Law School Discussion

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Messages - BadAdviceTagger

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1
Retaking them doesnt matter...they will appear in your transcript and thus be calculated by LSAC for a completely different (and presumably much lower) GPA then what your school would give you (if you were to retake them).  That said, retaking them and getting As will give you more classes towards your GPA and somewhat reduce the impact on the LSAC GPA.  Best plan is to get as many A's as possible from now on.

Law schools look positively at hard science coursework however...I think you should remain in bio, as potential IP students seem to receive better acceptances and scholarships.  Furthermore, dont do Law as an undergrad, despite your life plan...what's important is to major in a subject you like and that will inflate your GPA. (unless its hard science, in which case do the best you can...electrical engineering, bio, physics, comp science etc...I say this because I presume that since you initially had a bio major you have some interest in the sciences.)

Also...start studying for LSAT! Make it second nature!

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Wait List / Re: WL dilemma(s)
« on: May 02, 2008, 03:17:28 PM »
You can send in letters and whatnot, but your best bet would be to move to Nashville and demonstrate that you will attend Vandy at a moments notice (which will probably be your best bet).

3
Pre-Law in high school / Re: History Undergrad Major...and more
« on: April 13, 2008, 02:57:44 AM »
First of all, you can disregard a lot of these comments because I can tell that you're smart and ambitious.  I was sitting in your place only a few years ago, and, God willing, I'll be attending one of those shiny "top" law schools in the fall.  (Hint: Hyde Park.)  When I was your age, I had a feeling that a legal career would be right for me.  Was my gut feeling correct?  Possibly not.  But I'm going with my intuition and my perception of my aptitudes.

I've tried to be a poet, a guitarist, a music critic, and, now, I want to be a top-flight clerk, helping an important judge draft opinions.  Will it happen?  I hope so, but possibly (even probably) not.  The important thing, however, is that you have a dream, which you can always modify in a way commensurate with the realities of your future situation.  Don't let anyone tell you that it's too early to start planning, because the early-planners are usually the most ready to capitalize on the system.  While all of your friends will be disregarding that minor "F" they received in a PolSci class they forgot to drop, you'll know that such a mark will be a scarlet letter on any LS applications, jeopardizing your acceptance to a top school.  (LSAC averages all of your grades, including community college courses, which means that two "F"s from Harper could sink your application.)

Now, to answer your questions:

1) If you're set on law school, major in a subject which will produce the highest GPA and reduce your debt load as much as possible.  The double major sounds frivolous unless you're set on Academia.  Even in the real world, few employers will care about whether you studied Religion in addition to, say, Mathematics.  They'll judge your interview and your pedigree -- regardless of GPA in some cases.  Since you're living in, presumably, Chicago, it's best to go state: UIC or Urbana-Champaign will open a lot of local doors without the hefty price tag of the expensive private schools.  I have a friend at the latter school who loves it.

FYI, I studied a discipline which I deeply loved, and my GPA reflected that passion.

2) Start thinking about the LSAT.  I can tell that you're done some preliminary research since you've mentioned that crucible of entrance tests, but delve deeper into the exam.  Take a diagnostic.  Look at the sections and ask yourself whether you can excel at them, or whether you're willing to put forth the effort to do so.  Above all, Law Schools look at your GPA and LSAT.  

That's it.  I'm not kidding.  A high GPA and a high LSAT score will ensure an acceptance at a top school.  A 3.8 GPA from UIC and a 172 on the LSAT will probably send you to Georgetown with a scholarship.  Law School admissions is mostly a numbers-game.

Good luck, and feel free to send me a private message if you have any questions.

4
General Off-Topic Board / Re: ITT Post Horrible Advice
« on: April 09, 2008, 03:22:05 PM »
Always tell your partner WHY sex with your ex was so awesome and felt better than with him/her.  They will want to improve to please you and will be glad you told them.

5
Law School Applications / Re: Does everyone have good/great soft factors?
« on: February 29, 2008, 10:15:46 PM »
They call them soft factors for a reason.  They are not hard factors.  I feel like the deleted scenes on dvds are overrated.  They delete those scenes for a reason.  They weren't good enough to make it into the film.  Soft factors are like that.  Its really a numbers game and the soft factors are the extra features of your application.  Some are cooler than others but they really aren't the reason you buy the dvd.

6
Law School Applications / Re: Does everyone have good/great soft factors?
« on: February 29, 2008, 10:13:10 PM »
They call them soft factors for a reason.  They are not hard factors.  I feel like the deleted scenes on dvds are overrated.  They delete those scenes for a reason.  They weren't good enough to make it into the film.  Soft factors are like that.  Its really a numbers game and the soft factors are the extra features of your application.  Some are cooler than others but they really aren't the reason you buy the dvd.

7
Law School Applications / Re: Rate my chances, quick and painless
« on: February 25, 2008, 02:14:33 PM »
I predict you will get into all of these schools.

8
seriously with a gpa of 3.97, i doubt that you are stupid.  i also think that you have to be quite hardworking to be able to get that kind of grades.  assuming reasonably that you are not stupid and that you are hardworking, scoring in the 160s is actually very easy i think.  scoring in the 170s might require a lot of work, but its worth it because with a 3.97 gpa and a 170+ score, you are pretty much a lock in many t14s.  so my point is.  study for the lsat, and by studying i don't mean just blindly read all the material available out there, but really strategically tailor your study plan.

this is a link to some advice on how to score above a 160:
http://www.top-law-schools.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=396

after that, this is a link to how to score above a 165:
http://www.lsatdiscussion.com/index.php/topic,1341.0.html

seriously, scoring in the 160s is not that hard.  my first diag is a 145.  didn't really speak english until 16.  i took the lsat when i was 22.  i score 165+, a couple points below my lowest preptest score.  again, 160 is not hard at all.

9
General Off-Topic Board / Re: Do you have an alt?
« on: February 20, 2008, 01:37:24 PM »
^ lol, blah!

technically, you all have alts because you keep starting your post counts over starting from zero. in all technical terms, this action alone qualifies an alt as existing

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General Off-Topic Board / Re: Do you have an alt?
« on: February 20, 2008, 12:55:50 PM »
I used to think I was way too cool for an alt.  Now I have like 5

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