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Messages - Delusional

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General Board / Re: What does URM stand for?
« on: January 14, 2008, 06:06:23 PM »
I think underrepresented minority but I could be wrong?

Correct

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Here is what I recommend. I seem to remember that CALI had some lessons on legal writing - take those. Get yourself some books. I highly recommend the Red Book: A Manual on Legal Style by Bryan Garner (of Blacks Dictionary fame). It is an excellent stylebook; it covers the basics of grammar, punctuation, and style in legal writing. Its a sourcebook I turn to all the time to figure out when to capitalize this, use a : or a ; it also has some model documents like memos and opinion letters. Second, get the Aspen Handbook for Legal Writers: A Practical Reference by Deborah Bouchoux. This book has a good section on organization as well as chapters on memos, briefs and pleadings. Get a copy of Legal Writing: getting it Right and Getting it Written by Ray and Ramsfield. This great desktop reference covers just about everything from abbreviations to when to use effect or affect. Lastly if you really want to add that extra gloss, the Elements of Legal Style by Garner again. The nice thing is all these books are relatively short and designed for reference, so you can quickly find the answers to your questions as you are revising.


Good recs and I'd like to improve my writing 2 but I can't get all of these @ d moment.  Which of these would you say is a must have?

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General Board / Re: depressed w/ my situation...any words of wisdom?
« on: January 11, 2008, 08:59:28 PM »
I am so sorry to hear about what happened to you.  I know exactly what you are talking about.  You work your tail off and you know you can do it but for some reason, others just dont see it that way.  Take heart.  I dont have much words of wisdom to render.  The only thing I can say is that you have to be resilient at this time.  This is not the time to break down and give up.  if you do that, then all the hardwork you put in previously (heaven forbid) will all go to waste. As unreasonable as the program may seem, I would go ahead with it and just do it.  But you have to keep that fire burning.  You mentioned that you feel so weak inside.  That is understandable and it5s Ok for you to feel that way for a while.  But you must get back up, you must keep pushing no matter how hard it may seem.  Only you can see you, no matter how much you try to convince them otherwise about that program, they may not listen.  So take it as one step back, but make that step count in the future.  Do it but keep your fire, keep your resilience, keep tugging, there' no substitute for hardwork.  It 'll be fine, it may not seem like that at the moment but it will be worth it in the end.

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Studying and Exam Taking / Re: Future Interests - Can u answer these?
« on: December 25, 2007, 02:47:27 PM »
Alright, I know, I should prolly get a life since its xmas, but I like this stuff.  Hope I'm right. Here ya go!

1) O to A for life, then to B for the life of C.  B has a ____?

B has a life estate measured by Cs life.  Whenever C dies, Bs estate ends.  If B dies before C, the estate goes to Bs heirs until Cs death occurs.

2)  A to B for life, remainder to B's surviving children.  B's children have ___

Bs children have a contingent remainder in fee simple.  It is contingent on them surviving B when B dies.  Their interest is not vested just because they are born.  Their interest is vested only, and only if they are alive when B dies.  The class will also close on the death of B since B can have no more children after he dies. 
 
3)  T to B for life, then if B is survived by children, to such children; However, if B dies without children, then to C.


If B has no children and the conveyance occurs before statute of uses. A=?

The interest would still be valid despite the fact that B had no children @ the time of conveyance.  The children have a contingent remainder, contingent on surviving B.

If B has no children and it occurs after the statute of uses. A=? C=?

C has a springing executory interest because when B dies without children, instead of the land to revert to the grantor, it will spring to C. The interest to B's children would be destroyed because it will "shift" to C.

If B has 6 children, after the statute of uses. A=? B's kids=? C=?

Bs children will have a fee simple absolute, C gets nothing.[/b]

4) A to B for life, remainder to B's widow for life, remainder to C and his heirs. A is married to T.  Who has what?

B has a life estate, Bs widow has a life estate, C has a remainder in fee simple.  T gets nothing.

5) O to A for life, then to B for life, then to C and her heirs. Later, both B and C transfer their interests to D.  A=? D =?

A has a life estate, D has a life estate from the interest from B and a fee simple from the interest from C, and when D dies and the life estate ends, his heirs take the estate based on the fee simple interest conveyed from B.

6) O to A for life, and one day after A's death, to the heirs of A.  A=?

A has a life estate but the estate reverts back to the grantor for one day.  After that day, As heirs take in fee simple absolute.  (Springing executory interest.)

7) O to A for life, then if B graduates med school, to B for life, then to the heirs of A. Before B graduates, A transfers to C.  B=?

A has a life estate, B has a springing executory interest but this is weird because since A transferred his interest to C, then Bs interest becomes shifting because it will divest the grantee-C upon Bs graduation of medical school.   Regardless of all these jargon, on Bs death, As heirs take in fee simple absolute.  

8) O to A for life, remainder to the heirs of B.  O=? B's heirs =?

A has a life estate, Bs heirs have a remainder in fee simple absolute.

9) O to A for life, then if B survives A, to B and his heirs; otherwise to D and his heirs.  D=?

A has a life estate, B has a contingent remainder in fee simple absolute, D has an alternate contingent remainder in fee simple absolute.  Ds remainder is contingent on B not surviving A.

10) O to A for life, then to B and his heirs, but if B does not survive A, then to C and his heirs. C=?

A has a life estate, B has a fee simple absolute, C has a contingent remainder in fee simple absolute.

11) O to A for life, then if B marriages before A's death, to B for life, then to C and his heirs. B= ?  C =?

A has a life estate, B has a life estate and shifting executory interest since it cuts As estate short, C has a fee simple absolute.

12) O to A and his heirs, but if A dies without children surviving him, then to B and his heirs. A=? B=?

A has a life estate; B has a contingent remainder in fee simple.  Contingent on A dying without children.

13) O to A for life, then one year after A's death to B and his heirs. O=?

O has reversion.  B has a springing executory interest because it springs from the grantor, O, one year after As death.

14)  O to A for life, then to the first child of B to graduate med school. Who has what if the destructibility doctrine is in place? Who has what if it is not?

If at the time of As death, no child of B has graduated from Med school, the rule of destructibility of contingent remainders will render the interest to that child invalid.  If the rule was not in place, then at As death, the land reverts back to the grantor and Bs first child to graduate Med school has a springing executory interest.  

15) O to A and his heirs so long as the land is not used for commercial purposes, and if it is used for such purposes, then to B and his heirs.  O = ? B= ?

A has a fee simple determinable and upon the happening of the condition, B gets a fee simple absolute.  O, the grantor has nothing.

16) O to A for life, remainder to the first son of A to graduate from medical school and his heirs. A has no sons. O = ? A's sons =?

The estate reverts back to the grantor, O, As sons gets nothing (hell, he doesnt even have one!)

17) O to A for life, then one day after A's death, to the first son to graduate medical school. A's sons = ?

As sons have a springing executory interest in fee simple.

18) O to B for life, then to B's children for life, then upon the death of the last surviving child of B, to such grandkids who are living. B has no children at the time of conveyance. B's children's interest = ?

Just because B did not have children at the time of conveyance does not mean anything.  B is a measuring life, so wed have to wait until B dies before we determine if he had any children.  Their interest is a contingent remainder anyway because it is contingent on B dying with or without children before we can determine what happens to their interest.

19) O to A for the life of B, then to B's heirs.  Does the Rule in Shellie's case apply? Who has what?

The rule in Shelleys case does not apply.  It would apply only if the instrument said To B for life, then to Bs heirs but thats not what it says. 

A has a life estate measured by the life of B, when B dies, As estate ends and the estate goes to Bs heirs.  If A dies before B, As heirs get the life estate until B dies.
 

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1L job search / Personal IV to Open House
« on: December 25, 2007, 09:37:18 AM »
A big firm personally invited me to open house via phonecall. I can't make it since I have other engagements on the same day but I'm highly interested in the firm though. ' killing my chances if I call to tell them I wont be able to make it?

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