Law School Discussion

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Topics - Steady Ascent

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Studying for the LSAT / Sequencing Logic Games w/ Conditional Rules
« on: November 26, 2007, 08:01:25 PM »
Has anyone noticed how relatively often this type of game is being tested in recent tests? This has represented a significant hurdle for me, because I'm very slow at working through this game type. The real issue is simply the conditional rules in a sequential format. I dominate normal linear sequencing games (they're commonly thought to be the easiest type) and conditional rules within other types of games, but I'm so slow with the conditional rules in the sequence format.

I've been trying to come up with a solid system for attacking this type, but it's been difficult. One thing I've found somewhat helpful has been taking the contrapositive of the conditional rules. I almost always do this with other games, but I routinely skipped it with this type of game (not sure why).

Are there any other tips from my LSAT colleagues?

Also, is there a webpage where the games are broken up by PT into specific game categories? I really need to find more sequencing games with conditional rules!

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Law School Applications / Diversity Statements: Physical Handicaps
« on: September 24, 2007, 09:37:15 AM »
Are diversity statements traditionally limited to ethnicity, or is it acceptable to write a diversity statement based on a significant handicap? I contemplated including it in my personal statement, but I ultimately decided against doing so because I didn't want to convolute the theme.

Would it be inappropriate to include a DS with such a topic?

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Law School Applications / Resume Rough Draft
« on: September 21, 2007, 07:36:27 PM »
Would anyone be so kind as to give my resume a look-over and comment on its deficiencies and strengths? I feel my resume is a weak area of my application, and I would really appreciate feedback.

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Law School Applications / Seeking Solid Functional Resume Format
« on: September 09, 2007, 11:44:17 PM »
I am horrible when it comes to formatting my resume. I actually used the MS format for years, but now I realize how bland and generic those are. Could anyone please recommend a site or even a program that provides strong functional resume formats and/or templates?

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Personal Statement / First Rough Draft of PS: Seeking Critical Reviewers
« on: September 09, 2007, 10:14:24 PM »
I'm willing to reciprocate.

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Law School Applications / LSAT College Mean & Mean College GPA
« on: September 07, 2007, 08:40:53 PM »
I went to a comparatively "weak" UG. Our mean college GPA is 3.24 and our LSAT college mean is 147. Looking over these numbers, I've become nervous. How big of a role do these figures play in the application process? Am I going to be penalized because others at my college have averaged 147 on the LSAT? If I get a high LSAT, such as a 170, will this offset my college's mean? I suppose I don't understand the significance of these two numbers. Any information would be appreciated.


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Law School Applications / GPA Trend
« on: September 07, 2007, 08:16:33 PM »
I don't have much experience with evaluating/judging GPA trends, so I'm not sure whether my own GPA trend is good, bad, or neutral.

My UG lasted five years. My GPAs for -each- of those five years, from first to fifth, were 4.0, 3.80, 3.33, 3.82, and 3.87. The cumulative GPA trend for the same years was 4.0, 3.89, 3.78, 3.79, and 3.81.

Should I be concerned about anything here?

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LSAC and LSDAS / LSDAS GPA
« on: September 07, 2007, 08:06:01 PM »
What exactly is this? Is it just the compiled GPA reported after they receive your transcripts? Or is it weighted according to your UG school?

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Personal Statement / Personal Statements: Too Personal?
« on: September 07, 2007, 04:38:43 AM »
I am finding it difficult to write my personal statement. Give me a question regarding history, and I'll put forward a thesis and defend it with solid research and cogent writing. However, the PS seems to be a completely different beast in that it's, well, personal. I lean heavily toward privacy, but I realize that in order to craft a truly personalized statement I must open up and share myself with the audience. This has been notably challenging for me.

In some respects, I do have an interesting story to tell. For instance, I was born with a birth defect that presented--and continues to present--social difficulties for me, many of which I have since overcome, but some of which continue to tax me. The ongoing struggle with this issue, however, is not what I wish to express. Rather, I wish to convey how my circumstances and challenges have helped to shape the character I have today. I do feel we are, in many respects, a product of our experiences. I know that my struggles with my birth defect have undeniably had an effect on my life, as well as on my decision to enter law. But I cannot help feel as if it's somehow manipulative to include this, as if I am using this inherent obstacle as a vehicle for entrance into law school.

As if this weren't enough, another dramatic circumstance poses difficulty in presenting: the death of my teenage brother. Normally, I would think it inappropriate to include the death of others in a personal statement. What's the relevance? I have looked inward frequently as of late, however, and I wonder whether the circumstances of his death did not shape my sense of justice and my pursuit of law as a career.

My brother died en route to another hospital, after the original hospital neglected to treat his medical emergency. My parents successfully pursued a settlement with the hospital for neglecting to provide proper care to my brother. The death traumatized my family, as I'm sure many other families have experienced grief after losing loved ones. The circumstances of my brother's death and the resulting lawsuit, though, lent to me a certain understanding of how we pursue justice in this nation.

Furthermore, it taught me what grave consequences exist for the gross negligence of life--both in the emotional pain experienced by those who have lost and by those who are financially penalized for their negligence. That such a painful loss can be filtered through the relative civility of our legal system has given me a great admiration for law, and has imbued me with a sense of duty in maintaining its integrity. On the cusp of entering law school, I am already self-assured in my choice of health law as a professional focus, and I attribute this confidence largely to what occurred in the above lines.

Should I include these indelible but dramatic impressions?

Now that I am in the process of writing my PS, this remains a burning question. Have any others felt this way? I realize this may be an awkward post to respond to, but I'd appreciate insights, views, and recommendations.

Thank you for reading.

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