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Topics - Barnum

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Black Law Student Discussion Board / CLEO Event in DC this Saturday
« on: March 09, 2011, 08:57:02 AM »
Hey everyone,

Just thought I'd post a link for a CLEO event this Saturday held at Catholic Law School in case anyone is interested.

The CLEO website is http://www.cleoscholars.com

They have other events throughout the year in other major cities, but I know the one this Saturday has a free practice LSAT with a follow up 2 hours LSAT strategy session.

Also, for some of the posters who are much earlier in the process, there are also seminars for Freshman and Sophomores to get their feet wet with an introduction to logical reasoning.

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Studying for the LSAT / DC LSAT forum this Saturday
« on: March 08, 2011, 06:01:32 PM »
Hey everyone,

Just thought I'd post a link for a CLEO event this Saturday held at Catholic Law School in case anyone is interested.

The CLEO website is http://www.cleoscholars.com

They have other events throughout the year in other major cities, but I know the one this Saturday has a free practice LSAT with a follow up 2 hours LSAT strategy session.

Also, for some of the posters who are much earlier in the process, there are also seminars for Freshman and Sophomores to get their feet wet with an introduction to logical reasoning.

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Studying for the LSAT / Free extra help in Washington, DC
« on: June 12, 2009, 03:10:09 PM »
Hi Everybody!

On Monday, we're going to be at local Washington DC coffee shops answering LSAT, GMAT, and GRE questions.  Bring homework questions, general questions, or just come hang out with us while we get our caffeine fix.  This is a great chance to support the local coffee shops and the local economy while getting questions answered!  If you have any friends that are thinking about law school, business school, or grad school, please pass this info along to them as well!

Here are the locations and times. 

M.E. Swing with Jeff (Barnum on this board) 2-5:30, 1702 G Street N.W.,  http://www.swingscoffee.com/ (Between 17th and 18th street near the White House and World Bank)

Java Green with Bernie (She actually posts as Bernie) 2-8pm, 1020 19th St, N.W., http://www.javagreencafe.com/  (Between K and L, with a VERY yummy vegetarian menu!)

Java House with Jeff 6-9pm, 1645 Q St NW, http://www.javahousedc.com/  (Just down the street from Dupont Circle)

Hope to see you there!

If you have any questions, please feel free to email me directly at jglazer@griffonprep,com

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Studying for the LSAT / DC Area Minority Pre-Law Conf.
« on: February 13, 2007, 09:39:59 AM »
This weekend, the Virginia State Bar Association is hosting a Pre-law conference for minority candidates.

The event begins on Friday with a free practice LSAT for those that can make it that day, and the main conference is Saturday with a full schedule of events and speakers including two events on how to study for the LSAT.  Registration is free and lunch on Saturday is included.

The event will be held at the George Mason Law School near Arlington, VA.

If you would like information on how to register, PM me your email address, and I can send you the registration form.

This will be a nice small conference with admissions officers from some DC and VA schools.  It will be a great chance to meet and greet and make yourself memorable.  I know many applicants who want admissions committees to realize they are more than two numbers, and this would be a great opportunity to show them that this is true.

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Minority Topics / DC Area Minority Pre-Law Conf.
« on: February 13, 2007, 09:38:32 AM »
This weekend, the Virginia State Bar Association is hosting a Pre-law conference for minority candidates.

The event begins on Friday with a free practice LSAT for those that can make it that day, and the main conference is Saturday with a full schedule of events and speakers.  Registration is free and lunch on Saturday is included.

The event will be held at the George Mason Law School near Arlington, VA.

If you would like information on how to register, PM me your email address, and I can send you the registration form.

This will be a nice small conference with admissions officers from some DC and VA schools.  It will be a great chance to meet and greet and make yourself memorable.  I know many applicants who want admissions committees to realize they are more than two numbers, and this would be a great opportunity to show them that this is true.

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Studying for the LSAT / Time is not really the issue
« on: August 14, 2005, 07:51:48 AM »
It seems a lot of people just recently took their second diagnostic, and are now thinking, "if it just weren't for that time..."  Granted they keep saying that right after they complain that they messed up and spend longer than they should have on a game or a reading comp passage. I just want to make sure people realize then time was not the problem, but how you lost it when you weren't sure what to do was the problem.  I posted this before but I thought I would copy it down again, just to remind people that in my six years of teaching, I have never really met a student where time was really their problem.

Although simple familiarity from taking test after test after test will make you feel like you can go faster, I think most people need to understand that running short on time is an effect not a cause.  Because test takers don't understand the test as well as they could, they take longer on problems thereby causing them to run short on time.  If you understand what you are doing you will by default go faster.  Focus on learning how to get the problems correct and your pace will automatically pick up.  You often hear people say they took a prep course and their score went down, but then they studied longer and their score shot up.  This is because the LSAT is like anything else we learn.  For example typing, when I was younger I used the good ol' hunt and peck method with two fingers, and even got pretty fast that way.  Eventually I decided i really should learn the correct way to type using all my fingers.  In the beginning don't only did I start typing more slowly, but also made alot more errors in my typing.  But with practice and forcing myself to do it the right way, I have become a much better typist now than I ever was with hunt and peck.  LSAT is no different when you start studying you may slow down at first, might even make a few more errors.  That doesn't mean abandon these strategies, it means keep working and you will get more accurate and ultimately faster.

Also if you are just more accurate you could surely improve your score.  If all someone answered were 2 games, two reading comp passages, and all of about 15 Logical Reasoning questions in a section and because they took nearly twice as long on everything as the person who tries to just finish hopefully manage to be more accurate you would score about a 152.  Not this is the most impressive score, but realize that is with doing only half the test.  If you can do 3 games 3 passages and about 19 LR questions per section you are up to a 162 which puts many people well above their goal.  Again this means only completing about 75% of the test.

Also by the way people who usually try to just go faster end up going so fast they barely pay attention and end up having to reread so many times that it ultimately slows them down.  Often I tell students one of the best ways to go faster is to take your time.  In fact one of the drills I do with them I give them a full section of LR and tell them just to worry about getting everything they answer correct and that I am not timing them.  After 35 minutes I tell them to stop.  Most students not only find that their accuracy improved, but also think I gave them an extra ten minutes because of how much further they get then normal.

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Since this gets posted so often with very strong answers one way or the other, I thought I would try to give my 2 cents on the issue.

Studying for the LSAT can be like learning any other skill.  The best analogy I think I can give for the difference between self preparation and a prep course(I seem to like analogies in my posts)is like learning the piano.  You can buy books and work really hard and eventually teach yourself what you need to know to play or you can pay someone who already knows how to teach you.

This seems to be the same thing here.  Either way you might eventually learn to play Bach (sorry for the reference to Feb 05), but having a teacher show you how can often be significantly more efficient.  It will also differ greatly based on what skills you bring to the table beforehand.  I taught myself how to play piano (still can't play Bach quite yet), but I knew how to read music because I already played other instruments.  Man it would have sucked to try to learn with no understanding of music at all.  Same goes with the LSAT.  If your first test is truly in the 160s (I say truly because at home self tests do not seem to be indicative of actual test performance I noticed after reading many posts on this board), then you might have enough innate understanding of the LSAT logic to work on your own and boost your score.  It still might be more efficient with an instructor but then you have to make a decision about your time versus your money.  However, if your first score is in the 140s you may find that all the self study in the world won't show a score improvement because you are not really sure what you are doing wrong or how to fix it.

So my basic recommendation is to take a full test before you make a decision and see where you stand.  When you take this test, make sure to very strictly time yourself, add in an experimental section from another exam, and do it all at one sitting.  Then you can make a more informed decision based on where you are starting, where you want to end up, and what the best course of action would be.  Remember a $1200 course may seem expensive, but it you need it to boost your score than just think of it as an investment in your future.

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