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Messages - Groundhog

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31
I don't think it will raise a red flag so much as not be looked at vs. someone who has a high LSAT. The fact is that both a reasonably high GPA and LSAT are necessary, but not sufficient conditions to gain admission to top law schools. Certainly someone with a 4.0 from a top school will be more competitive than someone with a 4.0 from an online school if they have the same LSAT, but this would probably only matter in a borderline situation as long as the online school is accredited by the appropriate regional institution.

In any event, if this Liberty online is affiliated with the brick and mortar institution, there is a possibility there will be enough people who applied to law school from Liberty that their grading trends and LSAT scores will be reported in the CAS report. That will tell you the institution's average LSAT and approximately what percentile an applicant's GPA is.

32
It's probably fine if the LORs are from recent professors from your 2nd BA.

I don't think there's any real difference in your law school application when it comes to finishing your 2nd bachelors, but here is my opinion in general: You don't know where life will take you and what possibilities an additional degree will offer you. I can't say the same for an almost completed degree. In the end, I think it's worthwhile to finish things you start, but it depends on your financial situation, among other things.

33
Politely ask the LOR writer to make note of how he/she knows you, and ask that while doing so, they mention that although you have the same last name, you are not related.

34
As there's little penalty for re-taking the LSAT, he definitely should, and give it 3-6 months of serious study time.

35
General board for soon-to-be 1Ls / Re: Best Summer Options
« on: December 31, 2012, 07:59:51 PM »
I wouldn't advise just taking it off even if you do have a job lined up after graduation. If you want to relax a bit, try to split your summers between an internship(if you can get one that short) and a class or something.

36
Probably wouldn't hurt to restrict the number of licensed attorneys in some way—either through lowering bar passage rates, eliminating unaccredited schools, or figuring out some way to decrease class size(likely the toughest).

Of course, I say this after being admitted.

37
General Off-Topic Board / Season's Greetings from LSD
« on: December 25, 2012, 08:33:29 PM »
Happy holidays and merry Christmas! Whichever holidays you celebrate, we here at LSD wish you the best, whether you're a lurker, long-time poster, or applying to law school for the first time.

38
General Board / Re: lobbists
« on: December 24, 2012, 10:18:26 PM »
Not sure what you mean by state board for being licensed to practice law, since D.C. isn't a state but lawyers from states can be admitted to the bar there, often without examination.

As the above poster said, you do not need to be a lawyer to be a legislator(or aide) or lobbyist, it's just very common because the law is a very systematic way to understand government.

39
I struggled with Community Property (at an ABA school) and it was my lowest grade. It is true that some specifics of statutes may not be tested, but there are many small concepts in community property (and the related wills subject) that can be tested and you need to know them all for the bar examination. For example, Question 2 of the July 2012 California Bar Exam was a somewhat difficult Community Property/Professional Responsibility crossover that tested a small but important area of CP. http://admissions.calbar.ca.gov/Portals/4/documents/gbx/JULY_2012_CBX_Questions_PTs_R.pdf is the link.

District courts may not have a bar exam, but state bar exams test Federal law through constitutional law and evidence at a minimum.

40
General Board / Re: Additional Easy Bar Admissions
« on: December 20, 2012, 08:52:51 PM »
So essentially, almost anyone admitted to practice in a state or appropriate jurisdiction can waive into D.C. without an exam, eh? Thank you for this.

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