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Messages - "Legapp" Stands for "Legal Application"

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1
General Board / Re: Jr. BigLaw Associate in NY Taking Questions
« on: July 27, 2009, 12:20:56 PM »
a legapp sighting?

good luck on tuesday.  wave if you see me.

LOL, might be hard among the 5,000 other people....  ;)

2
General Board / Re: Jr. BigLaw Associate in NY Taking Questions
« on: July 26, 2009, 10:19:10 PM »
Silly Q but--did you bring your own lunch?  Are there places to eat way out on 12th ave?  I've never been to the Javits.

Also can we bring soda/water in, or only what's in thet little baggie Barbri gave us?

Thanks!

I think that's one of the most slept on aspects of the entire bar taking process - LUNCH!

Especially around Javits. There is NOTHING around there!!!!!!!!!!  Seriously there are like 2 or 3 little deli places and believe you me, all 8 or 9 thousand people will be there standing in line for the entire hour (or whatever it is) you get for lunch.

I parked my car overnight across the street in a paid parking lot for like $20 bucks, packed my lunch in a cooler and put it in the trunk of my car.  As soon as the lunch break came I walked straight to my car and spent at most 10 minutes eating and then spent the rest of the hour refreshing my memory on the two essay subjects that I knew were coming because they were not tested in the morning (family law and corporations).  Sure enough, those two subjects were the two essays in the afternoon, so I probably earned a few more points on those essays. Hey, every point counts right?



This is genius!  My fiance is making the trip with me, so I think I will ask him to meet me for lunch with a good sandwich and some flashcards/outlines.   :)

3
General Board / Re: Jr. BigLaw Associate in NY Taking Questions
« on: July 26, 2009, 02:43:41 PM »
Silly Q but--did you bring your own lunch?  Are there places to eat way out on 12th ave?  I've never been to the Javits.

Also can we bring soda/water in, or only what's in thet little baggie Barbri gave us?

Thanks!

4
General Board / Re: Jr. BigLaw Associate in NY Taking Questions
« on: July 26, 2009, 02:13:00 PM »
Sands, any NY Bar advice?  I am waaay behind on the NY subjects, so I will be doing my best to learn prof resp, sec trans, com paper, and family law all this weekend (ok on ny practice, trusts, and wills).  Should I even bother with partnership and agency, and those little ny subjects?

Even Javits-specific advice would help... I've heard it's a nightmare there.... anywhere I can go to escape the crazy horde of recent law grads for lunch?

In re exam day, see here.

In re NY bar advice, see here.

Thanks for the links!  Your NY Qs sound horrible.... only 2/5 with a multistate subject mentioned?!  And your MPT scares me... but hopefully the NY Examiners got that out of their systems.  Back to studying...

5
General Board / Re: Jr. BigLaw Associate in NY Taking Questions
« on: July 25, 2009, 05:47:25 AM »
Sands, any NY Bar advice?  I am waaay behind on the NY subjects, so I will be doing my best to learn prof resp, sec trans, com paper, and family law all this weekend (ok on ny practice, trusts, and wills).  Should I even bother with partnership and agency, and those little ny subjects?

Even Javits-specific advice would help... I've heard it's a nightmare there.... anywhere I can go to escape the crazy horde of recent law grads for lunch?

6
General Board / Re: Clerkship letters of recommendation?
« on: June 25, 2009, 02:00:30 AM »
The last post is spot-on, but in addition you should make an effort to go see that professor in person.  Discuss your goals, and give him a copy of your resume and transcript.  Know what your dream clerkships are, and don't be shy about conveying this.

While it is fine to have 1-2 recs from teachers who merely know you as a student who earned an A, in an ideal world you would be close enough to at least one professor with whom you can have an extended version of the above discussion.  Ask this prof which clerkships s/he thinks are right for you, and then ask if s/he would be willing to make a call to any of them.

7
General Board / Re: Absurdity of Firm Bidding
« on: June 25, 2009, 01:49:36 AM »
In addition to what has already been mentioned, talk to others in the legal profession, preferably in the market in which you hope to work.  Ask which firms have the best reputations for quality work (and ideally quality of life).  This year, you'll want to be particularly attuned to a firm's financial health, so in addition to searching for various firms on ATL you should also read legal trades (Amlaw, NLJ, etc.) and speak to your contacts.

You may think you have no contacts, but unless you're looking to work in an obscure location, you probably have access to people who know something about firms in your chosen area(s).  The most obvious group would be professors who worked, taught, or attended school in that city--a quick search of your school's website should uncover who these professors are.  In my case, I mentioned to a law school classmate that I was very interested in a narrow legal specialty, and she connected me with a practitioner in that specialty who was happy to talk through my firm list with me.  One of the best things about attending a T14 is that your classmates are more likely to have these types of connections--use them!

8
General Board / Re: Advice: Grades Took A Long Walk Off a Short Cliff
« on: June 25, 2009, 01:40:07 AM »
The key issue here is your debt load. If you're paying full price for a T4, you should consider taking time off to work. 

9
I would not go so far as to say that academic performance is irrelevant to career success, but I would say that if I ever find myself in a position to hire law school graduates, class rank will not be in my top three factors.  It is true that grades, standardized tests, and academic ability are key signs that a person is intelligent.  It is also likely that intellect is a necessary condition for career success.  That being the case, it is certainly not sufficient, and does not come close to actual professional experience in terms of predicting actual career performance.  When I was interviewing for big firm SA positions, I was actually told to "play down" my prior professional experience.  Apparently, big firms prefer young, pliable recent graduates with little to no work experience, who can be "molded" to fit their culture.  It's certainly their prerogative, but it seems foolish (at best) that they shun potential hires because of their experience.  Again, if it were up to me, I would just prefer to hire the "hungry" applicant who rides just above the curve, but who has piled up on moot court, journal, and internship experiences, and who will work for a reasonable salary.  The firms that wake up and learn this lesson will likely find themselves with a crop of motivated, successful attorneys, who are elated to work for half of what big firms pay.  

In my law school class, the students who "piled up" the most extracurricular achievements were largely the same people who received some form of honors.  The #1 person in our class, for example, was on the LR board, got to the finals of our school-wide moot court competition, and interned with a legal services organization. Another magna/coif was on LR, interned for a legal services org, published several articles, and started an international human rights organization.  People who work hard to get good grades tend to work hard at life, as well.  I would further add that all journals are not created equal; our LR publishes 3x as many issues as our secondary journals.  If someone can work 20 hours per week on LR and still get good grades, that sends a positive signal about that person's work ethic.

While such people may have once expected salaries of $160k, everyone understands the market has changed.  People--even those at T14s--will be happy to get any type of job that enables them to pay their bills.  If you doubt this, consider that at my T14 our LRAP programs has encountered problems covering students' loan burdens this year because so many people in my class chose to go to job that pay less than $45k.

The assumption that is most problematic in your analysis, however, is that these new firms will hire grads straight out of law school.  Why would they?  The contraction in the legal market has thrust hundreds of experienced lawyers into unemployment.  Right now, these people are happy just to do doc review for an hourly wage, when that work is even possible.  They would gratefully accept $80k to do proper legal work again.  These new firms, going forward, can then adopt the model that midlaw firms currently use, which involves laterally hiring burned-out Biglaw associates.

Bottom line: law students and recent graduates are in big trouble.  The best option, if you can get it, is to obtain a clerkship and hope that real-world experience will count for something.

10
General board for soon-to-be 1Ls / Re: UPenn 3L Taking Questions
« on: April 20, 2009, 04:01:57 AM »
1.  If you're taking exams on a Mac, you need Bootcamp.  I used it and it worked fine.
2.  That sounds right.  Does it matter?  It's not like your classes will be a surprise, and how would you know any teachers besides a random one or two at the ASW?

BTW, live in Center City.

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