Law School Discussion

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Topics - JimmyO

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Non-Traditional Students / Debt Level Going In
« on: November 14, 2007, 04:56:45 PM »
OK, so like a lot of other Americans, my wife and I have managed to get ourselves into a consumer debt (read: credit card) pickle.

We're on a strict budget though, and are on pace to have it almost completely gone by the time I'd start school next fall. The fact that I'm looking at public schools in lower-cost cities coupled with my wife's job which allows her to make decent money just about anywhere should help us continue to pay bills while I go to school. I will need loans (don't have the numbers for scholarship $), but won't let that stop me.

Is anyone else facing a similar situation?

Ideally, our credit card debt will be gone by the time I start, but we'll still have a car payment, rent, my wife's student loans, the usual stuff. I'm completely ignorant about financial aid constraints - I was fortunate enough to have my UG paid for. In the event my wife's income isn't enough to cover all expenses, can loans be applied to help cover living expenses? Would my wife's income adversely affect the amount of aid available to me?

Any other thoughts about debt and beginning LS are welcome, of course.

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...so this is what I've been wrestling with. I'm not sure where best to post it, but I figured the place where most people could relate to my situation is here on the Non-Trad board.

I'm nearly 30, have been working for 7 years, and am applying for admission to LS in Fall 2008.

I hear everything about how time-consuming law school is, and I also hear how even more time-consuming being an attorney is. I get it. Besides, to get just about anywhere in any profession, you need to work long-ass hours. I get that, too.

But in starting law school will life as I know it really be over? I have other pursuits in life necessary for my happiness. Playing music, mountain-biking, spending time with my wife and dog. Is that seriously all going to end if I get into law?

With my background and abilities, I genuinely feel pointed towards a legal career. More than anything, I feel I have some good and interesting work to do. But is giving up everything else I love necessary to doing that good and interesting work?

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Recommendations / Recommender Not a Good Writer
« on: September 11, 2007, 11:28:40 AM »
I'm a non-trad, been working for 6 years since finishing undergrad. Obviously, an employer letter should be in the mix to talk about how awesome I've been in the years since college.

Here's the rub, though: A former boss who can best speak to my abilities is not the greatest writer. He may even be a little dyslexic, I'm not sure. He's more than willing to write an LoR, and I'm sure it would be glowing. But would a badly written LoR reflect poorly on me? Logically, I hope it wouldn't... But what would an adcomm think? I wish there was a way to get my boss to make sure he has somebody proof this letter for him. I'd like to think he will, but I can't exactly ask him to mix in a proofreader

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Non-Traditional Students / How/When to Ask Current Boss for LOR
« on: August 21, 2007, 03:59:32 PM »
I know there's a whole sub-board for LORs, but I thought I'd hit up my fellow nontrads with this question.

I'd like to ask my current boss for a LOR, but how best to go about asking? You know, without sounding like: "Hey, I like this job and everything, but I plan on ditching you in about a year." I do work in a field with quick turnover (higher ed. fundraising), however, so it's not like she's expecting me to be here for years and years. But still, it seems a little awkward.

Shower me with your wisdom. :)

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Law School Applications / Rock and Roll Law School?
« on: June 14, 2006, 09:05:20 PM »
I cross-posted this in the Non-Traditional forum, but want to get a broader perspective as well.

Hey Everyone,

I'm 28, just took the LSAT and am beginning to prepare my application materials this summer/fall.

Anyway, I've read a lot about the "soft" qualities of an application being a real strength for the non-traditional student. I've got a few experiences that help me stand out, but I'm wondering how they'll play as part of my application/resume/personal statement.

Basically, in addition to some other professional experience, I spent several years in a major city working in radio and playing bass in a band. We had some minor interest from a record label and did a little touring; Nothing anywhere near the big-time, but it gave me a LOT of nitty-gritty insight into the music/recording industries and really piqued my interest in entertainment law.

So, I've got a UGPA of 3.0 (which rose steadily after a rocky freshman year), at a highly competitive SUNY school and an LSAT score in what I imagine will be the low- to mid-160s. I'm not expecting to get into NYU or anything, but I'd be curious to hear peoples' insight and feedback on my experience in the music business being looked on favorably or unfavorably as part of my background.

I think it helps make me unique, but at the same time, I can see some conservative legal types on an AdComm thinking of someone who made a real effort at being a pro musician as immature, not cut out for law school, etc...

Any or all thoughts are much appreciated. Thanks!

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Non-Traditional Students / Rock and Roll Law School?
« on: June 14, 2006, 04:57:09 PM »
Hey Everyone,

This forum in particular has given me a lot of great food for thought as I'm 28, just took the LSAT and am beginning to prepare my application materials this summer/fall.

Anyway, I've read a lot about the "soft" qualities of an application being a real strength for the non-traditional student. I've got a few experiences that help me stand out, but I'm wondering how they'll play as part of my application/resume/personal statement.

Basically, in addition to some other professional experience, I spent several years in a major city working in radio and playing bass in a band. We had some minor interest from a record label and did a little touring; Nothing anywhere near the big-time, but it gave me a LOT of nitty-gritty insight into the music/recording industries and really piqued my interest in entertainment law.

So, I've got a UGPA of 3.0 (which rose steadily after a rocky freshman year), at a highly competitive SUNY school and an LSAT score in what I imagine will be the low- to mid-160s. I'm not expecting to get into NYU or anything, but I'd be curious to hear peoples' insight and feedback on my experience in the music business being looked on favorably or unfavorably as part of my background. I think it helps make me unique, but at the same time, I can see some conservative legal types on an AdComm thinking someone who played in a band is an immature loser, user and abuser. (I am reasonably confident that I possess none of those qualities.  :) )

Any or all thoughts are much appreciated. Thanks!

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