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Messages - coordinated tie

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1
General Board / Re: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea
« on: August 31, 2006, 09:50:04 PM »
Bell curve, S-curve, so many curves that I think I won't be able to remember their names ..

2
Wow, libor, a very interesting perspective!

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Studying and Exam Taking / SPEED IS LIFE; OR IS IT?
« on: August 31, 2006, 09:43:35 PM »

Within the armed forces only, it is also frequently prescribed as an anti-fatigue pill for pilots and other individuals in situations requiring vigilance and alertness.



Adderall (commercial amphetamine) 30mg tablets - used extensively by US fighter pilots

When Tom Cruise uttered those famous words in the Hollywood blockbuster, 'Top Gun': "I feel a need, a need for speed", he would not have known that his words had already been taken literally by the U.S. Air Force, in a way he could never have imagined. In the latest Jamie Doran documentary, 'the need for speed' exposes how the Pentagon has been issuing a concoction of mind-altering drugs to its soldiers and airmen, resulting in the deaths of allied forces, innocent civilians and, almost certainly, their own men.

Amphetamines, sedatives, anti-nerve agents, adrenaline and a whole variety of vaccines, including anthrax, make up a cocktail of chemicals banned by civilian authorities in the ordinary workplace, yet forced upon pilots flying multi-million dollar jets into combat and Special Forces soldiers operating behind enemy lines. In an extraordinary investigation, American military personnel speak for the first time to explain how they were used as guinea pigs in wars ranging from Panama, the Gulf, Bosnia, Afghanistan and right up until the recent conflict in Iraq. These are not dissidents, nor are they unpatriotic: they love their country and were ready to give their lives in its service. But they can no longer stand by and watch their comrades suffer as the Pentagon pushes more and more drugs onto the frontline.

"I guess I best remember it as almost paranoia. I had a dizziness; I wasnít falling over dizzy, but there was a little bit of a tumbling sensation going on. I felt paranoia where I was nervous and skittish about what was around me and what was happening. I wasnít in complete control." Steve Tait: Gulf War Hero "They made you ruthless, just utterly ruthless. I made decisions that I feel now I would not have made. I eliminated individuals that I considered to be a threat, that I would not normally have done." 'Mike': U.S. Special Forces: "A lot of times the fighter pilots say: 'speed is life, speed is life'; in this case, speed became death." Lt. Col Tom Heemstra: F-16 Squadron Cder "Many of the times, the sad part is that they canít tell if it was real or not. Thatís the part that is really frightening."

In this documentary, filmed at locations throughout the United States and Britain, we speak with a former White House 'Drugs Czar' who expresses grave concerns about the use of amphetamines in the military; we interview the man who, as Air Force Chief of Staff, banned the drugs as soon as he took over, only to see them re-introduced after his retirement; we follow the story of one pilot who sacrificed his career in pursuit of the truth; we feature the case of a 'ground' soldier who killed innocent civilians for reasons he cannot understand to this day. We explain how the 'voluntary' nature of dispensing these drugs makes legal nonsense and how the Pentagon may very well be breaking its own laws, to the detriment of its serving men and women; only to establish that, in reality, the U.S. military is a law unto itself. We discover that vital information on 'friendly fire' incidents, including the deaths of nine British soldiers in the Gulf War, has been withheld and we examine the true human costs of wars fought on drugs.

http://www.acftv.com/streaming/wmedia.asp?stream_id=1

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General Board / Re: Replace or Refill?
« on: August 31, 2006, 09:40:05 PM »
Refilling inkjet cartridges is not always an easy process. It can be very messy, in fact, and may not be worth the cost savings if you wind up ruining your nice white dress shirt. Make sure to cover your work surface with newspapers to prevent staining. Avoid overfilling, because getting ink on the printer's circuitry can interfere with the operation of the electronics and void a printer's warranty.

Some cartridges require cracking open the sealed lid or drilling through the cartridge top in order to inject ink. This is not a difficult task, but you do have to be careful not to damage the print cartridge while refilling it. Wear latex/rubber gloves, because it's almost impossible to avoid getting a little ink on your fingers.


Are you somewhat implying that the problems the other OP had with his printer were result of improper refilling of the cartridges?

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General Board / Re: Should I file Bankruptcy...
« on: August 31, 2006, 09:37:15 PM »
What has ChexSystems to do with what bbgun says?  ???

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General Board / Re: Law Schools To Avoid At All Costs!
« on: August 31, 2006, 09:31:20 PM »
You bet!

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