Law School Discussion

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Messages - racheles05

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General Board / Re: How do we figure out which firms are evil?
« on: July 14, 2006, 09:55:08 PM »
It varies by office and location. The only thing you can do is look around in Vault and Infirmation, talk to alumni and find out about billable hours requirements. You can also ask your professors.

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General Board / Re: Rankings, how to round
« on: July 14, 2006, 08:58:07 PM »
I think at my school they don't round at all. I know they round down for GPA, which sucks because I'm .01 point away from the next highest number, but that's life. If there's any question, you could just be X out of XXX students instead of a percentage ranking.

33
It depends on the person. There will probably be problems with the communication of the information, but that happens with any new teacher. If the person has taught or trained somewhere else, it could go really smoothly. There's no sense in reading anything into it; it all boils down the exam anyway. Ask a lot of questions about the exam and don't worry about classtime. Also, don't call the prof out for being inexperienced. That never goes well.

34
General Board / Re: How do we figure out which firms are evil?
« on: July 14, 2006, 08:49:35 PM »
The first thing to look at is the ratio of humans to flesh-eating zombies. If the firm hires just a couple of flesh-eating zombies, it might not be evil, but that's something to consider when you're dropping your resume for OCI. Also, how many associates lose limbs after their first year? How do they lose those limbs? Does a portion of your signing bonus go to Satan? None of these things are dispositive, but they're important factors you should consider if you think a firm might be evil.

Also, don't drop for Holland & Knight.

35
Transferring / Re: Stay here or go to Columbia?
« on: July 09, 2006, 11:47:17 PM »
I'm applying to Columbia. I asked a professor about my decision, he talked with me for a while and ultimately said I should go. I have personal reasons that make my situation more complicated, and he said in no uncertain terms that if it wasn't for the personal stuff it wouldn't even be a difficult decision. He also said that I'll do fine if I don't transfer, I'm at a T2 school, but he said that basically when you have a Columbia degree you can walk into almost any firm and get hired on the spot. The really elite firms will only hire law review members, but I wouldn't have a shot at any of those places now anyway.

In regards to the school sucking thing, it does matter from what I've heard. Don't brush it off. Lawyers are jerks with small wangs who see everything as a pissing contest - especially what school you attend. Also remember that partners want to impress their clients, and if that means giving their clients more face time with the Harvard or Columbia grad than the really smart Brooklyn grad who does all the work, that's what will happen.

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General Board / Re: Is law review really worth it?
« on: June 20, 2006, 11:09:40 PM »
That's true, but read the SCOTUS briefs. Now those are very well-written. I don't think it matters how the Justices write; it's the people who convince the Justices to find for them who really know how to write. You taking Con Law II with Gey? I was in his Con Law I class and he's awesome.

37
General Board / Re: first day of class
« on: June 20, 2006, 11:06:18 PM »
You should:
Do the assigned reading. It's really bad if you fall behind on the first day.
Try to meet a few people who you like during orientation and sit next to them.
Find out where your classrooms are before the first day so that you're not late
Figure out the parking situation during orientation or earlier.
Get a locker if they're available.

You should NOT:
Be nervous. You'll live and what you say during class will not impact your grade one way or another.
Feel pressured to start your outline. Wait until the end of the week at least.
Read too far ahead.
IM or surf the net the first day of class. There are some professors who live to call students out on the first day.
Be discouraged. The reading will get easier by the third week. You'll get used to it.

38
That's interesting how wrong Kaplan is. Yeah, the pre-law stuff is crap like Jacy said. It's too bad I figured that out now, after I spent a bunch of money on crap.

39
General Board / Re: Any parents out there?
« on: June 19, 2006, 09:21:50 AM »
First, that picture doesn't belong on this thread. Second, it doesn't make sense. John Kerry is only 10 years older than John Edwards - that's not a big age gap. They don't have much in common politically except for party affiliation, either.

40

2.  I think that each one of us has this dilemma, no matter what our actual LSAT score.  No matter where you're at -- 155, 165, 170, whatever... you'll have that choice to factor in: where do you fall in the 25/75 reported LSAT numbers? Did you choose a college where you're at the lower end, or the higher end?  Did it make a difference?  That was my question - is my dilemma a false one?  Does it make a difference?


I didn't have this dilemma either.  For undergrad, I chose a college where I was on the higher end of test results.  It didn't make a difference at all.

I ended up at a law school where I'm at the higher end.  But I didn't choose my school because of that -- I chose it because I like the atmosphere.  This school hadn't even been high on my radar until I got my acceptance letter.  After being accepted, I visited the school and liked it so much that I decided to attend.  I knew I could spend three years there relatively happily.  (And indeed, I've been happy with it so far.)  My classmates are brilliant, our section got along marvelously and I've made great friends, and the professors are great.

The fact that I have statistics on the higher end of the class has made no difference at all.

Your dilemma is a false one.

I picked a school where I'm on the lower end of the LSAT percentile and I picked it because 1)I get in-state tuition and 2)I visited and liked the school. I agree with everybody else that you really have to visit the school to decide whether or not you'll like it.

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