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Messages - The Knight

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1
3L job search / Re: Is it Acceptable to Round Your GPA on a Resume?
« on: August 17, 2008, 05:56:04 PM »
I think that it is also important to consider how much of a train wreck transcripts can be. 

As an extreme example I attended five universities (one out of the country) throughout my undergraduate career.  Three of the schools used a +/- system, one of them used a straight letter system, and the foreign school used a mix of pass-fail, ABC and satisfactory-exceptional marks.  Two different degrees earned at the same time, over 165 hours of classes, have made my transcript an alphabet soup of As, Bs, Cs, Ds, Fs, Ts, S, Us, etc.  Well, no Ds anyway...*chuckle*

Depending on how you calculate my GPA it can be anywhere from 3.1 to 3.4.  LSAC reported it as 3.30, my undergrad institution reported it as 3.23.  I usually go conservative with 3.2.  If a firm wants to call me out on it over something so trivial, f-em.  It's a GPA, not a personality disorder.

It's pretty easy to lose sight of how unimportant a 3.3 vs. a 3.4 is in the real world.  I don't know any attorneys who would give a sh!t.

There's a bit plenty of difference between undergrad GPA importance and law school GPA importance. 
I was speaking for undergraduate GPA only.  Law School GPAs seem very finite and subject to scrutiny.

2
3L job search / Re: Is it Acceptable to Round Your GPA on a Resume?
« on: August 15, 2008, 11:46:48 PM »
I think that it is also important to consider how much of a train wreck transcripts can be. 

As an extreme example I attended five universities (one out of the country) throughout my undergraduate career.  Three of the schools used a +/- system, one of them used a straight letter system, and the foreign school used a mix of pass-fail, ABC and satisfactory-exceptional marks.  Two different degrees earned at the same time, over 165 hours of classes, have made my transcript an alphabet soup of As, Bs, Cs, Ds, Fs, Ts, S, Us, etc.  Well, no Ds anyway...*chuckle*

Depending on how you calculate my GPA it can be anywhere from 3.1 to 3.4.  LSAC reported it as 3.30, my undergrad institution reported it as 3.23.  I usually go conservative with 3.2.  If a firm wants to call me out on it over something so trivial, f-em.  It's a GPA, not a personality disorder.

It's pretty easy to lose sight of how unimportant a 3.3 vs. a 3.4 is in the real world.  I don't know any attorneys who would give a sh!t.

3
Studying and Exam Taking / Re: Free Law School Outlines
« on: August 13, 2008, 09:35:22 PM »
tiz-ag

4
General Board / Re: Firm Social Life: Necessary Sports Knowledge?
« on: July 13, 2008, 05:12:06 PM »
Why not just be true to yourself? If you don't like organized sports than why try to learn about them just to fit in? Or, if you do have an interest than just start watching the games and it will start to click.

Quoted from above:
I know very little about Major League Baseball, the National Basketball Association, the National Hockey League, and the National Football League.  I tend to prefer college sports when I watch or view go to a game.  However, I tire of not being (at least a little bit) knowledgeable about the major professional sports leagues/teams.

5
General Board / Re: Fifth Tier Toilet
« on: July 13, 2008, 11:48:31 AM »
Law schools should be like Med Schools/Business schools. Capped at a certain point.

Bingo. I think it's silly to blame the demand side (the students). It's silly to suggest that "too many people want to be lawyers" is the problem. Sure, everyone wants to go to law school nowadays, and with the few requirements, prerequisites, and little pre-qualification needed to go to law school...what do ya know, everyone's applying to law school. But guess what? Everyone wants to be a doctor, too. I bet many people on this board were pre-med, once upon a time. There are tons of people out there who dream about becoming a doctor (myself included). But guess what? You have to take some pre-med courses. You have to have a solid GPA, and you have to do above-average on the MCATs. In other words, there are more pre-qualification requirements for you to become a doctor. So even though everyone dreams about becoming a doctor, the entry requirements to enter this profession are waaaay higher than the requirements to go to law school. So don't blame the students and their dreams. They aren't the problem. The problem is the law schools that are popping up everywhere, and are allowing people with lower GPAs and lower LSATs to enter the legal profession. And man, what do ya know, there are a bunch of under qualified people entering law school, many of whom end up being unhappy, making measly salaries, and $100k+ in debt. The medical profession filters out these individuals with stricter pre-qualification entry requirements. No matter how much you dreamed of becoming a doctor, if you weren't good enough, and you won't become a doctor. The bar is lower in the legal profession. And that, I believe, is part of the problem.

This isn't true.

6
You are still paying for that guy's dermatology appointment through your health insurance premiums. The money is still gone before it reaches your bank account, and a good bit is still wasted on administrative costs.




Please kill yourself.

7
General Board / Firm Social Life: Necessary Sports Knowledge?
« on: July 13, 2008, 11:41:21 AM »
I'm going to make a confession here: I know very little about Major League Baseball, the National Basketball Association, the National Hockey League, and the National Football League.  I tend to prefer college sports when I watch or view go to a game.  However, I tire of not being (at least a little bit) knowledgeable about the major professional sports leagues/teams.

As professional sports tend to be a common topic in firm life I'd like some suggestions on places to learn more about professional sports and common topics related to them.  I realize that ESPN.com is a great place to start, but I feel like my eyes are being raped when I look at their webpage; it's simply so much information at once. 

I realize that some of these questions may sound childish, but I didn't really grow up in a heavy sports environment.  Soccer was really big in my high school, and my undergraduate school didn't have a football team.  The law school that I will be attending has a football team (a pretty good one), and like I said, I know a good deal about college ball.  However, when I start doing firm interviews and someone asks me "Yankees or Mets?" I want to be able to at least bull a little bit about the teams. 

With all that being said, is it more common to have one team that you know everything about, or a general knowledge of the league?  I assume it is similar to college ball: you have a team you really like and you know which other teams you really want them to kick the poo out of.  Also, some favorite players (ex. White and Slayton for WVU), some least favorite players (White and Slayton for WVU), and what they are known for (running the ball and then dropping it, constantly).

If all this is too general then just some advice on where to start a little bit of research would be awesome.

Thanks!

8
General Board / Re: Fifth Tier Toilet
« on: July 11, 2008, 10:23:19 PM »
Matthies, you apparently don't understand how a message board works.

In every post I read of yours, you make rational sense, and advocate for personal responsibility, and take things as case by case, and tend to view things as mutable and flexible and dependent on individual circumstances.

That's now how message boards work.  Here's the deal.  Pick an ideology and stick with it.  Here are a few popular ones.  t14 or die.  biglaw or die.  all top schools grads make billions.  all TTTXMNLOP grads eat ramen.

You're missing the picture here man.  Stop making sense, and start making blanket generalizations, ok?

Glad we had this talk.

I also tire of Matthies' constant objectivity and clever/interesting/knowledgeable posts.  I am currently considering a halt to my cyber-stalking of Matthies in protest.  I would feel much better if we could at least get an "OMG ONOEZskyisfalling-omnomnomnom.com" or two out of Matthies.  Otherwise the only logical choice left would be to continue to submit to his horrible litany of well though-out responses.

9
General Board / Re: The End of the World
« on: July 07, 2008, 09:02:20 PM »
What do you think?

well, if/when the socialist Barack Obama becomes president [long political rant edited out for your enjoyment]

but no seriously, if Julie Fern was president of the US.... now then we would all be really screwed
I'm glad I wasn't the only one thinking about posting the same thing.

10
General Board / Re: MAC or PC?!?!
« on: May 19, 2008, 12:52:56 PM »
keyboards are reasonably easy to replace on dell laptops.  if you find a computer-savvy friend who you trust, they should be able to figure it out.  my dell laptop's "I" key died and i bought a new keyboard online for $40 and switched it myself, and there are a lot of things i wouldn't/couldn't do to my computer on my own.

I've replaced the keyboards on both a Dell Inspiron and a Gateway W7xx.  It is very easy to do.  You'll need a few screw drivers (flat and phillips, at least two sizes of each type), the internet, and about an hour and a half for someone who hasn't ever done it before.  Google your model number or a 'how to replace a keyboard' for your laptop.  If you don't have another computer to surf with while you're working make sure to print off all the material you'll need.  I'd also get a few Q-tips and some rubbing alcohol/water to clean the inside of your machine while you have the top up.  Make sure to get behind the ears; they like that.

Just to end with a humorous keyboard story...When I was in undergrad I was a pretty clean guy.  However, I had a tendency to go on six hour organic chemistry binge study sessions full of snack foods.  Needless to say that my (Frankenstein Dell) Desktop's keyboard was always packed with crumbs.  I didn't have a deep sink in my dormroom.  So, once a week when I cleaned my bathroom I would unplug my keyboard and put it in my newly cleaned toilet, squirt some dish soap down into it, and use the toilet brush to really go to town on the sucker.  I still use the keyboard on one of my old networked desktops.  It still types like a dream after countless cans of Coke being spilt on it, and untold bags of chips being consumed over it.

*chuckle* Rereading this post I imagine some 300 pound slob rubbing feces from his toilet on his keyboard.  Looks like I'm a winner.

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