Law School Discussion

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Wunjin

Pages: [1] 2 3 4
1
Studying for the LSAT / registration deadline
« on: October 29, 2007, 03:49:06 PM »
The deadline for december is october 30 but does that mean tonight at midnight or midnight on october 30th?

2
Studying for the LSAT / Re: What caused the recent scale change?
« on: October 07, 2007, 11:01:00 PM »
nothing much.  pubs source all evil, including v.d.  glad see you catching on.

Why do you always speak in fragmented sentences?

3
Studying for the LSAT / December 06 Scale
« on: October 01, 2007, 01:12:05 AM »
Do you guys remember a scale in recent LSAT history that was more generous than that from December 2006?  I'm just curious to know how generous the one for the September 2007 test could possibly be, because I didn't really think that the LSAT from December of 06 was particularly hard.

4
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Study group?
« on: July 02, 2007, 02:07:37 PM »
Yep.  I'm still interested, but the forum format would be better for me because my availability is a bit weird, so I can't promise to be online when everybody else is.

5
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Ultimate setups guide
« on: July 02, 2007, 01:34:42 PM »
Is it really worth buying this book if you already have the LG bible?

I doubt it. Get through the bible first and then see how you're scoring. If you find you're getting perfect or almost perfect then I wouldn't bother. If there's still room for improvement, you may find it useful.

The issues that I have are primarly related to time, and taking contrapositives/ related inferences into account.

Not sure what level you're starting from, but here's what I found helpful:

-Write out any rules you can AND their contrapositives (use symbols which are easiest for you to understand of course)
-Add as many rules to your sketch as you can - including entities that cannot go in a certain group or slot
-Make as many deductions as you can BEFORE starting the question (usually, there are certain exceptions to this rule)
-Use prior answers (acceptabilty questions can be very useful for eliminating answers in subsequent question) -- this is risky, but if you are confident the answer is right, it can save you a lot of time

Timing issues can be solved with lots of practice. In the long run, spending extra time making sure your set up, rules and deductions are correct can save you lots of time with the questions (and help you avoid silly mistakes). Once you've done MANY MANY sections, I don't think timing will be an issue. I must have spent 50+ hours learning logic games. I'd redo ones I had trouble with until I got them perfect. I went from getting 30% right to 95-100% right. It takes lots of practice but they can become your easiest section. Hope this helps. MSG me if you have any questions.

Last night I redid the logic games section of the June LSAT and I missed 5 questions, and that's include a couple silly mistakes that weren't related to my understanding of logic games.  For the most part, I'm not bad at logic games, it's just a timing thing.  There are a few rare types of abstract logic games that throw me off, but for the most part I'm not bad.  I want to make DAMN sure that come September, I'm not missing more than about 2  or 3 per section.  I've already accepted that this may be my weakest link, but even still I want to do quite well on them.

6
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Ultimate setups guide
« on: July 02, 2007, 12:30:29 PM »
Is it really worth buying this book if you already have the LG bible?

I doubt it. Get through the bible first and then see how you're scoring. If you find you're getting perfect or almost perfect then I wouldn't bother. If there's still room for improvement, you may find it useful.

The issues that I have are primarly related to time, and taking contrapositives/ related inferences into account.

7
Studying for the LSAT / Ultimate setups guide
« on: July 02, 2007, 12:03:38 PM »
Is it really worth buying this book if you already have the LG bible?

8
Studying for the LSAT / Re: So this is odd...
« on: July 02, 2007, 11:01:01 AM »
So why do you need a 170?  Low GPA?  The reason I ask is your list doesn't exactly require a 170.

That being said, I'm sure she is being disappointed with you and not at you.  Chin up, a 166 is nothing to sneeze at.

I have a low gpa (3.29) so I need a 170 for BU and BC.

No, you don't.  Especially not for Boston University.

9
This is my first post on these boards but I've been lurking around here for about a month and would really appreciate yout input on my situation. I scored a 163 on the damn June Test. This is 5 points lower than my first (and worst) prep test and I averaged about a 172 in the dozen or so prep tests I took. I have a 3.5 GPA and had my heart set on schools like Michigan, UCLA, and Northwestern. I know my GPA is on the low end for those schools but I was hoping a 170+ score would counteract that enough to keep me competetive and I thought I could pull it off since I was consistantly scoring 170+ on practice tests. I'm worried that even if I re-take the test in September and score 170+ they will see both scores and figure that 170+ is the fluke since the 163 matches my gpa (both are about 90%). As far as I can see I have two options: I can either just retake the test and pray I hit less dumb luck and pray the they will ignore the lower LSAT score or I can put off law school for now. If I give on applying this cycle, I could take my senior year to boost up my GPA (hopefully to a 3.6) and could possible get a year or two work of experience and then apply again in the future. With a 3.5 GPA and a 163 LSAT as a white student with only decent soft factors, I wont get anywhere near the top 20 range which I know I am capable of. Would you recommend retaking in September or do I throw in the towel for this cycle and try again in a few years?

P.S. To everyone else who feels like they have had all their plans thrown out the window by bad luck, I feel you pain.


Retake.

Also, the scale didn't screw you. The test isn't luck. You have to own your life - achievements, disappointments and all. I can't stand people who avoid taking responsibility.

Throughout all the practice tests I've taken, I personally haven't really noticed (except perhaps in the games sections...and that was only one SOME tests)  tests getting harder as the scale got more forgiving.  So what do you call that?  I'm a person who does close to the same on just about every test, regardless of its objective "difficulty"...my numbers don't fluctuate wildly, so when a ridiculous scale comes along like the one we saw yesterday, what do you call that?  I got a bad draw on that one man, and I'm pissed off.  I didn't really think this test was any harder than the December 2006 test and the difference between those 2 scales is night and day.

10
Studying for the LSAT / Re: 159 - Retake?
« on: July 01, 2007, 06:22:07 PM »
When people say get their score in early, what does that really mean? By around what time would be suggested?


Ideally, you should have your apps in the first day (or week) they're accepted.  The earlier you apply, the greater your odds of admission.

You should also apply "early decision"  to a school you're sure you want to attend, and is a reasonably realistic shot. This will make an acceptance binding on you, but will also increase your odds of admission.

Just wanted to know because I'm going to have to take the September LSAT to get into my target schools.  So if I do really well and get my score back around the middle or perhaps 3 weeks into October then apply right after that, should that be early enough?


Well, if there's no question you'll need a higher score, I guess that'll have to do.  Otherwise, I would see if you can apply earlier, but have them hold off on final decisions until your new score is in.

Hm, I'll give that some thought.  But I think getting an application like 4 months early for a lot of these places HAS to early enough.  I'd do ED, but what happens if there is a school I really like and would love to attend, but I get a huge scholarship offer from another school that really causes me to second guess my first choice?  There is no one school out there that I would go into a ton of debt for if I had financially compelling offer from another school.


Then you probably shouldn't do ED. 

As for your other point, again, if you need a higher LSAT, you need a higher LSAT.  Otherwise, the earlier the better.  "early" is a relative term.  It's not really 4 months "early" just because it's 4 months before the deadline -- it's just 4 months before the deadline.  Not that that would be late at all -- it just wouldn't be as early.

(Check the early decision / early action deadlines for the schools you like -- that may give you a better idea of when's best to apply by.)


I'll do that.  But I really have some work to do for September ;)  Nothing like completely under performing on test day.

Pages: [1] 2 3 4