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Messages - Wild Jack Maverick

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51
Indiana - Indianapolis / Re: Letter of Acceptance
« on: December 03, 2005, 02:10:46 PM »
some of the grads are special

52
3L job search / law students and recent law school graduates
« on: December 02, 2005, 06:29:58 PM »
https://www.ilrg.com/cgi-bin/forms/contact.cgi?12

The Opportunity:  Maximilian Ventures LLC, which owns and operates ILRG, is seeking to hire law students and recent law school graduates in the U.S. and Canada to work part-time or full-time on new product and content development

53

In all of my dealings with many law students online and otherwise, I've seen virtually no difference in the education. Of course there are differences in the opportunities available...but nobody is denying that. However, for one who goes into DL with their eyes wide open, understanding the career limitations and understanding the prejudices that will be there for them when they exit the other side, degree in hand...and they decide to do it despite all of this because they know why they are doing it...more power to you. :)

I suppose a student's success would be determined by the type of person he/she really is. I would guess that many of the B.M. (brick and mortar) law students are very social people who could not make it through law school without the social aspect of gathering with other students. The DL law schools are probably not geared for moot court, although the students would have the option of observing at as many actual trials as is convenient.

I would think that there are prejudices no matter what law school a lawyer graduates from. If it is a DL school, it has the DL law school stigma. If it is not a high rated law school, it has the low level law school stigma. If it is a high rated law school, then it is an argument about who went to the better undergrad school, whose scores were better, who had the better professors, which graduating class is better, etc.

It almost seems that unless one student shares a totally identical experience with another student, no one would recognize the qualifications of another as "adequate."

55
General Board / Re: Civ Pro Multiple Choice question
« on: November 25, 2005, 05:48:05 PM »
Anyway, that wasn't my point.

All I'm saying is that it's a civ pro question and shouldn't require analysis of different types of property arrangements, especially if the OP doesn't go to law school in Texas.  How would he know that Texas is a community property state? 

The point is....that there is a reason why George thinks Laura should be joined, besides simply attempting to have Jenna's counterclaim dismissed. The fact that the scenario specifically names two states (instead of any two states) would mean that there is something that the reader should know. The property in question is at Texas, which is a community property state. It would make a difference if George and Laura are married.

I suppose it would also make a difference if a Civ Pro student hadn't yet studied anything about real estate/property law or marital assets.
The community property states are:

 Arizona
 California
 Idaho
 Louisiana
 Nevada
 New Mexico
 Texas
 Washington
 Wisconsin

56
General Board / Re: Civ Pro Multiple Choice question
« on: November 24, 2005, 07:05:56 AM »
I will guess that since Texas is a community property state, and the property was co-owned by the husband and wife, (assuming that the wife did not have POA and the property was not partitioned) the wife did not have the right to convey the property without agreement of the husband? Therefore, without the husband's signature, the property is still legally owned by both George and Laura, and Laura should be joined.

I was thinking about the importance of that fact.  If this is a civ pro question I don't know why it's in there because it requires an analysis of property law.
Notwithstanding the obvious references in the fact pattern, it doesn't say anywhere in the hypo that they are married, it just says joint owners. 

ah, yes. Is that "conjecture?" If so, then how did George and Laura move to Washington, George became a citizen of Washington, but Laura remained a citizen of Texas? (The hypo doesn't say that Laura moved back to Texas.) I suppose George and Laura moved at different times. The hypo does not state that there was a lease, or any agreement for rent--therefore, how could Jenna owe any back rent? The hypo also does not say that Laura actually gave the deed to Jenna, but only that Jenna uses that for her counterclaim.


And for that matter, I have just come from answering various paternity questions. Does George know that Laura was previously married and that Jenna isn't his daughter? Were there bloodtests? Or maybe George is Laura's previous husband, and Jenna is his daughter.

57
General Board / Re: Civ Pro Multiple Choice question
« on: November 23, 2005, 08:08:09 PM »
I will guess that since Texas is a community property state, and the property was co-owned by the husband and wife, (assuming that the wife did not have POA and the property was not partitioned) the wife did not have the right to convey the property without agreement of the husband? Therefore, without the husband's signature, the property is still legally owned by both George and Laura, and Laura should be joined.

58
1L job search / Re: Working for Private Investigator
« on: November 23, 2005, 01:51:28 PM »
many of them are known as "security companies" which hire fomer FBI and are licensed as private detective and investigative agencies

59
1L job search / Re: CIA--Summer Law Clerk
« on: November 23, 2005, 01:44:01 PM »
My sister's husband used to work for a head hunting firm that hired for top secret government positions. The problem was that he wasn't allowed to know what the jobs were because they were top secret. To make it worse, a lot of people who applied couldn't tell him what they had done in the past that made them qualified to do the job they were seeking.

Sounds like fun.


Have you met any of our 'salesmen' yet?     :)

60
To paraphrase a popular president...online law schools will not beat the ABA, they will transcend the ABA...they will not bother to denounce the ABA instead dismiss it as a bizarre organization whos last days of monopoly are already in sight.

ah, voss749, I think you have provided the clue. As a matter of fact, I am just reading about monopolies. You have probably heard of the glass ceiling; I have also noticed what seems as "glass walls" when attempting to enter the legal field. Those barriers of entry are a sign of a pure monopoly. My book describes barriers as economic, technological, legal or some other type.

I suppose that DL law schools are considered as a major threat to the monopolistic industry of law, in that they eliminate the barriers!

You are a genius!

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