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Messages - Benefactor

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1
Law School Admissions / Re: Texas ED
« on: August 15, 2009, 12:45:20 AM »
What were your numbers? Were you out of state like me?

Lower GPA but higher LSAT. Also out of state.

Also for what it's worth, their dual degree in Eastern European Studies/Russian studies really interests me...would it be a good idea to mention something like that in a PS?

If you're writing a Why Texas (or something like that), I'd mention the dual degree program for sure (as well as how it relates to your future career plans).


Was your LSAT above 170?

2
Law School Admissions / Re: Texas ED
« on: August 14, 2009, 10:14:36 PM »
By the way...my GPA is 3.43...I've been out of undergrad for a couple years and have decent soft factors (went on a scholastically related international trip, volunteer work etc.).  What do you guys think I'd need to get into Texas? 168 or so? I'm not talking to get my percentage in the 90's...just maybe into the 60's.

Also for what it's worth, their dual degree in Eastern European Studies/Russian studies really interests me...would it be a good idea to mention something like that in a PS?

3
Law School Admissions / Re: Texas ED
« on: August 14, 2009, 10:13:03 PM »
By the way...my GPA is 3.43...I've been out of undergrad for a couple years and have decent soft factors (went on a scholastically related international trip, volunteer work etc.).  What do you guys think I'd need to get into Texas? 168 or so? I'm not talking to get my percentage in the 90's...just maybe into the 60's.

4
Law School Admissions / Re: Texas ED
« on: August 14, 2009, 08:51:39 PM »
Applying ED to a school with non-binding ED/EA programs doesn't prevent you from being considered for scholarships because they still need to entice students to attend. From my own experience, I applied ED to UT and received a rather substantial scholarship still.

Good luck!

What were your numbers? Were you out of state like me?

5
Incoming 1Ls / Re: Dartmouth U
« on: April 04, 2007, 08:45:07 PM »
The motto is a reference to the Bible's John the Baptist as well as to the college's location on what was once the frontier of European settlement.

It's also improperly translated from the Latin. Technically is "The voice of one crying in the wilderness."

That still doesn't explain why the school's motto has no meaning.  Usually you get something like "truth", or "let there be light", the meanings of which are fairly obvious in an academic context...but this one has no meaning.  The least they could have done was made it like "educating one redskin (yes, i'm using this word on purpose) at a time".

6
Incoming 1Ls / Dartmouth U
« on: April 04, 2007, 03:17:52 PM »
What the @#!* kind of motto is that? The voice of one crying in the wilderness??

7
Incoming 1Ls / Re: Harvard Masters/J.D.
« on: April 03, 2007, 09:17:15 AM »
I have a peculiar situation on my hands. I'm a graduating senior at USC, with a 3.8 LSAC GPA, planning to go to law school soon. Last semester, however, a professor of mine convinced me to pursue a Masters in Islamic Studies at Harvard, and surely enough, after applying to the Divinity School at Harvard, I received an acceptance letter. I'm very excited at the opportunity, but my situation is this:

The Harvard Masters in Islamic Studies is a 2 year program. This means I wouldn't enter Law school until Fall 2009 (hence I would be class of 2012) after I complete the program at Harvard. I am young (21), but I've always wanted to set on my career at around 25. Besides this, I couldn't really find any negatives.

The positive side to this is that HALF of my Masters degree at Harvard can be fulfilled through classes taken at ANY Harvard graduate school. Of course, this means I can take classes at Harvard Law School, which means I can obtain a letter of recommendation from a Harvard Law faculty member, and then possibly apply for a Joint Degree program (Masters + J.D.), or even if I was to complete my full 2 years, I could still apply to HLS or any other law school for that matter (my preference is to come back to California and go to either UCLA or Boalt Hall).

What do you all think? Harvard for 2 years and then law school, or take a year and go to LSE (spend LOTS of money) and obtain a Masters in Political Theory, after which I enter law school in 2008? Any help is appreciated!

Unless you wanna be on the history channel, what the hell is the purpose of a masters in islamic studies?

8
Studying for the LSAT / LR Section
« on: April 02, 2007, 01:32:56 PM »
I remember reading a few years back that the LSAC had begun to make the LR section somewhat easier.  I just was wondering if you guys know around what year that happened in.  I'm working on some PT's right now from about 2000, and I just want to know which side of these changes the 2000 tests fall on. Thanks.

9
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: USC, BU, or ND
« on: March 31, 2007, 07:04:41 AM »
Yes, and then there is that, the other extreme. I guess you'd give a similar response if someone said "I heard living at NYU is hectic and immersed in city life", to which you'd reply "You should go to school on the moon, it's relatively quiet and calm out there."

Now that a horse's corpse has been thoroughly desecrated, does anyone have any useful advice?

Were you worried about applying to Fordham/BC because they're Jesuit schools? No? Then why are you complaining about ND?

When did I ever complain about ND's religious affiliation? They can be affilaited, officially, with the Church of Nietzsche and I'm still not happy about a lack of diversity. Variegation in my learning experiences is, for both political, personal and other reasons, important to me.

To clear things up, here is a quote from the Princeton Review's Best 170 Law Schools entry on Notre Dame:

While Notre Dame may "attract students from all over, the student body is very homogenous: white, Catholic, and conservative on social issues." Many students call out for "more diversity" and not just ethnic diveristy, either. "This place needs more married students with kids, students with handicaps, and older people with life experience," says one student.

Contrasted, their entry on Fordham (which is, incidentally, in NYC if you didn't know... that makes a drastic difference in diversity, regardless of the school's religious affiliation):

The diverse student body at Fordham Law Schools reflects its urban environs. ... By all accounts, diversity is an asset to the educational experience, and "having these diverse perspectives in the classrooms have been tremendously beneficial."

Which was precisely the point I was trying to make. Your oversensitivity and delusional claims aside (I had actually never mentioned religious affiliation once, for instance) seem like they have more to do with your issues of being white (and apparently perceiving attacks on being so, even where they do not exist) then anything I said.

You should read their Insider's Guide for admitted students (like a 100+ page book they send).  It's also available on the admitted students site.  IMO the community sounds spectacular, and if you truly want a unique experience, NDLS might be just the place.

However, since it seems you want to end up in NY, I would advise you to go to Fordham.  I think ND is the most national of the schools you're considering; 44% of its students work in the east-north-central region (i.e. the northern midwest), and the rest disperse around the country's major markets pretty evenly.  USC sends 83% of its class to California firms, with only 2% in the mid-atlantic (NY and DC) markets.  Hope that helps.

First, not sure if mentioning "white sensibilities" counts as being a certified "racialist". It is amusing to note how many kids get so up-in-arms at this site at the mere mention of "white", whereas my original post was basically a straight paraphrase of what the Princeton Review itself said. I doubt the PR is in the business of advocating avoiding white people, yet that same language here, rather than indicate a desire of diversity on my behalf, is interpreted as an attack on being white. These are the same kids who get all up in arms about URMs, think diversity isn't worth all that much, etc. The now-familiar claims of reverse-racism against whites are laughable. Give me a break. ::)

Anyway, I had that packet, and read through it a bit, but haven't given it a more detailed read. I'll do that. The info on USC placement is really helpful... where are the numbers from? I was under the impression New York is the third places USC seeds to, ordered by frequency.

I'm sorry man, but you and the Princeton Review just completely lost me when they reported a student calling for more handicapped students....that's just f-in' retarded, no pun intended.  You know what we need here, Father O'Brien?! MORE STUDENTS IN WHEELCHAIRS!

10
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: USC, BU, or ND
« on: March 30, 2007, 04:41:26 PM »
I don't understand how that's not a valid concern. I don't want a school that's entirely homogeneous, especially in something I'm not. Diversity isn't a bad thing.

So what would you say, if I said, for example, that I didn't want to go to a school because they were way too damn many Asians?
Besides, if you don't like ethnically homogenous schools, then if you don't mind me asking, why the hell did you even apply to ND in the first place?  What did you expect from the flagship of all US Catholic universities?

I don't really see the argument you're trying to make, and you're a splendid troll, but sure, I'll bite. Firstly, I didn't say "I don't want to go to Notre Dame because there are way too many damn whites there", though your convenient paraphrasing does indicate how weak your argument is. But sure, if you said "I don't want to go to x school because it's nearly an all-Asian, or all-Black" or whatever, no, I don't think that would necessarily be racist. There is a big difference between not going to a school because of a group of people ("I refuse to go to a school with x people in it") and searching for diversity ("I want a school that has more than just x people in it").

There is a reason why schools spend so much time advertising their "diversity", and this is especially so for the top-rung schools. I have absolutely no desire to be engulfed in any homogeneity, but this is doubly so for what basically amounts to an all-white school, as whites are the majority in the United States as well. This apparently isn't only my issue, as the Princeton Review's "Best 170 Law Schools" quotes current ND students who call for more diversity.

Why did I apply to ND? Because it was free; I was given a fee waiver, saw that ranking wise it was a good law school, and decided to apply. Maybe you really want to go to ND and are upset that I applied/got in without knowing terribly much about the school? Don't worry, with your award winning character, I'm sure you'll get in. Sorry if I've offended your white sensibilities, but calm down: this is the internet, for one, and while your attempts to be an annoying troll are amusing, they're pretty pedestrian.

I never said you said "oh there are too many damn whites" I was making a point by making an analogy.  You didn't come right out and say there were too many whites, but you implied it by even bringing it up.  If it were a non-factor to you you would have never mentioned it.  Why do law schools advertise diversity? Probably because it's perceived as being good, but I'm not really convinced that it is.  They're after ethnic diversity, not diversity of thought.

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