Law School Discussion

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Messages - dft

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51
RE: study groups

the vast majority of the stuff can be done more efficiently on your own. i like meeting in groups once in a blue moon for a couple reasons: (1) it forces me to sit down and get some work done, (2) it's a different way of learning and it changes things up a bit so that it doesnt get so boring doing everything on my own, and (3) it helps to see someone else's view on things.

it's good to get away from stuff for awhile, especially towards exam time. it also helps you to gauge your classmates' knowledge. it's tough studying on your own and not knowing whether everyone else knows more than you or not. when you meet up with a study group, you may find that you know more than they do. this has the effect of increasing your confidence a lot. (at least that's what ive found.)

im not advocating using study groups -- i use them very little. but i think they can be helpful if used sparingly.

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pmbr rep.?

One thing I wish I had done early on is register for both barbri and pmbr courses.  First, you get the benefit of locking in the price of bar reveiw courses which increase in price every year, and second, you get free study aids for your courses just for enrolling.  Finally, at my school, barbri showed video lectures of first year law subjects around finals time which many people found helpful.  PMBR is really good for preparing for multi-state type questions that many law professors ask on multiple choice exams, and they've got great audio study aids.  I think that the deposit for PMBR for a 1L is like $100, which goes toward the price of the bar course you are likely to take eventually, and you get like 3 study aids or something for free when you join.  I heard about this website put together by a PMBR rep that makes the enrollment process quick and easy.  It's www.easypmbr.com.  Best of luck in your first year!!!

53
General Board / Re: do i need to have powerpoint for law school?
« on: April 08, 2006, 01:18:16 PM »
just download the powerpoint viewer (supposedly the link above is for this) for free for now.

54
It's just a good book. Simple explanation of the law. Fairly thorough, though not quite as thorough as Dressler's.

Pro's of Dressler's: Better explanation of the law.

Pro's of E&E: Has hypos and explanations of the hypos in it.


Crim law E&E is a piece of *&^%. I follow the PLS approach and still think that... avoid the book at all costs

Are you kidding me? I guess it just goes to show how everyone is different. The Crim Law E&E is my bible for the way my crim law class is taught. I barely read my casebook because its a bunch of crap  but I read the E&E and I am golden.

I agree. The Crim Law E&E is very good.

Why?

55
General Board / Re: Finals
« on: April 06, 2006, 01:33:45 AM »
This semester has been about 1.5 times the amount of work of last semester. I guess they figure we are more efficient now.

I've noticed that all my outlines this semester are about two times longer than last semester. (so maybe twice as much work, who knows)

56
Transferring / Re: professor reccomendations
« on: April 06, 2006, 01:30:05 AM »
I'm considering trying to transfer out of my school to a higher ranked school in the same city. I honestly like the school I'm at now a lot; my main desire for transferring is the enhanced career opportunities due to the higher ranked school (obviously). Should I tell my prof that I really like it here a lot but I'm just doing it for the enhanced career opportunities?

Will she understand/is this a good reason (considering the school is much higher ranked)?

 I think she will, but I'm just wondering if this is the greatest reason to give rather than the BS reasons that I'm going to have to tell the school in my personal statement (i.e. talk about their programs, etc., even though I really just want to go there for the better career opportunities).

she gave me great pointers (besides the obvious get good grades speech)

Also, what pointers did she give you?

57
Crim law E&E is a piece of *&^%. I follow the PLS approach and still think that... avoid the book at all costs

Are you kidding me? I guess it just goes to show how everyone is different. The Crim Law E&E is my bible for the way my crim law class is taught. I barely read my casebook because its a bunch of crap  but I read the E&E and I am golden.

I agree. The Crim Law E&E is very good.

58
Studying and Exam Taking / Re: Law School Prep Courses
« on: April 01, 2006, 01:23:21 AM »
Princeton review and Kaplan are a waste of money.  Go with Testmasters or Powerscore.

seconded

59
Socratic Method / Re: What do grades usually mean?
« on: March 28, 2006, 06:08:17 PM »
I see what you're saying, but...

"Superior just means that it is better than some, higher."

I see "superior" as meaning not just higher than some; I view it is higher than (almost) all. You're right that a "B" grade is significantly higher than a B-, and it's really a pretty good achievement on a B- curve; but still, a B average will put you in probably the top 30-40%, while I think of "superior" as like top 10%.

When I was younger, "B" meant "good" and "A" meant excellent. Maybe my school thought "good" was not indicative of the level of achievement that a "B" grade suggests?

I kind of agree w. your schools grading characterizations.  Superior just means that it is better than some, higher.  So a C is superior than a D, and an A is superior than a B.  So, if you have a B- curve like my school, then B is superior to most people.  So it is appropriate.

On the other hand, excellent tends to imply that someone excels. They do above and beyond what was called for, not just above.  I think an A would be reflective of this.

I don't know if people agree.  I have nothing to back this up, it is just my personal understanding/interpretation of those terms.

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Socratic Method / Re: What do grades usually mean?
« on: March 28, 2006, 01:31:36 AM »
My school's system makes no sense.

A "B" is "superior" yet an "A" is excellent.

I tend to think of the word "superior" as indicative of the highest level of achievement. While "excellent" is still a high level of achievement, I doubt it connotes a higher level than "superior." Thus, this "grading key" makes no sense.

http://www.law.suffolk.edu/offices/registrar/grades.cfm

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