), and consider applying to one Early Decision to maximize your odds.

The general rule is that if you can get into a T14, you should go, as the placement oppportunities are so much better.  There's no guarantee you'll do well in your class at a lower-ranked school, because the students will still be competitive. 

The exception to this rule is if 1) you're looking to stay in a specific region, and the lower-ranked school is strong in that region, 2) you get significant scholarship money (preferably full-ride) from that school, and 3) it feels like a significantly better fit. 

In your case, if you're cool staying around L&C, and you get big scholarship money (which you probably will if you break 170), and you visit and really like it, then it probably makes sense to go.  Just make sure you apply to higher-ranked schools as well, so you can leverage those acceptances into more financial aid from L&C.

73
Studying for the LSAT / Re: How to deal with... parents.
« on: September 23, 2008, 01:02:59 AM »

For all practical purposes, a 171 is a nerve-wracking score.


How exactly?  It's good enough for any school, provided you have the other necessary requirements.  It's clearly good enough for a T14, if your grades are decent.  And even if your grades completely suck, it will get you a full-ride at other schools.

You know what's a really nerve-wracking score?  A 128.  Because you can't get into law school with that.

74
Studying for the LSAT / Re: How to deal with... parents.
« on: September 23, 2008, 12:58:46 AM »
Challenge them to try a full preptest. Works with all of my friends.

Then you can watch their sad faces drop into the abyss when they pull that low 130..

Excellent advice.

Also like the percentiles idea.

75
Studying for the LSAT / Re: How to deal with... parents.
« on: September 23, 2008, 12:57:34 AM »
Umm, so yea, parents. Who drop random stupid hints about how a 171 is a bad score. And other negativity circa crazy unhelpful stressful comments when I'm taking a break and they think I'm not working hard enough.

Yes, I've told them clearly they're not helping. Yes, I've expressed every emotion from anger to reason trying to tell them that such snide insults just put unnecessary pressure on me and don't help the score. And yes, I know I shouldn't let it get to me, but I am really proud of myself for going from a 153 to where I am, but because no one in my entire family is a lawyer, no one gets how hard that is. So all they see is the 180 and think it's pie to get there and that I must not be working hard enough if I'm "just" at a 171.

I hate this. What to do? Any advice, thoughtful please. Thanks.

Tell them Bill Clinton and Barack Obama only scored around 90th percentile, 163 level.  Might shut them up, at least if they're Dems.

76
Studying for the LSAT / Re: How to deal with... parents.
« on: September 23, 2008, 12:55:59 AM »

Test day isn't at your place.  Study somewhere else, even if it's not comfy.  Especially if it's not comfy.

That is all.

Your pits still stink.  Please wash them, or change your avatar.  Tyia.


77
Seriously, dude, the LSAT isn't worth this much stress.

78
LSAT horror stories / Re: Ridiculous buttplugs questions
« on: September 22, 2008, 11:51:53 PM »
Any of you guys O&A fans? I'm seeing a few references in this thread

What's that?

79
Studying for the LSAT / Re: How to go from a 147 to a 169
« on: September 22, 2008, 03:20:19 AM »
Man, I wish I could devote eight hours a day to studying. It would sure beat devoting those eight hours to an actual job (no joke.)

I've performed well on my practice tests so far (taking it on October 4th - have been studying consistently since may and on and off prior to that), but I certainly hope I'm not at a terrible disadvantage because I couldn't devote every waking hour to preparation.

This isn't a criticism of your advice. I'm simply wondering if anyone else was in a similar position and still managed to perform well (let's say, 165+)?

You don't need to prep 8 hours a day, and you don't need to prep every day.  3 days a week is fine for most months leading up to the test.

That said, you should generally step it up in the month before the exam, prep most days, and be willing to put in some long hours during that period.  Then wind it down the last few days before the actual test.

80
LSAT horror stories / Re: Ridiculous buttplugs questions
« on: September 22, 2008, 12:45:35 AM »
*sigh* old people.

Now you're fantasizing about old people in the buttplugs thread? 

Sounds like you need to hit www.lemonparty.com.

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