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Messages - General2010

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1
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: W&L 1L Taking Questions
« on: March 17, 2008, 05:28:31 PM »
Confirmed. Housing options here are awesome.

2
Visits, Admit Days, and Open Houses / Re: WUSTL and W&L
« on: March 13, 2008, 08:11:09 PM »
My problem is not really the smallness of the town (except that I am afraid I won't be able to find an allergist) but with its remoteness. I've just never lived that far from an intl airport. And I have a SO back home so I was hoping to live somewhere that's easy to fly in/out of for weekend visits but that's not going to be the case here.

1. That's an incredible picture you have there.
2. Yeah, it can be annoying having to drive to be able to fly places. There are a lot of people here with long distance SOs, and they've all made it work (one girl is dating a guy who is stationed in Puerto Rico for the Coast Guard).

3
Visits, Admit Days, and Open Houses / Re: WUSTL and W&L
« on: March 12, 2008, 08:41:35 AM »
Without getting my head bitten off- W&L is in a really small, remote town. It is not for everyone

Not going to bite of your head, but your statement is somewhat misleading. Yes, Lexington is pretty small--somewhere between 5,000 and 7,000 people live here. I'm on a first name basis with the guy at the post office (his name is Skinny, which is quite an ironic nickname for him), I run into W&L students who I know EVERYWHERE that I go, and it can get a little old eating at Southern Inn (good restaurant in town) every weekend. That being said, Lexington is certainly not your average Southern small town. Lexington is very quaint and historic, and has many more things going on for it than most towns its size because of W&L and VMI. There are a lot of good sandwich places and restaurants in town, a few bars (I wouldn't mind a few more) and it really isn't that remote--Roanoke and Charlottesville are both within an hour's drive, and Richmond, Charlotte and DC are all within 3.5 hours. I grew up in Austin, a pretty large city in Texas known for its music scene and great local food, and I love it here. Like one of the earlier posters said, the benefits that come with living in Lexington greatly outweigh the negatives, especially for a law school experience. That being said, I agree that it's not for everyone. For someone who has lived in NYC their whole life, I'm sure the place can be somewhat of a culture shock. I had my reservations about the town, and everything changed when I visited during the ASW (which I highly recommend if you get the chance).

Most of the people at W&L agree with what you are saying. To be honest, I think it is nice to be in a place where you know the postman and have war history around you. My main point was that being in small rural town that is 3.5 to 4 hours away from a major city might be too isolated an environment for many people.

Oh, I completely agree. I'm just saying, when I think of a "small rural town," I think of a town with one main street surrounded by fast-food chains and little else to do.

4
Visits, Admit Days, and Open Houses / Re: WUSTL and W&L
« on: March 11, 2008, 07:55:24 PM »
Without getting my head bitten off- W&L is in a really small, remote town. It is not for everyone

Not going to bite of your head, but your statement is somewhat misleading. Yes, Lexington is pretty small--somewhere between 5,000 and 7,000 people live here. I'm on a first name basis with the guy at the post office (his name is Skinny, which is quite an ironic nickname for him), I run into W&L students who I know EVERYWHERE that I go, and it can get a little old eating at Southern Inn (good restaurant in town) every weekend. That being said, Lexington is certainly not your average Southern small town. Lexington is very quaint and historic, and has many more things going on for it than most towns its size because of W&L and VMI. There are a lot of good sandwich places and restaurants in town, a few bars (I wouldn't mind a few more) and it really isn't that remote--Roanoke and Charlottesville are both within an hour's drive, and Richmond, Charlotte and DC are all within 3.5 hours. I grew up in Austin, a pretty large city in Texas known for its music scene and great local food, and I love it here. Like one of the earlier posters said, the benefits that come with living in Lexington greatly outweigh the negatives, especially for a law school experience. That being said, I agree that it's not for everyone. For someone who has lived in NYC their whole life, I'm sure the place can be somewhat of a culture shock. I had my reservations about the town, and everything changed when I visited during the ASW (which I highly recommend if you get the chance).

5
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: Vandy vs. Emory
« on: March 10, 2008, 07:44:44 PM »
Outside of job prospects, which I believe Vandy has a serious edge in this case, I would consider the culture of the student body. When I visited Vandy, I loved all of the people I came in contact with and found it to be a very friendly, collegial place to study law. Although I have never visited Emory, I had no desire to because of the horror stories I heard from close friends about bad visiting experiences at Emory Law in terms of dealing with rude, unfriendly, overcompetitive people. Obviously not all of Emory is like this and I haven't visited so this is just hearsay, but school culture is definitely something I'd consider.

6
Kdubstar has the right idea--flights into Roanoke or any of the smaller airports in the surrounding areas (Charlottesville, Lynchburg, etc.) are usually incredibly expensive unless it's a non-stop flight (coming from Atlanta or Charlotte, for example). When I want to go home to Texas, I usually fly out of Richmond (about two hours exactly) for pretty cheap, or out of Washington Dulles (2:15-2:30) for cheaper and a better chance of a non-stop flight.

If you have a choice of weekends that you're choosing from, I'd definitely try to visit during the Accepted Students' Weekend--you'll have a chance to meet tons of current law students and really get more of an idea as to the culture of the school instead of just visiting on a different weekend (plus, the school will pay the $200 stipend, lodging expenses, and they provide free (and nice) meals/drinks the entire time). Feel free to PM me if you have any questions.

7
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: The Texas Job Market
« on: March 05, 2008, 10:42:50 AM »
To answer an earlier question, networking doesn't involve just going to bar functions and receptions and striking up conversations with lawyers. Oftentimes it can involve cold-calling alums from your law school and trying to start a relationship. Maybe try to set up a lunch for when you're in Dallas next. If your school has a dedicated alumni base, they will most likely be more than happy to try to help you out.

8
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: Wake Vs. Georgia
« on: February 27, 2008, 10:40:02 AM »
Have you visited both? Which one did you like better? Go with that because all other things are pretty equal. I'd vote UGA because I find in general UGA is a happier place than Wake, and Athens is a happier place than Winston-Salem.

9
I didn't believe this when I heard this, but one of my friends told me that NYU is apparently pretty fun. I still don't believe it, but does anyone have any insight on this? Maybe we should consider which schools are the least fun. I'd place my money on Duke or Chicago.
Why were you expecting NYU not to be fun?

I could see attending NYU and having the experience of living in NYC be fun, but I'm thinking more specifically in terms of the student body of the school and the social activities for law students. I would assume NYU to be hyper-competitive (even though it's such a good school it doesn't have to be). And I may be way off here, but if it is anything like the undergrad, then I would expect there to be many affected "I'm so intellectual and dark and pissed off at my rich parents for giving me a great upbringing and education" types. Like I said though, I don't have personal experience with NYU Law so this is just speculation for me. Correct me if I'm wrong.

10
Going to guess that Texas falls under the "West South Central" category, so 3% placement is something to consider.

Well, it's not necessarily placement as that might imply that lots of people want to go there and can't. I think (no empirical evidence) that a large part of it is self-selection. Most everyone here just talks about wanting to go to Chicago or New York so that's not to say that they couldn't/didn't get jobs in TX.

I agree that it's most likely due to self-selection, but I'm just saying that WUSTL's alumni network in Texas is pretty small.

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