Law School Discussion

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Messages - dcbargirl

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1
General Board / Re: practicing law abroad...possible??
« on: October 07, 2005, 09:32:30 AM »
I only know of one firm that lets a significant portion of its junior associates work in its offices abroad. Many firms with international offices hire European attorneys, although they may let you split your summer abroad and trick you into thinking you may be able work abroad. You can go to a firm's website and look at the bios of the attorneys in international offices and see whether they have US JDs. You could always do JAG if you want to be abroad.

2
The OP said they wanted to do transactional law, not litigate and the government doesn't do transactional law. And in house positions are pretty impossible to get without firm experience.

3
What exactly is international business law? Representing international companies? You do that when you're a corporate associate at any major firm and it's not called international business law. Is it working abroad for companies? Legal fields that affect companies that transact business abroad, like international trade law?

4
Good luck finding a firm that lets you do transactional work 9-5. It will be pretty tough to find someplace that will let you get away with billing 1500-1600 hours a year.

5
Law Firms / Re: Securities Law Background
« on: October 05, 2005, 03:37:00 PM »
Background is totally irrelevant. None of the securities lawyers I know at the biglaw firm I work at have business degrees. None of them even took securities in law school. You learn what you need to know as an associate.

6
Law Firms / Re: Regional disparities between schools and jobs?
« on: October 05, 2005, 03:35:13 PM »
There is a regional disparity depending on how well regarded your school is. It's probably easier to switch coasts having attending a top 14 like Cornell than it is to switch coasts from a regional school like USC. Either way, you'll still need a story explaining your desire to be on the opposite coast. Firms don't want to waste spending time money on callbacks and having you as a summer and then have you decide to stay on the coast of your school.

7
Law Firms / Re: course selection
« on: October 05, 2005, 03:32:34 PM »
I don't think taking a bunch of bar classes makes any difference, you're certainly not going to remember the black letter from 2 years ago when you're studying for the bar and you don't need to, everyone takes barbri. Take some or all of the basics - evidence, corporations, criminal law/procedure, tax, constitutional law II, and then take things you are interested in. You can learn family law when you're studying for barbri, but you'll likely never have the opportunity to learn Islamic law, literature and the law, film first amendment law, law and national security, history of jurisprudence, animal law, etc again. 

I know plenty of people who didn't take more than 1 or 2 bar classes and got biglaw jobs, clerkships, and passed the bar.

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