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Messages - slp

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1
Stetson / need an LSAT tutor
« on: July 02, 2005, 08:29:05 AM »
Hello Stetson, Anyone interested in private tutoring?  I need to increase my score for the LSAT.  I scored in the 150's and need to do better.  I live close by your campus in Gulfport.  If interested, PM me.  Thanks!

2
I have a baby under one year of age.  I decided to wait until he was two and go for law in fall of 2006.  Then the option is to go part-time work and part-time school if I want to ever see my baby.  I would say have the baby first and see how u manage full-time work and the baby before adding law school to the mix.  Anotehr option is just attend school part-time and not work at all and put your baby in part-time daycare so u will have time to study.  I thought about going to work full-time and school part-time with a baby.  Once you have a child and you are gone 40 + hours on the job and then you are gone about 3 or 4 hours four nights a week, you will not see much of your child.  He will be asleep when u are home and I hvent even included study time into the mix.  Realistically, if you just want to have an offspring and have someone else in the family do most of the upbringing, then it is feasible.  If you think you will become sad that you never see your baby while other mothers out there are spending time with their kids, then rethink it. There really is no trued ideal way ...you do what works for you and your family.  I just think you will ahve a better idea of what to do if you have the baby first and then decide if you want to do law school/work fulltime.  Some would say working full-time andhaving ababy is crazy enough. 

3
Stetson / Re: Anyone attending Stetson out there??
« on: April 14, 2005, 11:50:02 AM »
If you want to live close to the Gulfport campus, stay in St. Petersburg.  There are nice areas southeast of the area.  A lot of folks who live there can be vey ingnorant to the areas.  That area is hit or miss.  Some ares are very nice and then you go a block and it is seedy.  If you have any specific questions about areas, I can help.  Also, get in touch with Caldwell Realty in Gulfport, they can give u a renter's list.  Living up on Gandy is almost 30 min away but it is a good central place if u want to get to Tampa. 

Some nice areas include the West St. Pete area by the mall, the Pinellas Point area in south St. Pete-a lot of folks are unaware of this area...very nice.

HTH

4
Minority Topics / Re: name and ethnicity don't match up
« on: November 16, 2006, 08:18:50 PM »
I am of East Indian descent but had a very Euro first and last name because my family is one of the few Indians who happen to be Christian.  I was born in India and I checked the appropriate box.  I got inot my choice school, no drama.  Adcomm won't think anything of it. 

5
Financial Aid / Re: Financial wizards, your advice is needed!
« on: May 19, 2006, 01:12:01 PM »
If you use up all your reserves for school and do not have at least enough to get a donwpayment, it will be harder to get a home and u will have to start saving again.  I think it would not be a bad idea to use some for school expense but have enough set aside so taht when u do go up for a home loan, u arent coming in with no money for downpayment or closing costs.  I know there are special programs and such that will take zero down, but why risk having only one avenue to secure that home loan. 
I had a slightly different experience to draw from.  When I got out of school, I could have spent all of my money I  saved to pay down my student loans.  Instead I used the few bucks I had to secure my first mortgage.  My student loans area at a decent rate,  and now I have a hosue that I would not have had if I did not buy when I did with the money I saved. You dont need any collateral or credit history to get that Stafford loan, but u need to prove yourself for the home loan and so that is where I would set aside my savings toward.  The previous poster's idea of having a small house/condo now is also a good one. 

6
Acceptances / Re: Is Temple really in a bad area?
« on: April 28, 2006, 12:27:55 PM »
To the poster who was wondering wheterh to keep the "junky" car versus leasing another one....my friend who had the battery stolen drove a "junky" car.  Car parts hold value whether u have a new car or an old clunker.  But I must add, she parked on the street.  As for being carjacked, I never even worried about that.  Of course u want to lock ure doors when u are driving (common sense).  The university as a whole has come a long way in the short 10 years since I graduated.  They ahve increased parking on-campus and security is plentiful.  When I was there, lack of security was a big issue and we had a "crime wave" on campus.   am glad to know things have changed for the better.  Definitely pay for parking and request an escort from campus police if u feel uncomfortable.  I thinkk the dealwith Temple is, you will have a rude awakening if u are used to a laid back, small town where everyone leaves their doors unlocked.  be aware of ure surroundings.  In my 4 years there, i was never mugged, physically attacked or had anyting stolen.  And yes, i did go out at night and sometimes alone.   

7
Acceptances / Re: Is Temple really in a bad area?
« on: April 25, 2006, 10:51:55 AM »
I was living on campus as an undergrad 10 years ago at Temple. Cars on the campus were not safe even when in the parking lots. Crack addicts would break in for as little as a few coins spotted in your car.  My friend had her battery stolen out of her car twice.  Hardly any of my friends kept their cars on campus on a regular basis.  we used mass transit and cabs most of the time. 
But, I have to say, the school has come a LOOONG way since 1996.  Myabe they have parking garages now or better on-campus security.  I loved Temple despite these issues and would go in a heartbeat to Temple Law if I wasn't already settled down with a family in Florida. I would not live near the area, but the school is so easily accessible  and I acutally enjoyed my 4 years there. 

One thing about Temple, u either really like ot or abhor it.  I strongly suggest a visit.  You can't go midline with this school. 

8
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Stetson
« on: April 11, 2006, 09:26:09 AM »
Stetson is a beautiful campus that was once an upscale resort in the 1920's era.  The buildings are stucco with tile top roofs...very Mediterranean.  I thought the Open House was a bit lengthy because some of the information was already mentioned at their law school info day programs.  the room we were in had uncomfortable seats, but generally  it was a positive experience.  if your goal is to settle in the area, Stetson is a good choice.  The majority of attorneys I have come into contact with are all Stetson grads and all seem proud that they went to Stetson.  The neighborhood to the south is basically condos and gated community that face the water.  If you go West from the campus, eventually you hit water as well.  The school is located in Gulfport, which is pretty much a laid back seaside town just west of St. Petersburg.  Feel free to PM me if you have any other questions. 

9
Minority Topics / Re: Very Low LSAT
« on: April 08, 2006, 09:02:45 PM »
You will have to be more flexible about where you will apply.  Tier 4 schools are getting more competitive, but htere are always schools in Thier 4 that will seriously consider you.  It also depends on where in the 140's you scored.  I think a good option is to take a prep class or get a tutor and take the test again.  SOme schools will tahke the highest score and others will consider the higher score even if they say they average, provided that your next score is a big leap from your last.
Since the LSAT scores do not stay on the record for application purposes, you will at least be able to move on from the low scores ehne they drop off. 

10
Minority Topics / Re: just curious as to why asians aren't URM
« on: March 15, 2006, 03:06:32 PM »
I asked a similar question a few months back about why Indians were not considered URM.  I was of course accused of trying to get URM when I was not deserving of it and so on.  Interestingly enough I have found that while Asians as a whole are not considered to be URM by people becaue of their "success" in education and in income levels, I think schools look at you on a case by case basis. 
For example, not only am I of Indian descent, but my family comes from a very modest background.   Neither of my parents had college education and for the first few years they struggled immensely chasing the American dream.  It was a struggle for them and a huge sacrifice to educate me and my siblings.  We had to do without a lot of things that I am not going to get into too much detail in this post.

But what I am saying is that despite these obstacles, I was still able to motivate myself and build a career, buy a house (on my own), have a family, etc.  When writing my personal statement, Iwrote about   my obstacles and how I overcame them.  I feelt aht this set me apart from from the stereo typical son or daughter of Dr. Patel or Dr. Singh whose parents had decent English speaking skills and had the financial resources where they were not disadvantaged to the extent that other Asians were.   
Maybe that is the problem here.  Everytime someone hears Indian or Chineses, they automatically assume that they are all cut from the same cloth. 
I think the schools look at diversity and will consider you based on their needs and whether you have something distinct to offer.  if you are Asian, you have to substantiate what makes you special from the rest of the bunch.  If there is significant life experiences, i do believe that it is noticed. 

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