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Messages - yongsoo

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1
Acceptances / Re: SUFFOLK (BOSTON) vs. JOHN MARSHALL (CHICAGO)
« on: April 11, 2012, 02:37:48 PM »
Going to borrow a bit from a post about NESL:

If you want to work in Boston, you're going to face a steep uphill battle. In the Boston area, you have:
Harvard
Boston College
Boston University
Suffolk University
Northeastern University
New England School of Law
UMass Dartmouth (as of 2010) - though on the south shore, I imagine its grads would also look for work in Boston.

Those are just the MA law schools. Nevermind that many people may have attended UG in the area and may have gone on to high tiered schools but want to come back to Boston. Boston is a hard market to break into, if you don't have any ties to the area. Someone who went to Harvard, MIT or Wellesley and then went to an out of state Tier 1 law school, would probably be more competitive in the Boston area for firm jobs than someone who is only here to attend Suffolk. (NOTE: there are a LOT of universities/schools in the area where one may have spent his or her ug). Sounds elitist but that's the profession.

Many of the Suffolk grads I know who have law firm jobs, were those who attended the Suffolk night school and had decent day jobs. Many of the area's patent attorneys, for example, worked as patent agents or as scientists/engineers/etc. during the day. That being said, if you do well enough in school, I'm sure you can find a decent firm job or maybe a state clerkship.Just know that you'd be competing with the night school students with extended work experience and great networking opportunities.

In Chicago, you'd be competing with less schools in the direct vicinity, though you might as well consider Michigan and Wash U in the mix.
The question, I suppose, is "where do you want to live?" You will have a hard time going outside those schools' respective geographical locations.

Both are great cities. Chicago is nice in that O'Hare is right there, and when you inevitably want to get away from school, it's going to be a lot cheaper to fly out of Chicago than Boston. Not to mention, come the holidays, Logan Airport is a sea of students. On a similar note, during the school year, if you like studying at coffee shops, you'll be hard pressed to find available seating. Students fuel Boston's economy, and this is evident at any coffee shop/Panera (aka St. Louis Bread Company).

I'm a bit of a foodie and would opt for Boston over Chicago in that regard.
My advice to you would be to check out firm websites and attorney bios. Look for the grads and note their grades, prior work experience, and ug institution. If you find that the average grad of x school places better at the type of firm/job you want to be at, then roll with that school.

2
Acceptances / Re: New England Law Boston
« on: April 11, 2012, 02:18:38 PM »
If you want to work in MA in family law, small non-profs, or western/central MA, then NESL may be an option. If you want to work in Boston, you're going to face a steep uphill battle.

In the Boston area, you have:
Harvard
Boston College
Boston University
Suffolk University
Northeastern University
New England School of Law

UMass Dartmouth (as of 2010) - though on the south shore, I imagine its grads would also look for work in Boston.

Those are just the MA law schools. Nevermind that many people may have attended UG in the area and may have gone on to high tiered schools but want to come back to Boston. Boston is a hard market to break into, if you don't have any ties to the area. Someone who went to Harvard, MIT or Wellesley and then went to an out of state Tier 1 law school, would probably be more competitive in the Boston area for firm jobs than someone who is only here to attend NESL. It sounds elitist but that's the profession.

If you have a comfy job in India, I'd stay there as a lawyer. A lot of work is being outsourced to India, and the market is probably better there for it.

3
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Regent Law
« on: April 09, 2012, 01:02:04 PM »

4
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Regent Law
« on: April 02, 2012, 12:03:03 PM »
I hear it has education style learning in a school type environment.

5
Tulane let in a convicted murderer. So, I'd think you'd be ok there.
http://abovethelaw.com/2011/09/new-tulane-1l-is-an-advocate-a-writer-and-a-murderer/

6
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Can SLU get me to the east coast?
« on: July 28, 2011, 10:27:36 AM »
Wow, it's been awhile since I visited this board, but it's a slow day at work, so I'll help out. I can't speak for the NY area, but I'll give you my insights into Boston.

I'm originally from the St. Louis area (pm me if you want to know my high school) and am currently working in Boston. I know a few people who went to SLU law and then moved to Boston. From what I understand, they weren't too successful and have since moved back.

The problem is that the Boston area is inundated with law schools. Suffolk, Northeastern, BU, BC, New England School of Law, and Harvard. From what I understand, the UMass system has recently announced that they will be opening up a law school. That's seven schools' worth of graduates with whom you would be competing. Granted, Harvard grads can go anywhere as well as a handful of BU and BC, but Suffolk and Northeastern are very local.

Moreover, it's hard to break into the Boston market if you don't have any ties to it. It's not nearly as bad as trying to break into the Stl market though.

If you do well at SLU (i.e. get top 1% as you imagine), then I would just transfer after your first year. But as people will undoubtedly emphasize, you cannot rely on transferring. If you want to stay in Stl but want to work in Boston or NY, then go to WUSTL. It places well in both cities.

Hope that helps.

7
Where should I go next fall? / Re: ABA v. Non-ABA Law School
« on: June 28, 2009, 12:33:21 PM »
My success as an attorney depends on me - not on whether I can get an ABA sticker on my BAR Card.... oh wait, there is no such thing. BTW - federal is federal regardless.

As many people have said, if you have not graduated from an ABA Approved school, you are not eligible to take the bar in many states. That ABA Approved "sticker" on your bar application keeps all doors open. Whereas, NON-ABA cuts out a lot of the US

http://www.abanet.org/legaled/publications/compguide2005/chart3.pdf

You can be ranked number 1 in your law school class, but that's not going to let you sit for the bar in Delaware. facts are facts regardless.

8
Where should I go next fall? / Re: SLU Or WashU?
« on: June 19, 2009, 09:36:48 PM »
yongsoo, how's the legal market in St. Louis though?  Do most St. Luis grads get attorney jobs or are they just like any other tier 3/2 graduates who are struggling to find attorney jobs? 

I couldn't speak for the class itself as I am not familiar with SLU"s OCI statistics. I have simply observed and briefly researched that many of the law firms in STL have SLU alum with very few WUSTL. The BigLaw and National firms probably employ about as many Wash U as SLU, but all the other law firms lean significantly to SLU.

If it makes any difference though, anyone can enter the Write on competition at Wash U, whereas SLU only allows the top 50%

9
Where should I go next fall? / Re: SLU Or WashU?
« on: June 15, 2009, 11:58:09 PM »
Time to qualify my answer, it seems

I'm a rising 3L at WUSTL. St. Louis firms hold a bias against Wash U. Why? because the JD from Wash U will carry you nationally. The JD from SLU is not as national. Some of my classmates were asked flat out "How do I know you're not going to summer here your 2L year and not come back?"

Look at the alumni in the St Louis area. Check BAMSL or the YLD of BAMSL. The majority of practicing lawyers are SLU alum. The network is huge. This doesn't mean that Wash U doesn't put people in STL firms, but we're more heavily scrutinized. Of course, that bias isn't surprising as very few of my classmates want to stay in St. Louis. Me, for instance.

The issue that arise with practicing in St. Louis is that you'll inevitably get barred in IL. At which point, what is keeping you from moving to Chicago?

If you want to stay in St. Louis, go to SLU. If you can get into both WUSTL and SLU, you'll probably get more $$ from SLU.

However, I will add this:
there is no reason to limit yourself regionally. You never know where life will take you.

10
Where should I go next fall? / Re: SLU Or WashU?
« on: June 11, 2009, 10:08:18 PM »
if you want to stay in St. Louis, go to SLU

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