Law School Discussion

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Messages - cerealkiller

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41
Sollicitus, your posts are truly reflective of your username. You are quit disturbed, my man. Good luck with that.

42
Blue54, save yourself the effort. In all seriousness, I think this guy might be borderline retarded. This cretin just hops from thread to thread insulting and antagonizing anyone who makes the mistake of acknowledging his lowly existence.



43
Obviously your reading comprehension and reasoning skills are severely lacking. I advise that you purchase a very robust legal malpractice insurance policy because you're going to need it, my imbecilic friend.

Yes, the end result of being proven wrong. Does responding make you feel better dumbass? You compared black letter cold hard fact definitions of a GOVT EXAM to "opinions in the law"......... are you trying to be a flame, or just that good at it. God  I hope it is on purpose, for the good of mankind.

Well, unlike you, I'm prepared to prove my point with facts rather than rely on hyperbole and fanciful analogies. Your reading comprehension and reasoning skills are lacking. Case in point, you inferred that I was an officer. I was not an officer and nothing in my comment suggested that I was. But that didn't stop you from drawing that erroneous conclusion.

I was enlisted, not commissioned. A 91B, in fact. I went to Fort Leonardwood for basic training, Fort Sam Houston for AIT, and I served in Kansas, Korea, and Hawaii. You're a joke, Sollicitus.


44
Obviously your reading comprehension and reasoning skills are severely lacking. I advise that you purchase a very robust legal malpractice insurance policy because you're going to need it, my imbecilic friend. 

45
Very classy, Sollicitus! I would have expected nothing less from you.

You do realize that you're entering a field where others are going to have competing viewpoints that differ from you own, right? It seems like the least you could do is present your viewpoint without resorting to ad hominem attacks, but I guess that's out of the question.

Good luck with your legal career!

46
There's no need to take the ASVAB. That's simply an aptitude test to determine what job will fit you best.

Common mistake by civies about what  "aptitude" means.

You can [u]NOT[/u] take [u]ANY[/u] job in the military without taking the ASVAB first. They won't let  you. There is a minimum score to even get in at all, and line scores for each job requirment. It's not like the stoner high school counsler asking you to take a test that asks "what do you like" think of it like the GED and LSAT and GMAT all at once. The word "Aptitude" only confuses those who have no friggin' idea what they are talking about.

Don't trust me, look it up or ask your recruiting officer.

I served in the U.S. Army. So I'm not someone who lacks a basic understanding of how the process works. If a person has been admitted to practice law in any U.S. jurisdiction, why would that person need to take an ASVAB?

Apparently you're the one who is confused about the meaning of 'aptitude.' An aptitude test doesn't test knowledge but rather it tests ability. The ASVAB is much like the LSAT in that regard. What in the world could an ASVAB test determine about a possible JAG candidate that hasn't already been fully demonstrated by the candidate having already taken the LSAT, graduated from law school, and then passed the bar exam in at least one U.S. jurisdiction?

Officers do not take the ASVAB, period. The ASVAB is used to determine the vocational aptitude of enlisted personnel only.

47
All I can say is making a decision based solely (or even mostly) on the figures provided by U.S. News and World Report is a bad idea.

48
There's no need to take the ASVAB. That's simply an aptitude test to determine what job will fit you best.

49
Your physical fitness is exceptional. That's fantastic. But one's fitness level is only a small part of the selection process. You'll need to excel in class as well. With the contraction and realignment of private practice, public sector jobs have become highly competitive. Thus, you'll need to do very well in class in order to be selected.

The various service branches typically send out representatives to law schools to speak with interested students about their respective JAG programs. One of these information sessions would probably answer a lot of your questions. If you want to be more proactive, however, I would recommend calling a Coast Guard or Air Force recruiting office. I'm sure they would be happy to provide information regarding the steps involved in the process. Also, if you haven't already done so, you could probably find a lot of information on the Coast Guard and Air Force websites.

50
My only addition to the above comment is that you should choose a college major you truly enjoy. Law schools don't prefer certain majors over others. But they do assume that you committed yourself completely to your undergraduate studies and want to see that you performed well academically given that assumption. If you enjoy a particular subject, you're more likely to study harder and receive higher grades as a result.

Also, when you finally get around to applying to law school you'll be permitted to write an addendum to your application explaining your first semester grades. Assuming you end up with a significantly higher gpa, this should be persuasive. But I would avoid saying you were "home sick." I'm not telling you to lie, but you should spin it in a more favorable light. For example, if you're the first person in your family to have attended college, you could use this as the basis for explaining your first semester troubles.

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