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Messages - Pithypike

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1
Studying for the LSAT / Re: LGB
« on: June 25, 2008, 10:50:53 AM »
Is the updated LG Bible worth buying? 

2
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Dec 06 LG section
« on: June 12, 2008, 06:21:47 PM »
Anybody else find this LG section a bit harder than most of the other modern (post June 005) LGs?

I went -8 on the section when I am usually no worse than -3 or -4. 

3
It bothers me because I am facing reverse discrimination for something that was not my responsibility for something that my family had not part in due to the fact that my grandparents didn't enter this country until the beginning of the 20th century.

WTF?  Your grandparents came to a colonized country where the original inhabitants were systemically murdered and/or their culture assimilated/appropriated - even during their lifetimes and those of their children. 

Or do you only consider African-American slavery to be the "sin" for which whites are expected to "atone"?    What about wholesale theft of two entire continents?

Um, if you could go ahead and use European-American that would be grrrrreeattt.  I find the term "whites" HIGHLY offensive.  kthxbi

Edit: Why should whites be forced to atone for the sins of past groups based only on the correlation in skin color? If anybody drew a similar generalization about AAs it would be condemned as racist.....


4
Yeah, it is.  That is my point.  If what I said was racist then these guys are just as racist, since they have made the exact same statements. I was making a point. 

5
Discussions about race invariably give birth to rage and anger, this is a undeniable fact due to the history between whites and blacks.  Your response about Immortal Technique is making my point in a sense, in that you are concentrating on one specific song instead of a body of work.  Do young black youths listen to "mainstream" rap music...yes.  They have no choice, it's not as if a inner city child has access to the internet or has the monetary means to purchase mutltiple albums so they can build a catalog of music and listen to what they want.  The television programming is largely controlled by Caucasian Americans who in my view could care less about the plight of young African Americans.  Secondly, to assume that middle-class to wealthy black students are taking advantage of Affirmative Action and that they do not come from diverse backgrounds is false.  I myself have parents who worked from being below the poverty line to upper middle class and I can assure you that I have as diverse a background as any when it pertains to attending an all white catholic school in the inner city but then going home to an all black inner city neighborhood.  Then moving to the suburbs and attending a predominatly white high school, although I must say that we did have a good number of African American students as well.  I am not sure how being the only African American in my class has been an advantage throughout my schooling.  If anything I have been ostracized by whites the same way you think that blacks would ostracize me too.  Conclusively, colleges do not look for URM's to have diverse backgrounds, they look for them to add diversity to the incoming class.  They assume that a URM will have a background that is different in some way to the majority of the incoming class on a racial level, just as they assume a great LSAT score from a student suggests that they will succeed or excel in law school.

Good points, but I still don't see how a privileged black kid that has NOT had the diverse experiences you have had would contribute anything more to a discussion than a white kid born into similarly privileged situation.  You're right about the PS thing, it would pretty much force URMs to write about their minority status.  I don't know what the right answer is for taking diversity into account, but I don't think it is presuming that racial background automatically gives rise to a certain set of experiences, thought it is probably the most accurate way to achieve diversity without forcing URMs to write about their diversity of experiences.   
 

6
You're not saying anything new, dumbshit. That's what everyone meant when they told you to read the f-ing thread. I assure you, it's been hashed out by greater minds than yours. Well and truly.

Now kindly piss off. Or start your own thread.

Wow.  That is a lot of arrogance and a lot of anger.  Why would you automatically assume you are so superior to me?  Seems unfounded and not particularly logical.   

I read the thread.  You're going to have to show me where the RSF and Fryer were brought up, because I couldn't find it......

Edit: you learn alot more from having specific beliefs challenged then reading an ongoing dialogue between others, in my opinion.  If I want to throw in my two cents and see arguments against my SPECIFIC stances and not that of others, I can go ahead and do that.  If you don't like it, feel free not to read it and concern your "greater mind" with other topics that are more appropriate for geniuses such as yourself. 

When I referred to greater minds than yours, I was talking about Cady. Now who's making assumptions? Oh ho ho, really turned the tables on you there, di'nt I, woo hoo, et cetera. Dumbass.

And thanks for taking it for granted that the aim of any given thread should be to make you learn by challenging your asinine and, as J said, frankly racist "arguments." Extremely accommodating of you, that. I could concede that a thread that YOU start about YOUR asinine "argument" should be for that purpose. I even suggested that you start your own thread, since there is a whole board about AA beyond this one thread, and your specific interest might be better served by a new thread. In any event, this thread is not the one for your post. Start a new thread. 

Why the namecalling?  How old are we?

How is wanting to have my beliefs challenged accomodating for me?  I would think it is the opposite.....

So what is another explanation for the staggering level of violent crime and chronic underachievement amongst black males?  If it is completely unrelated to culture, then what is it?  You can cry poverty or racism all you want, and those factors undoubtedly contribute, but there are myriad examples of people being able to get out of those situations and live a successful life.  There has to be another factor involved, if it is not culture then what is it? 

"Wide spread popularity beyond the general demographic."  As a pro-AA type asserted earlier, part of the reason for AA is to provide good role models to black youth.  If these good role models are lacking or pushed to the side by figures glorifying drug use and violence, is it really such a stretch to think that rappers could take that place?  Combine this with the lack of father figures and I do not think it is implausible that such a thing could happen. Hence an explanation for why this type of *&^% can have a greater impact on black youth than the rest of society as a whole. 

I really think it is unarguable that the most popular rappers are typically advocating a gangster lifestyle.  Fiddy Cent "get rich or die trying", tupac with a tattoo of thug life across his chest, Dre rapping about shooting people while "f-ing bitches", etc. etc.  All these advocate a negative lifestyle.  And the bit about casual sex is important.  Degrading women and advocating arbitrary, unmeaningful sexual relationships can hardly be considered positive, particularly in a societal group with such a major problem pertaining to father figures. I am not saying that these kinds of things are not prevalent in other forms of music, but when these people are placed in situations as role models, its a problem.  These few examples do not prove that rap is universally negative any more than those few examples prove that rap is universally positive, but there is undoubtedly a seedy and violent element in rap music that could easily have an effect on a young person's psyche. 

This is probably pretty disjointed and rambling, but whatever. 

Quick addition.  If thinking that cultural issues could play a factor in the violent nature of black communities is racist, than I guess Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson, Bill Cosby, etc. are all racist against blacks as well, right?  All of these leaders in the black community have spoken strongly of the negatives of rap music and gangster culture on the black community.  I wonder why they hate black people?  Weird......



7
I don't understand the hostility here. Jesus. 

What assumptions are flawed?  The part about rap music glorifying gang violence and drug use?  If it is flawed, please show me how.  I am not here to prove a point or prove I am better than anyone.  That is not the point of debate.  If you think I am so ignorant, ENLIGHTEN ME.

I think I put together a pretty coherent argument backed up by specific examples and data.  My only assumption is that black people listen to mainstream hip hop, which tends to glorify gang life.  The rest of my premises were backed up by specifics.

Am I mistaken in believing black youth listen to popular hip hop?

I wasn't trying to prove I am better than anyone, much less dashrashi.  I don't care about promoting myself above others or any of that *&^%.  I'll leave that kind of *&^% in elementary school where it belongs. 

8
You're not saying anything new, dumbshit. That's what everyone meant when they told you to read the f-ing thread. I assure you, it's been hashed out by greater minds than yours. Well and truly.

Now kindly piss off. Or start your own thread.

Wow.  That is a lot of arrogance and a lot of anger.  Why would you automatically assume you are so superior to me?  Seems unfounded and not particularly logical.   

I read the thread.  You're going to have to show me where the RSF and Fryer were brought up, because I couldn't find it......

Edit: you learn alot more from having specific beliefs challenged then reading an ongoing dialogue between others, in my opinion.  If I want to throw in my two cents and see arguments against my SPECIFIC stances and not that of others, I can go ahead and do that.  If you don't like it, feel free not to read it and concern your "greater mind" with other topics that are more appropriate for geniuses such as yourself. 

9
I didn't want to work my way through 60 pages on this bad boy, but has anyone else brought up issues outside of whitey keeping the black population down?

i.e. 70% of black babies being born into single parent families currently?  Or a culture that promotes gang violence and drugs?  Or a culture in which those that study hard to improve themselves are socially ostracized or labelled as "uncle toms"? 

Or that maybe AA isn't the way to go and we should focus on raising the bar for education in inner-city schools.  Distributing the same level of funding to rich and poor areas as opposed to the current system is a step in the right direction, and it brings everyone up, not just URMs.

There are other, far more pragmatic ways to address this issue than throwing people into the deep end and expecting them to swim. 


Maybe you should've just read through those 60 pages.

HTFH.


I believe that when people say things about "black culture" they simply state what the media shows them.  Does all of "black music" glorify gang violence, sex, and drugs...no.  If you would take the time to actually purchase different forms of hip hop music you will see that artists such as Talib Kweli, Common, Mos Def, Immortal Technique, Lupe Fiasco, and Black Milk among others stresses to uplift the cultural and glorifies things such as education and political awareness.  Secondly, do some people name those that try to better themselves through education "uncle toms"...yes.  However, a vast majority of African Americans that I know from the inner-city and suburbs applaud the fact that I am attending law school.   Also, on the flip side of that I have had Caucasian "friends" of mine say to me that I was not really black because of the value I placed on education, so it works both ways.  I have lived half my life in the inner city and half in the suburbs and I can tell you that people in general white, black, asian, hispanic etc. basically all want the same things in life.  It's just the reality that these different races and classes have on being able to capture the "American Dream" is what differentiates there outlook on society.  Lastly, Affirmative Action has in some ways helped out white woman more than any other group in America.  However, I do not see nearly the uproar, although there should not be one IMHO, that I do when it pertains to African Americans.  All you have to do is look at television anchors before and after Affirmative Action to see the progress that they have made. 

Common and Talib are both sick.  Immortal.....meh.  The song about raping and murdering his mother doesn't do much for me personally, though it definitely could not be considered glorifying gang culture.  I am referring to the more mainstream "gangsta" rap that DOES glorify violence and gang life.  I could be wrong in thinking that it is likely many black people listen to this music, but that seems slightly counterintuitive. 

Those whites who said you weren't acting black enough.....pretty screwed up.  Shove it back in their face by kicking ass and taking names in LS. 

I am glad you have found support from your community, but according to most studies this is not always the case.  Roland Fryer, a former gang member/drug dealer from a predominantly black, poor neighborhood, performed a very interesting study on this matter.  His results: "...found that for white pupils, the higher their grades, the more popular they were.  But blacks with good grades had fewer black friends than their mediocre peers.  In other words, studiousness is stigmatised among black schoolchildren.  It would be hard to imagine a more crippling cultural norm."  This is what I am talking about when I refer to cultural issues adding to the underperformance of many young black people, particularly males.  Factor this in with the lack of role models caused by the flight of so many fathers in the black community and the odds are stacked against black youth from the beggining.  Combine this with systematic racism in the past preventing accumulation of wealth and a history of success, and it is even further compounded.  IMHO the best way to attack these issues on a macro level is some combination of increased funding for inner city schools and diversity being taken into account as a factor in college admissions.  Diversity of experience expressed through a PS or another avenue should be considered, as opposed to a rubber stamp of diversity for certain racial and ethnic groups, which completely ignores the possibility of wealthy URMs from suburban areas exploiting a system meant to help the disadvantaged.  In my mind, URM and having a diverse background are not synonomous.

On the micro level, something has to be done to combat the stigma associated with successfull black students.  People, like yourself, who work to bring themselves out of a bad situation should be commended and respected, not put down or ostracized.  Additionally, I think that maintaining strong familial ties and a united, two-parent nuclear family is vital as well.  If young black males do not have a good role model at home then that spot could be filled by innapropriate sources, i.e. older males with gang involvement or mass media stars. 

Programs like the Renaissance School Fund in Chicago that increase funding for certain inner city schools based on potential for success in implementation of college prep programs are proving extremely successful.  This is due in part to increased funds and partly because programs like this remove the stigma surrounding success in education-everyone at the program is focused on college and being succesfull academically.  Systems, like this one, that raise the bar for black students in primary education set them up for success later, as opposed to giving inner-city students a subpar education up until they are 18 and then accepting them to excel once they get into a college via AA. 

10

Actually primary education programs meant to help black youth are springing up across the country with resounding success, though they are limited in scope by lack of funds.  Progress is being made, and, IMHO, it is not through AA. 

You'll see it everywhere.

Could you clarify?  See what?

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