Law School Discussion

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Messages - anxious

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There was more to my decision than just rank and money.  Location was a HUGE factor.  The school I chose offered more money and was in the metropolitan area that I was born and raised in.  Since I expect to practice in this geographic location after I graduate, this made the most sense even though the other school was ranked higher.  Moreover, my girlfriend of 8 years had a very good job in this location.  Since we plan on getting married soon, I didn't want to force her to adjust her career plans for mine.

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"Understand that Law School is nothing like undergrad work. Your Law Studies will be all consuming of your time. There will be no time for anything but study and school."

I partially disagree.  I am going to be a 2L at a Tier 1 law school (though not top 10).  It's very true that law school and undergrad are completely different.  In undergrad you could get away with just sitting in class very passively and still receive the best grade.  And in law school, you will be studying MUCH more than you ever did in undergrad.  Your typical night of studying in law school might even be more than your typical night of studying during Finals in undergrad. 

Regardless, you WILL have time for other things besides study and school...unless you're one of those really paranoid students who spends every waking moment buried in a casebook not getting to know classmates and making friends.  There are ample opportunities to have fun in law school.  One night a week I made sure I didn't study past 9 PM.  And on weekends, I'd wake up early to get all my studying done before the sun went down.  That way, I had afternoons and evenings to spend with my girlfriend.  I even had enough time to work out on a regular basis.  I've never been as fit as I am now and that's because in law school, you have to create your own schedule.  You fit things in that you want to fit in.  If you don't want to do anything but study, then that's how you'll prepare your schedule.  But if you want a life, you can have that, too.  In the beginning it'll be difficult to gauge how much time you can spend on different things because everything is so new.  But as you get used to your studying patterns and your abilities, you can start to shift your schedule around to better suit your needs.  It all depends on your priorities and how you schedule things. 

Then again, this is what worked for me.  Different things work for different people. 

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General board for soon-to-be 1Ls / Re: Just Read Turow's One L
« on: June 21, 2005, 06:35:40 PM »
Wow.  I haven't been here since a year ago when I was a soon-to-be 1L.  Now that my first year is over, I can easily say that reading any of these books is useless.  One L scares you too much.  Law school is MUCH easier than many of these types of books portray them to be.  Don't get me wrong, law school can be a scary place if you choose to make it scary, but many people are there together, with no clue how the process really works, and so they all help each other out through those tough times.  Sure there are hardships, but it's law school, it's supposed to be hard at times.  The best thing to do now is to relax and enjoy your free time.  It's going to be a LONG time before you get any more down time like this.  Once law school starts, you're up and running at a fast pace and as soon as you know it, you're a 2L. 

Hey Anxious, why don't you describe your typical weekly schedule for us?  How many hours did you spend in class, outlining, reading, at the library, working out, drinking, getting laid, etc?  And where do you go to school?

My typical weekly schedule changed as time passed.  In the beginning, because EVERYONE seemed smart and ready to tackle all law school obstacles, I spent the majority of my time reading at the library.  Eventually, I found out I could be a much more efficient reader at home.  Soon enough though, you learn your own rhythm.  Some people read in between every class, before class, and after class late into the night.  I opted to keep my sanity.  I read between classes and before class if class begun after 9 AM.  After class, I'd hit the gym (probably 4 or 5 times a week), then have dinner, then read.  Luckily for me, I live with my girlfriend who is wonderful!  She cooked all my meals, packed them up for me if I needed to stay at school, cleaned up our apartment, took care of bills and chores, made $$$, and provided some much-needed relief/intimacy during some stressful times even at really odd times of the day and night. 

I can't really tell you how much time you'll spend doing each of the things you listed because it varies widely depending on your priorities.  I was never a really big drinker so I ended up not having much time to drink.  Well, except on Thursday evenings.  But other than that, I rarely ever had alcohol.  There are some things that are unintentionally sacrificed, though.  For example, I ended up going to law school closer to my hometown, which I haven't lived near since 8 years earlier.  Yet I rarely saw my family or friends.  Most of my time was spent with other law students or my girlfriend. 

Point is - if it's a priority in your life, you'll find time for it.  If not, it'll fall by the wayside temporarily.  Law school does take up a LOT of time, but you'll still definitely have time to do other things with your life. 

Oh and as for school, I'm at a tier 1 school on the West Coast (not top 10, though). 

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General board for soon-to-be 1Ls / Re: Just Read Turow's One L
« on: June 21, 2005, 04:53:58 PM »
Wow.  I haven't been here since a year ago when I was a soon-to-be 1L.  Now that my first year is over, I can easily say that reading any of these books is useless.  One L scares you too much.  Law school is MUCH easier than many of these types of books portray them to be.  Don't get me wrong, law school can be a scary place if you choose to make it scary, but many people are there together, with no clue how the process really works, and so they all help each other out through those tough times.  Sure there are hardships, but it's law school, it's supposed to be hard at times.  The best thing to do now is to relax and enjoy your free time.  It's going to be a LONG time before you get any more down time like this.  Once law school starts, you're up and running at a fast pace and as soon as you know it, you're a 2L. 

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Where should I go next fall? / Re: did i apply way too late
« on: January 11, 2004, 07:10:53 AM »
I think it depends on what your scores are.  If they are excellent, then I wouldn't worry....if they are more mediocre, then the best time to have applied was late October/early November.   My GPA was great, but my LSAT score wasn't too hot, so I was finished with my applications by mid-November.  However, there are application deadlines for a reason, so as long as you apply within the deadline, you're not hurt too badly - though you may be informed later than others since yours came in later. 

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Where should I go next fall? / Re: Southern California Law Schools
« on: January 11, 2004, 07:02:46 AM »
I'm a Californian here applying to those same SoCal schools.  I was going to apply to Chapman (which is a Tier III, last time I checked) however I heard the same thing regarding the fact that it was new so I decided against applying there.  And I had the same regretful experience regarding the LSAT.  Although I did purchase study aids, I did not use them as much as I should have and when I did, I was not very focused.  So.....although I had a 3.68 GPA from a UC, I ended up with a 153 on the LSAT.  I'm hoping schools will put a greater emphasis on the score that reflects four years of work and dedication, rather than on the score that shows 1 test taken on 1 day.  I'm skeptical though.  I wish us all some much needed luck....

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