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Messages - ieatpoo

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1
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Brooklyn vs. Cardozo
« on: April 15, 2007, 10:23:44 PM »
Additionally, those prices are based on some non-descript area of Manhattan. Living closer to Harlem or in the West Village (let alone in Brooklyn or Queens) results in different rates than Midtown.

What you say holds true for every city and thus reveals nothing. The prices are based on some non-descript area in each city. Living in a less desirable or more remote part of any of these cities (Philly, NY, Atlanta, etc) would result in different rates. 
Honestly, are you trying to say that it evens out? Lets not try to compare the nicest areas of Manhattan vs. the nicest areas of Philly. Midtown is as expensive as it gets & is exponentially more expensive than other areas of NYC. In Brooklyn I'm paying a fraction of what it would cost to live in Midtown. I know you are going to defend your post tooth & nail, but it is simply wrong. I'm going to be making NYC biglaw salary & I don't expect to have to live on Ramen Noodles & PEZ.

Its not very Dude-like to say that you're going to be making BigLaw salary.

2
Don Pepe's which is an amazing Portugese restaurant, is about 10 feet from Seton Hall.  I could jump from my classroom to the parking lot (which sometimes I feel like doing).  Also the Commerce Food Court is right across the street.  Many people working in the nearby office buildings go there for lunch.  They have amazing Chinese and Indian food (if you like that.)

3
I'm at 2L at Seton Hall and I've been living in Newark for about a year now.  I've never felt unsafe and I haven't had any problems even when walking around at night.

4
Affirmative Action / Re: I wish...
« on: April 03, 2007, 02:11:07 AM »
I understand what you're saying, but AdComs don't add points on to the LSATs of minority students.  They got what they got on the LSAT, AdComs can't arbitrarily add points because of race.  This type of point adding was unconstitutional under Gratz v. Bollinger.  Perhaps a minority got in over a white person who scored higher on the LSAT.  This doesn't mean points were added on to his/her score.  Instead they looked at other factors such as the type of diversity this person could bring to the law school.

5

i can't tell that ieatpoo doesn't live in newark.

the only reason that anyone would find newark "safe" is if they stay locked up in their apartments.

i've noticed that everyone stays in a limited area ("the green zone") and does not deviate from that zone.  if you actually walk around newark and depart from the safe zone, you'll witness some crazy sh*t.  i've had the pleasure of almost getting robbed three times and even saw a homeless man giving fellatio to some fellow.  that's on top of seeing people living in the Penn Station doorway every night that i walk home. i guess i still haven't become desensitized to seeing people living in squalor and despair. i'm sure that being an opportunistic, heartless lawyer will help me overcome that.

in any case, Newark's a splendid place to live and raise a family.

a wonderful community as well.

I live in the Vailsburg section with two other students, actually  And those things you saw and experienced, you would see and experience in any city, but why would you be in those areas?  The area around the law school, which is where the students would be, is safe.

6
Affirmative Action / Re: I wish...
« on: April 02, 2007, 05:36:57 PM »

Well said.  Simply put, law schools lie.


People FOIA'ed some public school admit records (Boalt, Michigan, etc) and it's fairly obvious the law schools lie.  Diversity doesn't matter.  Skin color does.

Schools lied through their teeth and said AA is just a minor boost in marginal cases.  That's not it at all.  Whether or not they'll admit to it, AA ends up as a 10ish point bump in the LSAT for every, single black applicant.



New court is going to tear them to shreds.

Oh boy, I'd love to know where you got these statistics, so unless you can provide a link, I'll assume you're making it up.   Again you're only looking at the fact that it is unfair to whites, and (I assume) yourself. 

http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/scripts/getcase.pl?court=US&vol=000&invol=02-241

"In recent years there has been virtually no change, for example, in the proportion of law school applicants with LSAT scores of 165 and higher who are black. In 1993 blacks constituted 1.1% of law school applicants in that score range, though they represented 11.1% of all applicants. Law School Admission Council, National Statistical Report (1994) (hereinafter LSAC Statistical Report). In 2000 the comparable numbers were 1.0% and 11.3%. LSAC Statistical Report (2001)."

Is this in reference to what I said?  I'm not sure if this is supposed to back me up or refute what I was saying because its so out of context.  It does not indicate that being black gives you 10 more points on your LSAT however...so I'm not sure what the point of this is...

God you're stupid.


I'm off this thread.

Ok, not sure what that was in reference to.  Again, I feel like I have to explain this to you.  They don't get points added to their LSAT!!!  You may think they do because they may get in over a white who has scored higher, but their acceptance is based on their experiences, and other soft factors that a test can not measure.  You haven't shown me that AdComs added ten points on to their LSAT!!  Just remember this.  It's so easy to hate, comdemn, and ridicule (history has proven this) but so hard to understand, empathize, and love.  Please don't grow up to hate.  I know its hard for you, since you're so set in your opinions, but try to understand.  Try to understand what its like growing up dirt poor in a broken home, try to understand what its like when your own country hates you.  Please?

7
Affirmative Action / Re: I wish...
« on: April 02, 2007, 05:26:59 PM »

Well said.  Simply put, law schools lie.


People FOIA'ed some public school admit records (Boalt, Michigan, etc) and it's fairly obvious the law schools lie.  Diversity doesn't matter.  Skin color does.

Schools lied through their teeth and said AA is just a minor boost in marginal cases.  That's not it at all.  Whether or not they'll admit to it, AA ends up as a 10ish point bump in the LSAT for every, single black applicant.



New court is going to tear them to shreds.

Oh boy, I'd love to know where you got these statistics, so unless you can provide a link, I'll assume you're making it up.   Again you're only looking at the fact that it is unfair to whites, and (I assume) yourself. 

http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/scripts/getcase.pl?court=US&vol=000&invol=02-241

"In recent years there has been virtually no change, for example, in the proportion of law school applicants with LSAT scores of 165 and higher who are black. In 1993 blacks constituted 1.1% of law school applicants in that score range, though they represented 11.1% of all applicants. Law School Admission Council, National Statistical Report (1994) (hereinafter LSAC Statistical Report). In 2000 the comparable numbers were 1.0% and 11.3%. LSAC Statistical Report (2001)."

Is this in reference to what I said?  I'm not sure if this is supposed to back me up or refute what I was saying because its so out of context.  It does not indicate that being black gives you 10 more points on your LSAT however...so I'm not sure what the point of this is...

8
Affirmative Action / Re: I wish...
« on: April 02, 2007, 05:21:56 PM »
I took calculus with a few wanna-be doctors who couldn't do algebra.


Same thing with economics.



This is at Harvard FFS.




How did "diversity of being able to do algebra" positively affect my learning process?

You don't do math in law school.  And is math the only subject you take?  Do you take any classes where people exchange views?  I suppose that nothing I say can convince you that diversity of opinion, experience, and viewpoint is important the educational process.  Hopefully, you will find out one day.

9
Affirmative Action / Re: I wish...
« on: April 02, 2007, 01:50:53 PM »

Well said.  Simply put, law schools lie.


People FOIA'ed some public school admit records (Boalt, Michigan, etc) and it's fairly obvious the law schools lie.  Diversity doesn't matter.  Skin color does.

Schools lied through their teeth and said AA is just a minor boost in marginal cases.  That's not it at all.  Whether or not they'll admit to it, AA ends up as a 10ish point bump in the LSAT for every, single black applicant.



New court is going to tear them to shreds.

Oh boy, I'd love to know where you got these statistics, so unless you can provide a link, I'll assume you're making it up.  Again you're only looking at the fact that it is unfair to whites, and (I assume) yourself.  However, I feel that diversity (which you haven't mentioned) is a wonderful thing in the classroom.  If you can honestly say that diversity has no impact on education or the learning process, then I'd have to call you ignorant.  The classroom is the one place where ideas and views can be expressed, discussed, and debated, but this debate won't occur if everyone has the same views.  People might not realize how important this is because they haven't been exposed to it!  You can not honestly say the educational experience will not be enhanced with a class that includes discussions from the different viewpoints that people of different races and different experiences hold.  I'd like to propose an idea.  If you feel that AA affects you so much and injures you in a concrete way sue an institution that has discriminated against you.  Have you been discriminated against?  Has anyone white person on this board been discriminated against?  If so, stop complaining and do something.  For once in history, there might be a policy that doesn't favor white people (even though I think it does because it exposes them to new ideas and experiences)!  OH MY GOD!  The horror!   

10
Anyway if you have any other questions I'd be glad to answer them.   

I'm very interested in hearing about the housing situation. Where do most of the students live? How do you like it? How are the rooms? Anything like that you could tell me (us) would be greatly appreciated.

A fair amount of students live at home and take the train or drive to school.  However, a fair number also live in off campus apartments in Newark, Hoboken, and surrounding areas.  There are a lot of choices, but Seton Hall helps to facilitate the process.  They have a tremendous amount of resources on http://law.shu.edu/administration/student_services/housing/Housing.htm.  Some of my friends live in the Renaissance Towers which are very close to the law school.  The area is extremely safe and the apartments are very nice; much nicer than my apartments in college.
As to the age of the students, many of the students do come out straight out of college.  I'd say about half my class is coming straight out of college the other half being mid twenties and a few in their 30s and 40s.  However, everyone is extremely nice here, and no one really competes against each other.

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