Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.

Messages - UChi2L

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 42
1
Transferring / Re: Whent to Apply?
« on: October 21, 2007, 10:37:10 AM »
I would like to point out... that I don't need a single thing to consider whether or not I would like to apply to these schools.  All I was saying was that, if I were to decide to apply to transfer out of my school, the aforementioned schools would be the schools that I would possibly want to attend in lieu of my present school.  I wasn't trying to be snooty, and I am moderately offended at the harshness of your post. 

3. Get over yourself. You're not "considering" anything until you have at least 1 semester of grades in that merit even applying. If you do get good grades, I suggest you get beyond worrying about things like weather, student body, and the like. You can look at those things IF and WHEN you have multiple transfer acceptances in hand. The transfer application process can be as unpredictable as the regular application process. At every school, the top students think about transferring, especially as of late since there is much more talk about it than before. If you want to maximize your chances, apply to as many top schools as possible.
   

Please, this is a community where we all seek support and guidance.  Cattiness is neither welcome nor appreciated.  I am not sure exactly what I said that was so offensive, but I apologize.  Clearly, I am aware that in order to transfer to any top 15 school, I need to be at the top of my class.  That is simply a given.  Thanks so much for the information though, any feedback is greatly appreciated.     

I tend to agree with Brightline.  I've met dozens of people who have asked me for transfer advice before receiving grades, and it's incredibly foolish.  No matter how good your qualifications going into law school, you have no idea how you're going to do until you get grades.  A large part of performance in law school is made up of a totally unknown factor -- performance on law school exams.  You can prepare by learning the material, but not everyone does well, and you are far from guaranteed a spot at the top of the class.

I also think it's short sighted and foolish to start thinking about transferring before you know how you'll perform at your current school because you risk all of the bad things that come with not fully committing yourself to your school 1L year.  Make tons of friends, immerse yourself in the environment, and behave like you're going to go there for the next two and a half years and graduate with that degree.  Even if you do transfer, you should have a lot of pride in your old school, but it seems like you've already decided, in a way, that you're better than the school you're at (there's no other reason to look for information about transferring when it's not even remotely within the realm of possibility).  Relax a little, focus on your exams, and try to get something out of this year.  That'll be important whether or not you end up transferring.

2
Transferring / Re: Of course your LSAT score matters when transferring!
« on: August 27, 2007, 10:48:21 AM »
Harvard is different because it is one of the few schools that still considers LSAT and UGPA for transfers.

LSAT does not matter.  It is a predictor of law school performance.  Once you have actual law school performance, the LSAT is no longer a good/relevent predictor.

The vast majority of schools do not care about your LSAT.

Therein lies my point. If it did not matter, why don't we see more transfer students from Cooley or John Marshall or Widener at Yale, Stanford, Chicago and the like? If it did not matter, more schools would accept transfers that were #1 at their T4 over students in the top 10% at a T2.

LSAT matters only peripherally; schools are concerned about transfers' ability to fit in and handle the workload when they show up.  I went from a T3 to a t6, but they don't go much lower because they don't know that the first year curriculum at lower-ranked schools is sufficiently "rigorous" to prepare students for a top-tier legal education (which is often quite different in nature).  So the LSAT gets you into the first school, and your performance at the first school gets you into the second one, but new schools don't look at LSAT at all.  My LSAT was lower than the lowest LSAT ever admitted to my new school, but I got in and my grades at the new school are just as good as they were at my old one.  Law schools know that this happens, so they admit people who do well at schools that are good enough to prepare them adequately.

3
Transferring / Re: Transfering as a 2l
« on: August 27, 2007, 10:43:43 AM »
Feel free to send me a message

4
Transferring / Anyone heard from Chicago yet?
« on: July 12, 2007, 06:56:13 PM »
If so, let's hear it!

5
Transferring / Re: Advice Needed ASAP
« on: April 20, 2007, 08:48:40 AM »
If you can maintain that GPA, apply to Harvard.

6
Transferring / Re: Students Accepted GULC EA
« on: April 20, 2007, 08:47:44 AM »
Let me be conservative ...

They do SHOCKINGLY well.  I was just talking to my boyfriend about this very fact last night.  He was shocked at how incredible the firms were that the transfers got into.  They're also getting board positions on journals and getting fantastic grades.  You'll do fine.

7
Transferring / Re: Tranfer down?
« on: April 17, 2007, 08:57:29 AM »
thirded

8
Transferring / Re: transferring as a 3L?
« on: April 17, 2007, 08:57:07 AM »
No, most schools only allow you to transfer after 1L.  Visiting won't really help you other than to maybe make some connections, since your diploma will still come from your old school. 

I forget which poster it is now, but someone on here transfered after 2L, and had to give up a year of school (entered new school as a rising 2L).  This person is at a T14 now I think, so they thought it was worth it for them.

DON'T DO IT.

The only reason I did it was because I wanted to go into academia/the academic side of the law (appellate litigation) and it was made very clear to me that would be impossible from my old school (T3).  If it's more about opportunities than time/money, I can understand being tempted to make the same decision but you would have to have a really compelling reason for wanting to do it (like not ever being able to do the thing that made you want to go to law school in the first place) and be in a position where you were able to afford it (no family, not married, parents helping out at least a little with tuition).

As for whether I think it was worth it ... PM me if you need advice, there's no benefit in complaining on this board anymore.

10
Transferring / Re: National Jurist on Transferring
« on: April 11, 2007, 11:50:12 PM »
Reason #980324 why I don't give interviews

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 42