Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.

Messages - Moe Zhust

Pages: [1] 2 3
1
With regards to the trial advocacy and legal writing program. Every school has these courses, and I honestly can't imagine how one is much better/different than another. .... My Legal Writing instructor ... didn't give a poo about teaching us.

The difference, of course, is that at some schools the legal writing program is a focus, not an afterthought, and the profs are very devoted.  USF is such a school.  Legal Writing is graded here, which means the students take it as seriously as the profs. 

2
Location, location, location.

I can say with confidence that USF is a good school.

3
Where should I go next fall? / Re: USF, Idaho: Public Defender?
« on: May 13, 2009, 04:14:28 PM »
My advice is go to USF.  (Full disclosure:  I'm a 1L there)

1) Location, location, location.
2) Unlike many/most law schools, at USF Criminal Procedure is a required first year course.  That means that you will have a leg up over 1Ls from higher-ranked schools when it comes to getting crim-law summer employment that first summer.
3) Many profs and students at USF are very supportive of students with your goals.  Join the Crim Law Society and get to know your Crim Law and Crim Procedure profs and they will help you.
4) Recent changes to the law have made debt repayment and debt forgiveness much easier for people who go on to do public service work.  These changes to the law are still too new to be reflected in many Law Career/Law School Survival books.  Check out recent news articles or just call up Jamal at the USF financial aid office to find out the details.  It might be as easy as working in the public sector for 10 years and your debt goes poof.
5)I'd be more worried about self-identifying as a party animal.  Dude, it's law school.  Get serious.  Get good grades.  You might get a scholarship for your last two years.
6) It's crazy to decline USF and go elsewhere with the intention of then transferring to USF.
7) It's cool that you are certain of your goals, but they might change.  In that case, see 1) above.

Good Luck!  Go Dons!   

4
Law School Applications / Re: Best type of sandwich?
« on: May 13, 2009, 03:43:10 PM »
corned beef

5
true dat

6
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Pacific Mcgeorge
« on: May 13, 2009, 02:43:52 PM »
I looked at McGeorge very closely before deciding on USF for personal reasons.  McGeorge is a good school with a reputation among employers as a place that turns out very good lawyers.  I know a couple of people who went there and liked it. 

7
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Pacific Mcgeorge
« on: May 13, 2009, 02:38:05 PM »
I looked at McGeorge very closely before deciding on USF for personal reasons.  McGeorge is a good school with a reputation among employers as a place that turns out very good lawyers.  I know a couple of people who went there and liked it. 

8
Where should I go next fall? / Re: 3.3/164 accepted nowhere
« on: May 13, 2009, 02:33:23 PM »
Apply early next time.

Retake the LSAT.  (This is the least important of the three)

And apply to some safety schools.  If you're looking at Hastings then apply to USF, which is a great school.  (I'm biased)  Look beyond the rankings. 

9
General board for soon-to-be 1Ls / Re: PREPPING FOR 1L -- HELP
« on: May 13, 2009, 02:26:19 PM »
Avoid Planet Law School.  Somewhere in that fat bad book is a thin good book trying to get out, but it's not worth the slog.

The problem with following its advice and reading all those primers during the summer is that what your actual prof will teach you will amount to only a small fraction of what's covered in the primers.  You will just be wasting your time.  And the most important skill you will be learning is how not to waste your time.

Read a very slim book called Acing Your First Year of Law School.

Read a great book that is too new to show up yet on recommended lists:  What Every Law Student Needs to Know. 

If you want to read more than that, I suggest reading books about the American legal system in general.  Popular books like Toobin's the Nine.  Just being familiar with state vs. federal courts, trial vs. appellate courts, etc. will give you a big head start.

10
I have a slightly different take on this.....

Wait to see what your professor's STYLE is like, not so much what he or she recommends.

If the prof is very clear about, say, teaching the rules, but you are not sure how all the pieces fit together, get "narrative" supplements that bring out the big picture, like Nutshells or the Insights and Concepts series.

If the prof talks broadly in class but leaves you mystified as to how to crystallize the rules, much less how to apply them, get commercial outlines.

The E&E series is OK but frustrating because you will not be sure, upon doing the questions, whether your prof has taught the specific point of law being tested.

Don't overlook the computer exercises at CALI.org which are free once you get a password, which your school may supply.

Avoid canned case briefs at all costs.

Basically, realize that different types of supplements meet different needs, and your needs for each class will be different depending on your interest in the topic/professor/learning style, etc.   Spend some time in the library (free) just sampling what's out there and what fits best for you.

Good luck

Pages: [1] 2 3