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Messages - annr

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Distance Education Law Schools / Re: Concord Law School
« on: August 20, 2004, 08:36:27 PM »
The folks at Concord were much more interested in when they'd be receiving my tuition check than anything else about me or my plans. When I expressed my misgivings about the high tuition, they actually suggested I take an equity loan out on my home to pay for it, and then called and emailed me relentlessly when I declined. Needless to say, I went with a different school.

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Studying and Exam Taking / Re: No time to for study aids
« on: August 19, 2004, 03:44:44 PM »
Unfortunately I don't have a tape player in my car (I'm eventually going to change my tapes into CD format), but for anyone who does I'd recommend the Sum & Substance lecture tapes you can find at most legal bookstores. I think you can even find them used at places like amazon.com and the like. Hope that helps!

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Studying and Exam Taking / Re: Exam question
« on: August 18, 2004, 02:51:49 PM »
Thanks for your thoughts! I'm actually working on this question as part of a take home exam, so I'm not sure how much I can really discuss this particular situation without feeling like I'm cheating! However, in this exam, the call of the question is simply to discuss D's liability to the various parties--hence my uncertainty about how much to include. With something that broad, would it be wise to include information on negligence after a discussion of trespass? In short, D threw an object in an intentional attempt to strike another person, but missed and succeeded instead in entering a nearby property and setting off a chain of events (object hitting other object, knocking over a candle, causing a fire, etc.) that resulted in substantial damage to the property. So my discussion revolves around how the intent can be transferred from the battery attempt to trespassing, and how once a trespass is established, a trespasser can be held liable for all the consequences of his or her trespass, no matter how far-reaching. In a situation such as this, should potential negligence even be addressed? Thank you for your help!

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Studying and Exam Taking / Exam question
« on: August 18, 2004, 02:39:49 AM »
Hi there:

I'm a 1L working on sample essay exams, and I'm a little confused about what to include and omit in some of my answers. One of my study guides warns never to include non-issues in an essay answer, but also warns never to forget potential ones. I'm aware of the whole "don't say anything you wouldn't say in front of a judge" guideline, but some of the essays seem a bit nebulous. For example, I'm working on one where there is clearly a case of trespassing (via transferred intent) which results in damage to the property. Although I feel confident that there is enough to prove this, should I also include a discussion about a potential negligence case? I ask because I've got this nagging comment in the back of my head from one of my study guides about how if there are five ways to prove liability and I only address three because I'm sure they'll succeed and they don't, then I've failed. Any ideas about this? Thanks!

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