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Messages - nawwal

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Black Law Student Discussion Board / A black perspective on my PS and DS
« on: October 10, 2006, 05:05:08 PM »
Hello everyone,
i'm bi racial, and have finished writing my personal statement and diversity essay. Being that I talk about both aspects of my background I wanted to show my statement to various members of both communities to hear their thoughts.

I was wondering if someone here could comment on my personal statement and diversity essay, mostly for tone, for that gut feeling, positive of negative that you feel when you read it, what you think of the type of person i am, etc. please dont hold back.

if your willing, hit me up by pm or by responding to this thread.

thank you,
nawwal

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Personal Statement / My personal statement and diversity essay
« on: October 09, 2006, 06:02:52 PM »
Hey everyone,

I was wondering if anyone would read, comment my personal statement and diversity essay. If you are, please send me a message and I'll be happy to send it to you.

I'd really appreciate it,
All the best,
J.R.

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Affirmative Action / Re: I consider myself black but is AA meant for me?
« on: August 10, 2005, 01:36:43 PM »
No, I actually think nothing is better than AA, really. AA needs to go, it is something that is making racism continue in our society and more and more people are getting outraged that people that are less qualified, in some instances, are getting in on little than their skin color. now THAT is the not fair part of it.

Vinny, with all due respect - I think youíre full of it. Why? I don't know if AA needs to go or stay and I don't have the answers to all the paradoxes of this world or of this issue. However, I do know that AA is NOT responsible in anyway for racism. In my experiences I have found that White people feel entitled to things, and in my experiences, many feel that they are better then black people and MANY are racist and don't even realize it.

 Racism is a major disease in our society that permeates every level of society including its laws. AA is not responsible for that, America is. I don't know if AA is the solution to racism but I do know that its not the cause of it and I don't really think it fuels or creates new racism in our society. I think it gives people with existing prejudices a pretext and a cause to express their negative feelings towards minorities.


AA isn't perfect, but people like Vinny aren't giving any other alternative or suggestions for trying to correct over four hundred years of oppression and racial injustice. I have a white friend who argues that AA is wrong but is a strong advocate for reparations. He says when reparations come, AA will go. Well, I respect that - at least he is being constructive. So címon, lets say it like its, keep it real.

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Affirmative Action / Re: I consider myself black but is AA meant for me?
« on: August 09, 2005, 12:27:25 PM »

  I believe that the Black encounter with America is vast and diverse and that there is no monolithic Black experience. With that being said, I believe that my experiences of growing up as Black and Jewish, while is strange and different are still part of the larger black experience in this country.
 
  I go to a fairly good national university and frankly many, if not most, of the black folks here are of bi-racial, or upper\stable middle class backgrounds. Most of the people that come to our BSU or NAACP meetings are children of professionals or those of fairly stable middle class backgrounds. Yes, there are plenty of exceptions to that and there are certainly a large handful that come from the ghettos or entered through special programs designed for inner city youth - some make it and some don't but those that do really thrive. And another LARGE portion of black students are children of Haitian and African immigrants and NOT descendents of African-American slaves. Do they deserve AA, is AA about mending an historical injustice? Is it about diversity? Is it a form of reparations for the descendents of African slaves? Is it just for anyone who is black? If it's the latter then what is black? Am I not black? Is only my cousin in the ghetto of LA black?

   So what qualifies a regular black experience in this country? I was beaten up as a kid for being black\multiracial; I was called shvartza, n-word and brownie cake. And surprise, my family didn't have a lot of money going up. But I had highly educated parents, and I grew up around white middle class people and that gave me an edge - I realize that. So, yes, I didn't have it as bad as what you described or as my first cousins who live in the ghettos of LA, who lived through the riots the police brutality, in and out of gangs, and daily and continues racism, etc. My cousin never even had a chance. And I declare that he is one of the smartest people I know, he could have been anything. He is the victim of a racist America. Affirmative action wasn't even an option for him.

I didn't post my remarks because I wasn't sure what I am going to mark on my application - I already have decided. I posted my remarks to get a serious discussion going about this question in general.

Think about the type of person, white or black, who has the time, the money and the access to be on an internet site like this debating this topic or applying to law school. I think that to be able to do all these things one must have some sort of privilege that others aren't even able to access.

Anyhow, if anyone would be willing to read and comment on my personal statement - I would really appreciate it. If you are willing to read it - please send me a personal message and I'll reply back with it. I certainly don't want my essay to come across as pop_tart is suggestions, because that is sincerely in my heart not how I view it and because that would obviously be damaging.


I love how the law school application process helps people come to terms with their minority status.....

If you have to even question as to whether AA is applicable to you, I'd say the answer is no. I don't think it's the kind of thing you need help deciding on by posting to a message board. Either you know it's applicable, or it's not.

I also don't think being followed around in stores or "white women clutching their purses tighter" when they see you is strong enough evidence to cry discrimination, and how such "discrimination" has fueled your interest to study law - especially when compared to other folks who have experienced worse (i.e. unjustly arrested "for fitting a description", denied education opportunites due to economic hardship, acted as a translator for their parents because they were the only child old enough to comprehend both adult conversations fluently, etc etc).

So boo-hoo-hoo, your self esteem is shot because some white lady *allegedly* felt "uncomfortable" around you - I'm sure the same white lady might clutch her purse if she was around Marylin Manson or Eminem (had they never been famous). It wasn't like this white lady accused you of rape, and tried to have you killed - which is what happened in The Massie Affair: http://www.powells.com/cgi-bin/biblio?inkey=62-0670033995-0, or like she was Andrea Yates and you were one of the black (or black looking) guys she falsely accused of taking her kids. Yeah, those are extreme examples, but you get my point-- a clutched purse is bullsh*t when compared to the more serious issues and problems that exist.

Happy writing- hopefully your equivocation on your racial identity is and what it means to you won't shoot you in the foot as your write your statement. And I certainly hope it doesn't hint around the tone of "my mama's black, so give me a hand out"... the adcomm will see right through it. You might, however, be able to play up your diverse background by discussing your multi-ethnic background and how that has infulenced and shaped you as a person, etc etc.

Good luck.



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Affirmative Action / Re: I consider myself black but is AA meant for me?
« on: August 08, 2005, 07:39:36 PM »
 
 
Quote

Depends. If you look white, you're white. If you look like a minority you are a minority. Interesting story though. Write a statement about it.
Quote


I just did. Thank you for the tip. Anyone want to read it? I'd appreciate any comments anyone might have.


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Affirmative Action / I consider myself black but is AA meant for me?
« on: August 08, 2005, 04:02:15 PM »
I'd love to spice this conversation up a little bit.

I consider myself black but I have an interesting background that might disqualify me according to certain individuals. I'd be interested to hear other perspectives. My father is a white Jew, my mother is black, of African-American descent who converted to Judaism. I consider myself black and Jewish.  I was raised, for many years, in a mostly Jewish community. While we found most Jews to be the least prejudice group amongst white people, I still experienced racism. My family and I no longer live in that community but we all now experience the general racism common in America. I've been followed in stores because of my skin color, and white women tend to hold their purses a little bit tighter when I am around, etc. However, I do look bi-racial and I understand that I have had a completely different experience that what is stereotypically thought to be "normal" for the average black American. So I repeat, am I black? And if you think I am, do you think I deserve affirmative-action? If not, then for whom is affirmative action meant?

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Black Law Student Discussion Board / Re: Am I black?
« on: August 08, 2005, 03:46:32 PM »
I'd love to spice this conversation up a little bit.

I consider myself black but I have an interesting background that might disqualify me according to certain individuals. I'd be interested to hear other perspectives. My father is a white Jew, my mother is black, of African-American descent who converted to Judaism. I consider my self black and Jewish.  I was raised for many years in a mostly Jewish community. While we found most Jews to the least prejudice group of white people, I still experienced racism. My family and I no longer live in that community but we all experience the racism common in America. I've been followed in stores because of my skin color, and white women tend to hold their purses a little bit tighter when I am around. However, I do look bi-racial and I have had a completely different experience that what is stereotypically thought to be normal for black an average black American. So I repeat, am I black?

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