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General Board / Re: Cold Feet
« on: September 11, 2011, 03:30:28 PM »
Please note that's why I wrote: "Alright, I understand that most of you are probably scratching your head at the fact that the reasoning I relate most to comes from Tucker Max, of all people. Nonetheless, despite the source of the reasoning, I still find myself agreeing with it."

It's not that I'm taking advice from him specifically, it's just that my point of view happens to be congruent with his. The reason I quoted him is because his feelings are exactly the same as my own, and he just happens to express them more eloquently than I could, I think.


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General Board / Cold Feet
« on: September 05, 2011, 03:04:25 PM »
Hi everyone,

I am from Canada. I just graduated with a combined degree (that's two degrees, the second one requiring a fifth year of undergrad) in Economics and Political Science. I graduated with a 4.0. I have been practicing the LSAT for about two months now, I average high 160's.

So here's my dilemma: Throughout my entire academic career I have operated under the assumption that I was going to law school. Ever since I was 15 years old, when people asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up, I said "lawyer". I went to university under this assumption. I started out in poli sci, because that is what "all" pre-law kids take. I then decided to also take econ, since that is what all "smart" pre-law kids take. In first year I loved what I was doing. In second year, I loved it less. In third year, I started to dislike poli, at which point I also took on econ. By fourth year, I started to dislike both, and the thought actually occured to me of "what if I don't go to law school"?

It was at this point roughly a year ago that I actually seriously started wondering about whether I WANTED to go to law school. After doing some research I realized that I don't think I do. I find my feelings toward the practice of law and law school in general are most succintly summerized by Tucker Max (taken from the FAQ section of his website):

Should I get my JD? What is your advice for someone thinking about going into law school?
Do you want to waste three years of your life debating stupid and utterly irrelevant minutia? Then yes, get your JD. Do you want to get a degree that allows you work the rest of your life in a tedious, bad, unrewarding job? Then yes, get your JD. Are you a boring, facile, socially retarded whore, desperate for the illusion of money and success, regardless of the cost to your life and the lives of those you love? Then yes, get your JD. Do you want to squander your existence sitting in a lifeless office, churning out ultimately meaningless paperwork? Then yes, get your JD. Listen to me people: There is a reason that lawyers have the LOWEST job satisfaction of any profession in America. THE JOB SUCKS. It is horrible.

Alright, I understand that most of you are probably scratching your head at the fact that the reasoning I relate most to comes from Tucker Max, of all people. Nonetheless, despite the source of the reasoning, I still find myself agreeing with it. I have talked to many, many lawyers. Some are associates, some are partners. Some work in corporate, others government, others litgation. They all love their jobs... but they love their jobs because they love the work. They love the law, they love the money, and they don't mind working 70 hours a week to make it.

I'm just not sure this is me, I don't think I love the law, I don't think it's what I'm passionate about, and I certainly don't want to do something for 70+ hours a week that I hate. So I guess my question is this: What would you do if you were me? My whole life I've created this bubble around me of becoming a lawyer, and the pressure is imense. I feel like if I don't I'll have wasted five years of school, a lot of potential, and have let a lot of people down.

I am writing the LSAT this October, I am applying to different schools for next fall. If I have an epiphany in the next year I at least want to have the option of still going.


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