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Messages - nowayman

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1
General board for soon-to-be 1Ls / Re: 1L year: Tell all here
« on: December 30, 2006, 03:38:58 AM »
While reading "One L," it helps to keep this phrase in mind: "wow, this guy is a paranoid loser."


2
Law School Applications / Re: Chance at UCLA/Berkeley?
« on: June 06, 2006, 07:23:06 AM »
If you have California residency, you will have a very good shot at Boalt.

3
Michigan.  At full price this really isn't a hard decision to make, in my opinion.  But in reality it is, isn't it?  Packing up your entire life and moving the entire length of the United States is hard.  (Hey I'm actually speaking from experience for once, yay me).  I just went through virtually the same experience you are describing.

I had to pick between UT v. UM, I'm also in a serious relationship and I want to work in Texas after I graduate.  To make things worse, Ut is probably a better school than UM for Texas (I don't think any schools outside Harvard and maybe yale place better in Texas, excluding the very largest firms- which, frankly, are usually extensions of other non-Texas firms). 

I chose UM.  Why?  Lots of reasons.  But I'll give you one, a very large one, that might actually help in your situation. 

I chose UM because I wanted to know if  my girlfriend is the one for me.  I figure that if I love her enough to not have doubts about her (or myself) and that we are still together in a year, I'm going to marry her. 

I think this physical seperation will prove my feelings one way or another.  And either way it goes it will be for the best.  If we survive a long distance relationship it was meant to be.  If not, it was not.  We shall see.  (Or rather, I shall see).

Anyways, I hope that helps.  If you need clarification or just someone to bounce ideas off of, feel free to instant message me.

Edit: I ruled Cornell out because you want to work in LA.  You could get a job in LA from Cornell but I believe UM would place better there.  If you really really want a small class size, you should consider Cornell.


4
Here's a word of advice to the incoming 01 (IVE HAD A WHOLE TWO DAYS OF UM LS SCHOOLING SO BOW BEFORE THE INFINITE KNOWLEDGE THAT IS ME).

For your pass/fail writing course, do the "writing and analysis of law" reading after you have done absolutely everything else, including non-ls related stuff. :P

The sad part is that the wal book is probably the most interesting/and most helpful of the entire lot.

Maybe I'm misunderstanding your advice (since I won't have had my first two days of LS schooling for months), but I usually hear that research and writing are the most useful things you will learn in law school and that, since most students tend to ignore the class due to its pass/fail grading, studying these subjects arduously will set you apart during your summers.  Is it merely the pass/fail designation that makes you think that the reading can be postponed, or is there something about the nature of the reading that makes it unsuitable for being the first reading of the night?

Nope, you aren't misunderstanding me.  I honestly feel the same way about legal practice (writing).  I was going to include in my orginal post a line about how the book even seemed the most helpful (I've worked as a legal assistant at a small firm and it covers very pertinent material) and entertaining. 

To clarify, my advice was to not get so absorbed in it that you lose sight of the big picture and end up freaking out about the work load.  From Friday to Sunday, I've actually spent 23 full hours(hours w/o interruption, distractions, or anything but very focused reading) on the first day assignments of my three classes.

This isn't because I'm reading cases, either.  I'm actually fairly fast at reading them because of my prior work experience.  It's just a lot of stuff to digest (and to be fair I'm making sure I understand the material instead of just straight reading).

Edit:
Now that I think about it I'd like to mention that my original post (with this added) is geared towards people who realize the importance of the class.  Not many other people are going to spend as much time as they could (should) on Legal Writing.


5
IT'S NOT A PIZZA UNTIL AFTER IT COMES OUT OF THE OVEN.

6
Here's a word of advice to the incoming 01 (IVE HAD A WHOLE TWO DAYS OF UM LS SCHOOLING SO BOW BEFORE THE INFINITE KNOWLEDGE THAT IS ME).

For your pass/fail writing course, do the "writing and analysis of law" reading after you have done absolutely everything else, including non-ls related stuff. :P

The sad part is that the wal book is probably the most interesting/and most helpful of the entire lot.

7
I considered a JD/MD degree.  I wanted to do expert testimony in med mal cases, after working on an appellate brief involving one.  The information being presented was interesting and it looked like something I would enjoy.

The more research I did on it, though, the less I liked it.  A poster on page one mentioned this but it's worth repeating.  These expert witnesses are burning bridges.  Testifying against another doctor is one of the most frowned upon items in the med community.  The reason being (a laymen's interpretation) that doctors do not want to be told how to treat patients.  Not by a pharmacutical company, not by a lawyer, and not by a judge.  Every successful lawsuit against a doctor sets precedents, both legal and social.  These, in turn, create more suits and drive up med mal costs and lower willingness to take risk (which is needed to save lives).

I guess I started thinking about all of this after I was directly told by someone with a JD/MD that a JD/MD is a waste of time and money.  You should either do one or the other and that most people who have a JD/MD have it solely because they've made a career change.

Anyways, I just figured I'd add my two cents because you are asking for advice from people who considered it.  Take it for what its worth, which isn't all that much considering I have neither a JD nor a MD.

8
Michigan over Georgetown, NU and Texas.

Hard call for me.  It really came down to UM versus Texas for two reasons: 1) I didn't want to live in a city.  I have two very large dogs and simply didn't want to deal with a city apartment. and 2) I want to work/live in Texas.

I ended up choosing UM despite UT placing better in Texas and the huge alumni network that UT would provide for Texas for one reason.  I simply wanted to keep my options open.  I'm young.  Maybe I'll fall in love with another city.

Fwiw, I realize a Texas degree can travel.  It just doesn't do so as easilily as one from UM.

Edit: Both schools gave me a half tuition scholarship.  It seemed that UM wanted me more and that also played a role in me choosing Michigan.

9
General Off-Topic Board / Re: Do You Believe in God?
« on: May 08, 2006, 08:28:31 AM »
would those of you that believe in god still belive if your parents hadnt raised you/brainwashed you with it?

My parents are atheists.

10
General Off-Topic Board / Re: Do You Believe in God?
« on: May 08, 2006, 08:23:01 AM »
Yes for God. 

I, however, have very serious problems with organized religion, especially some sects of Christianity.  So, no for religion.

Strange that my SO is the daughter of a preacher...

Anyways, God as revealed through logic and not blind faith (nothing wrong with faith though).

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