Law School Discussion

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West Coast School of Law is a correspondence law school located in Downey (LA), California. See www.westcsl.com for more info.  Frankly, it is not the school for everyone. It is not a computer based “interactive” study program. It is more of an old fashioned correspondence school. The school tells you what to study and provides you with a workbook which guides you through a method/course of study. Then you are literally on your own. Of course, there are tests to take.

WCSL works for people who are reasonably intelligent and HIGHLY motivated. If you have a good record of prior academic achievement (i.e., know for certainty that you can read & study well by yourself), and know that you do not need someone to prod you along in your studies, this school may work for you. I selected this school because it is inexpensive, and gives me everything I want and need -  a way to study on my own and qualify to take the CA General Bar Exam.

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West Coast School of Law

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Lots of comments about the CA Baby Bar.  Here is my comments & experience:

I know the pass rate for the CA baby bar is very low, but I passed the June 2006 exam on my first attempt and without taking any prep class. I say this not to demean those who do not pass or have to take the test multiple times to pass, but to let everyone know that IT REALLY IS NOT ALL THAT HARD TO PASS this exam, if you know some BASIC law and know how to take the test. 

From my experience, I have concluded that success on
passing the baby bar (and probably the Gen. bar as well) is not how many hours one studies law, but how they study what is likely to be tested on the bar.

I believe that many (if not most) students spend far too much time studying (especially reading!!)and not enough time concentrating on learning how to put what they do know on paper, under time constraints, and in a format that the bar examiners are looking for.

Here is what worked for me:

As for study time, I must admit that I barely studied the minimum 864 hours in my first year of correspondence law study. Prior to the baby bar I spent six days (about six hours per day) "refreshing" [i.e., going over what I had already memorized] my legal knowledge. That's it.

My advise to any new students who are interested in PASSING the baby
bar:

1. Obtain a good, concise outline of each subject that contains all the essential rules of law. Then, memorize the outline (yes, I did say MEMORIZE the outline - word for word. It's really not that hard if you take it in "chunks" and apply yourself);

2. Study past baby bar exams and see how those who scored well wrote their answers;

3. Write your answers like the "model" answers. If you have to, memorize passages from the model answers;

4. Practice writing essays under time constraints. I admit that I did not do this, but should have.

If you spend your time MEMORIZING basic legal rules, and know how the bar examiners want to see your answer, you should have no problems passing.






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