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Messages - Miami88

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2
Some bottom T law schools (the one with a C that tries to hide behind a new shiny W for example) have what they CALL "midterms" which equate to about 10% of the grade for first term students and are almost entirely multiple choice. But even if that is what he is judging his grades on (which sadly might be true) having a 3.0 would place him in the middle of his class. Meaning he sucks at even the EASY test.

Dang kid. You BELONG where you are. No wonder everyone hates you and you want to run away.


Email the schools if you don't believe me. And stop posting pics of your mom.



3
Some bottom T law schools (the one with a C that tries to hide behind a new shiny W for example) have what they CALL "midterms" which equate to about 10% of the grade for first term students and are almost entirely multiple choice. But even if that is what he is judging his grades on (which sadly might be true) having a 3.0 would place him in the middle of his class. Meaning he sucks at even the EASY test.

Dang kid. You BELONG where you are. No wonder everyone hates you and you want to run away.


4
doubt transferring at this point is realistic. at least, not to any better of a situation than you are in now.

your best bet is to stick it out for the first year and transfer as a 2L.

unless you have extremely legitimate personal issues (e.g. your entire family was just slaughtered in front of you at your family reunion and you needed time to regroup), dropping out and reapplying now will be transparent.

5
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: 153 LSAT 3.7 GPA - What do I do now?
« on: October 23, 2015, 08:23:12 AM »
I agree. If you were within 3-5 points of your average, it is unlikely worth it to retake. But being 7 points away from your average is statistically severe. I would figure out what went wrong and hit the books.

This is even more so the case given that you have a 3.7.

6
I would strongly recommend re-writing from scratch (and your school's pre-law advisor and/or writing center may be able to help).

Here are a few broad notes:

1) Consistency. It's either "I have" or "I've." Pick one. I would strongly suggest "I have" because "I've" is a bit informal. Also, keep an eye on your tense. If you are talking about the past, you the past-tense.

2) Whether true or not - you probably don't want to lead your PS with an explanation of why Law & Order motivated you to become a lawyer. I'm not saying you can't do it, but unless it is impeccably done, it makes you sound trite.

3) Also, whether true or not - things like "writing in legal terms is my career goal" is equally odd. It makes you sound insincere.

4) I would delete the first full paragraph - it adds nothing to your story.

5) Cut down your sentence length. Once you start approaching 20 or 25 words, you should get to a period. Example:

"My first job came when I was in my early teens working for a summer job, I was in need of a job because my mother was a struggling parent with no father around, and any help that I can offer I knew would be vital for the family."

can be written as:

My mother was a struggling parent with no father around. Any help that I could offer would be vital for the family. So, when I was in my early teens, I got my first job.

which can be re-written as:

My mother was a struggling parent. My father was not around. My family needed my help. So, on my thirteenth birthday, I got my first job.

6) Drop superfluous phrases. You use phrases "like most kids in high school" or "I knew that I..." Drop those phrases entirely. They add nothing to your story or your rhetoric.

7) You talk quite a bit about things that are likely on your resume. There is nothing wrong with bringing it up, but make sure that you are adding to your story. In other words, don't just say things like "I have X degree" and leave it at that. If you are going to talk about your degree, talk about the context behind it. For example, why you chose that degree; what you have done with it; how you think it will help you moving forward; etc.

8) Drop things that are (should be) obvious. Don't tell admissions that you promise to study hard. At best, these phrases will take up space - space that you can use for beneficial points. At worst, admissions may take it as a signal that you may not be willing to study as hard as you can and are saying this in order to compensate. Again, it's better to just leave these things implied. Imply that you will study hard with your impeccably written PS.


What you have is a great first draft - you put onto paper your background and aspirations. Now comes the hard part - making that into a unique, compelling story.

Good luck!

7
Current Law Students / Re: Crazy how numbers have changed
« on: September 23, 2015, 06:16:53 PM »
Well I should do actual work now.

get them billables

8
Studying for the LSAT / Re: 162 to 170 before October LSAT?
« on: September 18, 2015, 01:18:27 PM »
So, a few things.

Is it even realistic to expect this big of a jump in my score with only 3 weeks left?

A:

No. It is extremely unrealistic to expect anything significant to happen in 3 weeks, particularly when those 3 weeks are near the end of your studying prior to an exam. Realistically, you are looking at getting a 157-168ish on the real thing right now.

Recommendation:

You are unusual than most of the people that post on here; you have a 3.93 GPA from a top school. That is huge. If you can get into the high 160s on the LSAT, you are a looking at T14. If you can break into the 170s, you are looking at T6 if not T3. Right now, if you get a 160, you are looking at T30/50. There is nothing wrong with T30, but the outputs are noticeably different than T6.

So now is where we come to a crossroads. You need to seriously ask yourself what your values are - what are you really trying to get out of law school. It sounds like you have what it takes to get into at least the high 160s/low 170s - but it will take more than what you are doing now. I ended up getting in the high 160s - but I put in 8 hrs/day for 6 months.  I went through every single published test, most under timed conditions  and at least 15 full test conditions.

Now, if you aren't even remotely interested in big law or fancy fed. clerkships, than screw it. Take the LSAT now - you will get into a great law school. But if you are interested in big law/clerkships (which have their owns set of pros and cons) or if you want to get scholarship money - it may be worth it to stick it out until February or even June.

Good luck!

9
you need to focus your mental energy on things that are within your control. anything that is not within your control is pointless to think about. right now, the only thing that you can focus on is preparing for the LSAT. at this point, that means working through prior exams and reviewing your mistakes. repeat.

as for what score you need to get into what school.... forget it. it is all speculation at this point. the score you need is the best score that you can get. period. let what come come. we can worry about what school that translates into after the exam. but for now, just focus on killing the LSAT.

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