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Messages - Lindbergh

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61
Studying for the LSAT / Re: New- Any advice?
« on: September 27, 2008, 10:09:52 AM »
People have written some pretty solid advice, most of which I would follow. In the end, though, it is you who must decide when you are ready to take the test. From what I've read so far, I'd say wait until December 2008 or maybe even February 2009.

This varies with everyone, but it seems that most people need several months to internalize the techniques tested by the LSAT. It's not a test where one "crams," and then forgets everything he/she studied. It's a test that compels one to think in specific ways, so naturally it comes more intuitively to some than others. 6 months ago I took a PrepTest with no prior knowledge, scored about 138 and missed almost all of the AR (logic games) questions. I almost gave up on the spot. I've worked hard since then, and I started feeling ready to take the real LSAT a couple weeks ago (I'm scheduled for October 4). I've been averaging 165, with a most recent PrepTest score of 170. Now I'm maximizing speed and getting into "the Zone." People will have wildly different study patterns, but nearly everyone will need to spend 3-12 months preparing.

Once you start applying LSAT principles to almost every real-life situation (such as asking yourself "Under which of the following assumptions am I operating by posting a response to this Law School Discussion thread: A..." or "Which of the following, if true, would increase my chances of having a subjectively successful encounter with an unquestionably desirable partner at the upcoming annual Christmas Party, at which there exists a 75% probability of meeting such a subject: A..."), you're well on your way.

As you get more comfortable, take timed full-length Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests in increasingly distracting areas. It's one thing to take a PrepTest at your kitchen table, it's quite another to take one at the local transit center. Taking PrepTests in noisy environments should help build your ability to focus through any annoying distractions that come up during the real LSAT, as well as develop skills that will help you exceed our own expectations regarding your legal career.

Tear it up!




Very solid, and inspiring, post.  I know other people who have gone from the 130's (or 120's) to the 160's -- it's definitely attainable, and you're correct that it's a matter of individual development, and being willing to devote the requisite time, whatever that may be.

62
Studying for the LSAT / Re: New- Any advice?
« on: September 27, 2008, 03:48:48 AM »
1.  Postpone till December.

2.  Start doing untimed practice exams, with plenty of breaks.  Just do them section by section, and break within sections if needed. Apply all your bible techniques.  Keep track of your scores.  Hit both older and newer exams using this approach.

3.  After doing 5 or 6 untimed exams (and hopefully hitting your target score or better -- shoot for at least 170) start doing sections without breaks, and pushing yourself to work as fast as you comfortably can, but with your primary focus on understanding and accuracy.  Keep track of how long sections take you, but don't try to meet any specific time limit.

4.  After 5 or so like this, use your average section length as your baseline, and start timing your sections on that basis.  After each exam, reduce your section time by 5 minutes, until you eventually reach 35 minutes.  (You can postpone reductions for an exam or two when feel the need for a greater adjustment period, but the key is steady, small, gradual reductions in time -- don't ever reduce by more than 5 minutes on any one exam.)  Also, start reducing your break time between sections, first working towards 2-section blocks, then 4-section exams, and eventually 5 section exams.

This approach will allow you to improve speed and endurance while retaining accuracy and understanding.  Make sure you hit both older and newer exams at each stage of your timing adjustments.

63
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Possibly teaching a prep course?
« on: September 27, 2008, 03:32:13 AM »
Is anyone else thinking of teaching a prep course after they take in October? Maybe this is some strange version of Stockholm Syndrome, but I've really come to enjoy the nature of this test when there's no pressure to perform well. I love explaining concepts on the test, and I'd probably be a million times better at teaching a course than the instructor I had.

Has anyone else looked into teaching for TM, for example? It says that their minimum score is a 170, but that obviously is by no means sufficient to be hired. What other things do they look for/how high above 170 do you have to score to virtually guarantee that, barring someone being a complete neanderthal with no social skills, you'll be hired?

Plenty of instructors fit this description.

Honestly, though, if you can get the requisite score, and have any kind of half-decent communication skills, you should be fine.

64
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Need Advice on tackling Assumption questions.
« on: September 27, 2008, 03:23:59 AM »
As noted, a sufficient assumption is something that will be enough to justify the conclusion when added to (any) existing premises.

However, keep in mind that a sufficient assumption MIGHT ALSO be a necessary assumption.  So don't exclude an answer choice simply because it plays both roles. 

On the other hand, the fact that something is ONLY a necessary assumption clearly precludes it from being the right answer for a SA question.

biconditionals are rare occurrences imo.

You're probably right, but I think it's questionable to apply a strategy of excluding answer choices simply because they play both roles, so I just wanted to point that out.

A quick example of such a biconditional:

Premise 1:  The movie costs $10.00. 

Conclusion: I can afford to go to the movie.

Answer Choice:  The author has $10.

Here, the answer choice is a necessary assumption, but it's also a sufficient assumption.

On the other hand, you should be aware that often the exam will throw you a curveball by listing both sufficient and necessary assumptions as answer choices, in an effort to mislead you, and this is probably what the other poster was getting at.  Usually, if they're asking for one type of assumption, you can quickly exclude the other type as red herrings.

But for purposes of conceptual understanding, it's good to understand that these assumptions are not necessarily mutually exclusive.  Some facts may qualify as both necessary and sufficent conditions, and some assumptions may qualify as both necessary and sufficient assumptions.  However, they'll usually just be one or the other, and you certainly can't assume it's both just because it's one.  Many things are necessary without being sufficient, and many things are sufficient without being necessary. 

To be necessary and sufficient, it should be

Answer Choice:  The author has at least $10.


In the sense that it shouldn't be "the author has ONLY $10", yes.  Because it's clearly not necessary for the author to have only $10.  It's only necessary that the author meets the requisite requirement of having $10.

The conventional usage of "the author has $10" would also normally cover situations where the author has more than $10.  If someone asked you if you had $10, and you had $100, you'd generally say yes.  That's what I meant by the statement - I was just trying to keep it simple.

However, to the extent anyone was actually confused by this, kudos.

65
The link provides index #'s, but no actual formulas. (Though I suppose you could deduce the formula from the info provided.)

That said, it would appear from this chart that LSAT is worth at least twice as much as GPA for most schools.

Most schools almost certainly give LSAT+GPA most of the weight in any admission decision.  I would guess that for most schools, LSAT is worth at least 50% of the total admission decision, and probably more, while GPA is worth around 25%, and the rest coming down to essays and soft factors.

66
LSAT horror stories / Re: Ridiculous buttplugs questions
« on: September 25, 2008, 01:52:46 AM »
Opie and Anthony Show? Morning radio show

Oh, okay, I've heard of them, but never heard them.  I know Stern rags on them as imitators sometimes, but he hates all competition.

Yeah, they rag on Stern a lot, too. I wonder whats going to happen once Sirius and XM merge between those two shows? I'm going through withdrawal since my XM is in my truck and that's SOL right now

I'm sure they'll keep them both.  There's probably a relative lack of marketable content on satellite right now, and Stern probably cares about money more than he hates O&A, even if he is a major owner in Sirius.

67
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Terrified of the LSAT
« on: September 25, 2008, 01:51:32 AM »
Thank you for saying that its good I am thinking ahead.  I get really tired of people telling me to focus on my undergrad and that I may change my mind, etc.  I hate to admit this, but the entire reason for going ahead with my bachelors is specifically so that I can get into law school.  Sure, there is a pretty large possibility that I may not get in, etc. and then atleast I will have a bachelors to compliment my paralegal certificate, but I am pretty goal oriented and hell bent on law school.

I guess I just want to know, is it possible to go to a state law school with an lsat score around 150?  That is pretty average, right?


150 is very average.  (The statistical median is right around 151/152.) 

That said, most law schools require higher scores, including most public schools.  You should generally shoot for at least a 155 to be reasonably competitive.

On the other hand, there are some schools where you can get in with an LSAT below 150.  They're obviously not the best, but they're still out there.

One thing to think about -- if you have a strong relationship with your current firm (and it seems that you do), then you may be able to get a job there even if you just attend a modest local law school.  It depends on the firm, but if it's not a real snooty place, and they know you and like you, and know you're a good worker, they might be able to take you on once you get your JD, regardless of where it's from.  Studying PT and continuing to work may be good for this, as it will maintain the relationship and make the segue from paralegal to attorney fairly seamless.

In other words, you're relatively well-positioned.  You have grades and contacts, which are a huge part of the picture.  Just work steadily on the LSAT -- it's very learnable -- starting out completely untimed, and just focusing on the concepts.  Start with a basic Kaplan book, and then carefully work through the powerscore books, or take a quality course.  Give yourself a good amount of lead time, ease into the process, and you'll feel much more comfortable with the test fairly soon.

68
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Need Advice on tackling Assumption questions.
« on: September 25, 2008, 01:37:18 AM »
One thing I do to determine if an answer is sufficient is ask for every single answer -- could this lead to the conclusion without being required for the conclusion to happen?

Would you mind giving me an example of this?


Again, I think this is a questionable approach, because the Sufficient answer might ALSO be something required for the conclusion to happen.

However, to go back to my hypo --

If the Stimulus involves a premise that the movies cost $10, and the Conclusion is that ChiGirl can afford to go, and you have an answer choice "A" that says ChiGirl has $20, then we know Choice A is a Sufficent Assumption, because it would clearly be enough to justify the Conclusion. 

On the other hand, it's clearly not required, as you could still go to the movies even if you didn't have $20.  So we know it's not a Necessary Assumption.

69
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Need Advice on tackling Assumption questions.
« on: September 25, 2008, 01:26:44 AM »
As noted, a sufficient assumption is something that will be enough to justify the conclusion when added to (any) existing premises.

However, keep in mind that a sufficient assumption MIGHT ALSO be a necessary assumption.  So don't exclude an answer choice simply because it plays both roles. 

On the other hand, the fact that something is ONLY a necessary assumption clearly precludes it from being the right answer for a SA question.

biconditionals are rare occurrences imo.

You're probably right, but I think it's questionable to apply a strategy of excluding answer choices simply because they play both roles, so I just wanted to point that out.

A quick example of such a biconditional:

Premise 1:  The movie costs $10.00. 

Conclusion: I can afford to go to the movie.

Answer Choice:  The author has $10.

Here, the answer choice is a necessary assumption, but it's also a sufficient assumption.

On the other hand, you should be aware that often the exam will throw you a curveball by listing both sufficient and necessary assumptions as answer choices, in an effort to mislead you, and this is probably what the other poster was getting at.  Usually, if they're asking for one type of assumption, you can quickly exclude the other type as red herrings.

But for purposes of conceptual understanding, it's good to understand that these assumptions are not necessarily mutually exclusive.  Some facts may qualify as both necessary and sufficent conditions, and some assumptions may qualify as both necessary and sufficient assumptions.  However, they'll usually just be one or the other, and you certainly can't assume it's both just because it's one.  Many things are necessary without being sufficient, and many things are sufficient without being necessary. 

dude you are such a Pro at LSAT that I fear you might look like this guy.




im jk but really thanks for all your help.



This is probably more like it:



*lol*

Maybe he's absorbing Angelina's anorexia fat.

70
LSAT horror stories / Re: Ridiculous buttplugs questions
« on: September 25, 2008, 01:23:09 AM »
Opie and Anthony Show? Morning radio show

Oh, okay, I've heard of them, but never heard them.  I know Stern rags on them as imitators sometimes, but he hates all competition.

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