Law School Discussion

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Messages - Groundhog

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Personal Statement / Re: Need advice on Personal Statement Conclusion
« on: December 03, 2014, 08:44:45 PM »
It's not just about getting into Harvard. The personal statement matters just as much for anyone applying to schools where they aren't a lock based on numbers, regardless of whether it's the lowest-ranked ABA school or a Tier 1 or Harvard. Unless one is only applying to safety schools, writing a good personal statement is important.

12
Personal Statement / Re: Need advice on Personal Statement Conclusion
« on: December 03, 2014, 07:22:04 PM »
One mustn't have done something incredible to write a great personal statement. The best personal statements I've read were sincere and self-aware, gave me an idea about the applicant. None of the most outstanding personal statements I've read were about any particularly noteworthy achievements, but the writing set them apart. Years later, I remember one about playing the cello. The applicant wasn't particularly skilled in the cello, a competent college player at best, and made no effort to appear otherwise, but she described what it meant to her in a way that gave me understanding of who she was.

I feel like this discussion is partially missing the point. By the time one is writing a personal statement, one should already have an LSAT and GPA. Yes, those are the most important factors, and will account for 90% of your admissions chances. But that remaining margin is likely to matter at reach or target schools, where applicants are in a pile getting more scrutiny and either neither presumptively denied nor admitted(competitive) or slight presumptive deny.

In sum, the personal statement is important because it's the biggest factor outside of LSAT and GPA, which should already be determined by the time an applicant writes a personal statement. This matters the most for schools an applicant is most concerned about, the target and reach schools. It absolutely makes the difference at the best law schools where an applicant is likely to be admitted.

13
Personal Statement / Re: Need advice on Personal Statement Conclusion
« on: December 02, 2014, 09:35:50 PM »
Have to disagree. Personal statement can be much more helpful or harmful to an applicant than references. While no one is immune from their numbers, an amazing story or a poorly-written personal statement has a much more meaningful impact on the admissions committee than the usually dry letters. This matters the most when the applicant is competitive, but not a presumptive admit by the numbers, presumably the kinds of schools about which an applicant would care.

14
Personal Statement / Re: Need advice on Personal Statement Conclusion
« on: December 02, 2014, 08:31:20 PM »
You could say something along the lines of I look forward to learning how to assist immigrants with achieving their dreams at  (INSERT LAW SCHOOL). Law School is well known for their outstanding legal education curriculum and I know that if I am admitted there (INSERT LAW SCHOOL) will be proud to call me an alumni.
This is blatantly transparent. Admissions rolls their eyes at these.

15
Distance Education Law Schools / Re: LLB (Graduate Entry)
« on: November 28, 2014, 11:23:47 PM »
California should bar foreign lawyers whose jurisdictions who do not offer California lawyers the chance to sit for the bar.

California doesn't have enough attorneys?!

17
Also note that less than 83 law units may be required in the case of dual/joint degrees. A JD/MBA or similar degree would be 50-60 credits in law. Essentially you'd do 2 years in law school and 2 years in business/grad school.

18
ABA Standard 304:
(b) A law school shall require, as a condition for graduation, successful completion of a course of study in residence of not fewer than 58,000 minutes of instruction time, except as otherwise provided. At least 45,000 of these minutes shall be by attendance in regularly scheduled class sessions at the law school.

Interpretation 304-4
Law schools may find the following examples useful. Law schools on a conventional semester system typically require 700 minutes of instruction time per “credit,” exclusive of time for an examination. A quarter hour of credit requires 450 minutes of instruction time, exclusive of time for an examination. To achieve the required total of 58,000 minutes of instruction time, a law school must require at least 83 semester hours of credit, or 129 quarter hours of credit.

19
General Off-Topic Board / Re: You can now be served by facebook!
« on: November 19, 2014, 09:01:34 PM »
I'm far from an expert on California civil procedure, but where do you see the good enough summons for persons generally? I don't see it in the statute. Is it in the caselaw?

20
General Off-Topic Board / Re: You can now be served by facebook!
« on: November 18, 2014, 06:25:09 PM »
To be fair, this probably should've been titled "via" Facebook. Facebook served many people prior to this... :P

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