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Messages - amityjo

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1
General Board / Re: Where to put luggage during callbacks?
« on: August 31, 2007, 01:42:42 PM »
But clearly not too prestigious to spell correctly. God help whatever firm you end up working for.

Hypocrite much?

Quote from: amityjo on 8/29/07
As an older law student attendint a Tier 3 law school . . .

Quote from: amityjo on 1/19/07
My husband and I have made a LOT of sacrafices for this . . .

Quote from: amityjo on 11/24/06
I beat myself for that five years for having dropped out, having not talked to anyone at the school to see if I could get help, and having acted rashly without looking at the root of concerm.

This is why spell checker was invented.

Sweetie, I never claimed to be "to prestigous".

2
General Board / Re: Where to put luggage during callbacks?
« on: August 29, 2007, 02:35:44 PM »

Quote from: Raven
Please go back to autoadmit.

I am to prestigous for that site. ::)

But clearly not too prestigious to spell correctly. God help whatever firm you end up working for.

3
General Board / Re: is law a good career to get into?
« on: August 29, 2007, 02:29:49 PM »
Quote
And contrary to the poster that said it is next to impossible to get a BigLaw job out of a non-T14 school . . . he doesn't know what he's talking about. I will acknowledge that it is considerably more difficult, but to say it is impossible is a gross overstatement.

How many attorneys from tier 3 or tier 4 are hired into V20 firms each year?  Half a dozen?  You're guaranteed BIGLAW from a t14 if you're in the top three-quarters.  Even the bottom quarter has a lot of success landing jobs.  But at a tier 3/tier 4 school?  Maybe the top one or two students have a legitimate shot. 

First of all, if your definition of BigLaw is only V20 firms, then you and I (and you and most law students) have two different definitions of BigLaw. When I refer to BigLaw, I mean any of the firms paying top salaries in their respective markets (in NY, for example, any firm paying $160K per year before bonus.) There are many firms that pay those rates outside of the V20. If we are speaking strictly about the V20, I would generally agree with you but for the fact that eleven people from my school alone ended up in the V20. I cannot speak for other schools. 

Secondly, to say that being in T14 school ALONE guarantees you access to the V20 is absurd. I have quite a few friends from T14 schools who did interview, but did not get offers, at V20 firms, although they all do work for my definition of a BigLaw firm. Is it easier for my T14 friends. Certainly; it is quite a bit easier for them. But does this mean it is impossible to get one of the BigLaw (not necessarily V20) jobs coming from a T3 or T4 school? Absolutely not, but you better be in the top 10-15% of your class.

4
General Board / Re: is law a good career to get into?
« on: August 29, 2007, 12:37:29 PM »
As someone who once held a job for a decade because I was too afraid to do something else with a pay cut, I concur completely with LawDaddy. As an older law student attendint a Tier 3 law school (by choice and necessity due to financial and geographic considerations), I also agree with LawDaddy about his observations regarding the legal field. And contrary to the poster that said it is next to impossible to get a BigLaw job out of a non-T14 school . . . he doesn't know what he's talking about. I will acknowledge that it is considerably more difficult, but to say it is impossible is a gross overstatement.

Further, there is so much more to the field of law than working BigLaw. There are mid and small-sized firms. There is the D.A.'s office. There are countless non-profit and government opportunities. The key is that when you apply to law school, you MUST realistically consider 1) the financial burden you are taking on, and 2) the realities of the schools' placement record, to determine whether or not you can pay back your financial obligations somewhat comfortably. This means that you must not take the schools' career services departments' claims and statistics for placement at face value; you must do your homework, research, and speak with ACTUAL graduates of the programs you have been accepted to. You must also consider the possibility of taking a lower ranked school if it offers you a significant scholarship (which was my choice.) For example, if you think your passion may be working for the D.A.'s office, you must accept the fact that even with a loan forgiveness program offered by your school, you will not be able to really afford to pay back the loans you have (minimum of $80,000) on the salary. What are the options then? You go to a Tier 3 or 4 with a good regional reputation, with a 50%-or-more scholarship (if you get one) where you end up with $50,000 or less in loans after graduation, and work your tail off in school to get in the top 25% of your class.

One other piece of advice - I HIGHLY recommend taking a couple of years, at least, between college and law school to get some real-world experience. Most of the top students in my program are older students, and I believe that it is because they have 1) the ability to treat law school like a job and be efficient in their work, and 2)  practical adult experience needed to understand some legal concepts that a young person cannot yet appreciate. Not saying that's true for every young student, but it's hardly a rash generalization.

5
Hi all. I'm a 3L, and I just wrapped up my summer with a firm, which offered me full time employment after graduation, as well as the opportunity to be a law clerk for them during the school year. I'm working three days a week for them. My question is to those of you who have done this: in your experience, what is the difference between being a summer associate and a law clerk? For what it's worth, this firm gave me a real work load over the summer, so maybe being a law clerk won't be much different. I'm just trying to figure out what to expect. Thanks for your input!

6
General Board / Re: What happens if I quit my 1L job
« on: June 09, 2007, 04:58:59 PM »
This is one of the most idiotic posts I've seen on this message board.

1) If you "hate" this job, one where you are actually one of the few 1L students who get to do substantive legal work, I would question whether you really want to be a lawyer.
2) You just want to "relax" this summer? You sound like you're still in an undergrad mentality - knock it off. You're in law school, and to get even non-big law jobs, there's a lot of competition (especially coming out of a non-top tier school). Suck it up and start realizing that you have to make yourself as marketable as possible.
3) You decided to take a course and work at the same time. Consider it training for your 2L year, because 2L is a female dog. If you're on journal, you're going to have to get used to working as hard as you are right now.
4) You're getting paid. Most 1Ls don't get paid their first summer, so consider yourself lucky and stop bitching.

Good thing your not afraid of heights, with your pedestal being so high and all...

No pedestal - just intolerant of whiney, lazy idiots.

7
General Board / Re: What happens if I quit my 1L job
« on: June 09, 2007, 10:01:49 AM »
This is one of the most idiotic posts I've seen on this message board.

1) If you "hate" this job, one where you are actually one of the few 1L students who get to do substantive legal work, I would question whether you really want to be a lawyer.
2) You just want to "relax" this summer? You sound like you're still in an undergrad mentality - knock it off. You're in law school, and to get even non-big law jobs, there's a lot of competition (especially coming out of a non-top tier school). Suck it up and start realizing that you have to make yourself as marketable as possible.
3) You decided to take a course and work at the same time. Consider it training for your 2L year, because 2L is a female dog. If you're on journal, you're going to have to get used to working as hard as you are right now.
4) You're getting paid. Most 1Ls don't get paid their first summer, so consider yourself lucky and stop bitching.

8
St. John's U Law School / Re: Hofstra v St. John's
« on: June 09, 2007, 12:39:31 AM »
I currently attend Hofstra and am going into my third year. I have enjoyed my time there, and would not have made a different choice. I have had many wonderful professors, and have a great summer associate job. Is my experience different than many Hofstra law school students? Perhaps. I am fortunate enough to have had decent grades and be on Law Review. Most of my classmates are doing just fine, even though they're not in a large law firm. Quoting my cousin, who is a major partner at a major law firm, "Outside of the top tier, it doesn't matter where you go to law school - just kick ass no matter where you're at." 

As far as the GPA for maintaining a scholarship, it is now a 3.25. When I got my scholarship, it was a 3.0. But with the new forced curve being roughly a 3.1, it's not too bad to maintain.

9
General Board / Re: Getting a CPA license after law school
« on: May 15, 2007, 05:18:27 PM »
My tax attorney is also a CPA. He's handled all of the corporate organization and tax issues for the business my husband and I own. Because we're an LLC, he's also done all of our personal taxes as well. He  literally has hundreds of clients, and is solo practitioner, and is cleaning up because he is full service. So based on my own limited experience, it appears to have worked out well for at least one lawyer. :-)

10
General Board / Re: Where do the bottom 10% class rank end up?
« on: May 12, 2007, 09:30:18 AM »
Jalum, I read your post and had to respond. I have a friend who is not only in the bottom 10% of her class, but the bottom 1%. She just finished her second year with a 2.09. She has been on academic probation for a year and also lost a scholarship at the end of her first year. She has no intention of quiting school - she told me that the administration would need to use a crow bar to get her out of the school.

The differences between her and you are this:
1) She networks like a mad woman - she has a summer associate position paying her double the weekly salary than most people I know who are at the 50th percentile of her class. How did she get it? She got a list of all of the mid size and solo practitioners who graduated from her school, and called them, told them exactly what her deal was academically and asked their opinions of how she could use her degree even if she graduated with a poor gpa. Five or six of these firms liked her style, the fact that she was ballsy enough to admit her rank and reach out, and offered her an opportunity to interview. She was offered positions at every one of the firms. In other words, because she reached out, she got a job, and a good one at that.

2) She really loves the law, and refuses to be defined by her grades. She truly enjoys the material, even if she sucks at taking tests.

3) She doesn't resent the process. She just acknowledges that there is a disconnect between the Socratic Method and her learning style, and she's doing what she can to get better.

Take that for what it's worth - if you have bad grades, you have to make up for it in another way. Use your past work experience, any networking skills you have, etc. to make yourself more marketable. But I think the key difference here is whether you like the law enough to take the chance. My buddy does - she can't imagine doing anything else with her life, so she's digging in her heels. Will you do the same?

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