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Messages - cerealkiller

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21
Transferring / Re: Process of Transferring From COOLEY
« on: May 09, 2012, 02:17:47 PM »
FutureLSStudent, if you're goal is to finish your law degree at a school other than Cooley then you'd probably be better off foregoing school in the fall and retake the LSAT in an attempt to score into the school of your choice.

As Roald pointed out, finishing in the top 10% is unlikely. In fact, you have a 90% chance of not finishing in the top 10%. The odds are stacked precariously against you. And in many ways, how well you do your first year is largely out of your control. The forced curve is brutal. Professors try to grade objectively (one can hope), but complete objectivity is impossible given the subjective nature of legal analysis. It's not as though every question has a clear right or wrong answer; there are many shades of gray in the law. A professor, for example, might mark you down because you chose to flesh out an argument that he thought was of little importance, even though reasonable minds could disagree as to its legal relevance.   

If you move forward with your current plan, you're placing your fate mostly in the hands of your professors and fellow students. Law school is fiercely competitive. It's unlike college in almost every imaginable way. You could conceivably spend 18 hours a day in the library and still end up with a pedestrian gpa that's well outside of the top 10%.

In my humble opinion, you'd be better off devoting the time and energy that you ostensibly plan to exert in your studies this fall to retaking (and mastering) the LSAT.

22
Transferring / Re: Process of Transferring From COOLEY
« on: May 09, 2012, 11:44:01 AM »
Of course the LSAT isn't perfect, no test is. However, as you point out, the LSAT is a dependable predictor of academic aptitude (the exact thing it is designed to predict!). It stands to reason that in most cases a student with a high LSAT score will out perform those with lower scores. The LSAT is not supposed to approximate the law school experience, it just measures ability.

You're right. But what I took issue with was Nova Juris saying, "if you go, plan to graduate and plan to go part time since if your LSAT is under 160 you can't handle a 15 credit load and not be academicly [sic] dismissed." That statement is just plain ludicrous.

23
Transferring / Re: Process of Transferring From COOLEY
« on: May 08, 2012, 11:41:35 PM »
If you havn't started yet and plan to transfer don't go. Just raise your LSAT and (if possible) try to take a few extra classes that are blow off to raise your undergrad GPA. (If going to cooley I am guessing you don't have your full BA)

There are going to be people there who have a 160 LSAT and 4.0 undergad GPA who are attending just for the full ride. They will be the top 10% of your class. They won't want to transfer but will be the only ones other school truely want. The curve will make that happen.

If you can't stand Cooley don't go. If you go, plan to graduate and plan to go part time since if your LSAT is under 160 you can't handle a 15 credit load and not be academicly dismissed. You just can't. Expect 5 years at Cooley if you go.

You act as if there's a perfect correlation between one's LSAT score and law school success. While it's true that the LSAT is a very dependable indicator of one's academic ability, it is far from perfect. For instance, when in law school have you ever been asked to perform the same task that is asked of test takers on LSAT logic games? Never, I suspect.

The LSAT is a gatekeeper, which is purposely designed to generate a bell-curved distribution of scores.

24
"Goods" means all things that are movable at the time of identification to a contract for sale. The raw materials required to build this thing are movable, right? This contract involves goods and services, which upon completion of the project will result in a non-movable structure. 

You'll get more points if you identify issues rather than just skipping pass them and concluding this is a service contract. In the end, it likely is a service contract. But, again, you don't want to be too conclusory in your response. Issue spotting is not just about spotting solvable issues, but also spotting those that aren't so easily answered.

With that said, I don't think you'd want to be belabor the UCC argument. This problem is best answered by applying common law principles.

25
This is a mixed contract, so you'll want to determine if it's predominantly for goods or services. Unless there are more facts that have been excluded, it's impossible to determine from the fact that the contract was for $2M. Therefore, you'll likely want to analyze the problem using both the UCC and CL.

26
Forget everything you have read or heard about going to a ranked school.  Just because you go to a less than "stellar" school according to a flawed ranking system does not mean that you will be less than when viewed by firms or that you will not have a job opportunity, for that matter.  You have heard that outside of top 15 you are just wasting money.  You have believed that no one will hire you because of your choice of school.  You have been subjected to slights and ridicule (from this discussion board no doubt) as to the fact that you are attending a t3 or t4.  What matters most is understanding what region your school is in.  What is important in this is that you will understand what type of law and practice is relevant there.  While most of the students want to practice generic corporate law, criminal law, etc. consider what is going on in the area.  For instance, in the southwest (Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Colorado) the main industry that pays is oil and gas.  Each region may have their own unique niche.  My law school has oil and gas companies that recruit regularly from our graduates.  For the most part, these corporations mostly are alumni.  And by the way, these jobs pay six figures.  I am a 3L that is literally in the bottom half of my class at a t4 school and have a job lined up making 96k starting out.  I have nothing to gain by getting on this computer and making things up.  I just know how it was when I started law school.. People on this board told me that I was a fool for going to law school at a t4.  I have this to say to them...it does not MATTER!!!  When you get to your t3 or t4 school start networking.  Networking starts in the classroom.  There are people in your class room that are from that area that either know people or they are the person (you need to know!).  Find out what is unique in that area besides the run-of-the-mill estate planning, civil litigation, etc.  I think you get the point.  Just do not get discouraged and do not listen to 0L's who know not what they speak about.  I am open to questions if you have any.

That's wonderful! You should be very proud of your accomplishment. However, your accomplishment is the exception that proves the rule. If this sort of entry-level success was routine for graduates of T4 schools, my guess is you wouldn't have taken the time to post about it.

27
Distance Education Law Schools / Re: Taft or Concord Law School
« on: April 24, 2012, 02:39:51 PM »
If you are easily offended by people looking down on an online degree, avoid any place with ABA grads.
If I choose to attend a nontraditional law school, knowing full well of the imposed limitations now in place by some sort of self-appointed political body that was irrelevant less than 100 years ago, and can make my way in it, who’s place is it to judge what or how I do it? 

The ABA doesn't impose any limitations on you. It's the state legislatures, and, more importantly, employers who impose the limitations. ABA-accreditation gives employers confidence that a prospective employee has received a legal education that meets a minimum standard of thoroughness and quality. Should your imagined right to work as an attorney somehow trump an employer's right to hire whom he sees fit?

Like it or not, ABA-accreditation combined with the U.S. News and World Report rankings provide employers immediate feedback as to the marketplace's perceived quality of the prospective employee's legal education. From there, the employer can then drill down even further and examine grades, extracurricular activities, and so on to arrive at a decision to hire him or not. Was so wrong with that?

There's nothing particularly draconian about the system. Every prospective law student knows or has reason to know the rules of the game. If you choose to sidestep the minimum requirements to play the game and end up watching it from the sidelines, don't cast blame on the ABA.

28
Distance Education Law Schools / Re: Taft or Concord Law School
« on: April 24, 2012, 12:19:43 AM »

Too bad "the people" don't nominate SCOTUS Justices, Presidents do. With or without the ABA, the SCOTUS nominations would look much the same as today with nominees coming primarily out of the best law schools in the country.

Ever read the "Power Elite" by C Wright Mills?  That is why we have SCOTUS judges who are essentially corporate and government schills.

And that would somehow magically change if only the elitists would allow non-ABA grads to crash the party? I think not.

29
Studying and Exam Taking / Re: Contracts...kill me now
« on: April 23, 2012, 11:57:59 PM »
Above all else remember this........ thank Heaven for the curve.   ;)

The curve isn't so kind if one finds himself at the bottom of the heap.

30
Distance Education Law Schools / Re: Taft or Concord Law School
« on: April 23, 2012, 10:59:24 PM »
Why "concede?"  That's what I'm calling "... lame, subjective, and unsupported ..."  It only encourages narrow minded people to believe they have some sort of plausible argument.  The other guy's argument shouldn't even be considered as having any sort of merit.

Like it or not, he makes a very plausible argument.  I agree with you insofar as the correct definition of "success" is arguable. But it's just silly to ignore the fact that a graduate of an online law school is going to be hampered, rightfully so or not, with more than a few career hurdles. A few of which will never be successfully navigated, no matter how brilliant the individual may be. For instance, no one from an online law school will ever sit on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Why not? A law degree is not even constitutionally required to sit on SCOTUS.  People may get fed up with the ABA as the self appointed guardian of who is qualified.

Too bad "the people" don't nominate SCOTUS Justices, Presidents do. With or without the ABA, the SCOTUS nominations would look much the same as today with nominees coming primarily out of the best law schools in the country.




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