Law School Discussion

LSAT Preparation => Studying for the LSAT => Topic started by: PNym on October 28, 2007, 12:50:42 AM

Title: Avoiding panic?
Post by: PNym on October 28, 2007, 12:50:42 AM
How do you avoid panic? When I do a preptest and I panic, I start forgetting to apply everything I've learned, and that's when I make a lot of mistakes.
Title: Re: Avoiding panic?
Post by: eventually on October 28, 2007, 01:03:55 AM
Drinking green tea may boost your memory and calm down your nerve.
Title: Re: Avoiding panic?
Post by: DerekShiHarvard on October 28, 2007, 11:38:06 AM
I think it is something that just comes with time and completing more and more preptests.
Title: Re: Avoiding panic?
Post by: EarlCat on October 28, 2007, 11:47:37 AM
Panic comes when things are out of our control.  Panic comes from the fact that you're approaching the test from a position of fear and submission rather than from power and choice.  You're probably telling yourself things like, "I HAVE to do well on the LSAT," or, "I HAVE to get into such-and-such law school."  It's as if someone has a gun to your head making you fear for your life.

Using phrases like "I HAVE to" is very counter-productive.  "I HAVE to" implies a threat.  It's really, "I have to OR ELSE..."  When your body encounters a threat, your fight-or-flight response kicks in (racing heart beat, sweat, shallow breathing...i.e. panic).  The fight-or-flight response is great for fighting off a cougar.  It's not so good for standardized testing.

What you need to realize and remind yourself is that you don't HAVE to take this test.  And if you take it, you don't HAVE to be perfect, or even close to it.  Yes, it's an important test.  Yes, it's going to do a lot to determine the course your future takes.  Yes, it's tough.  But it's not the extent of your life.  It's says nothing about who you are.  You're not going to die from a bad LSAT score.  No matter what happens--even if you fall short of your goal, even if you fail--you're going to be okay.

With a healthier perspective, you can approach the test from a position of power.  You can choose whether to even take the test.  Now, I'm assuming you want to go to law school.  Given this desire, you are in a position to choose to go--that is to CHOOSE to do the things that will allow you to attend law school.  You don't HAVE to take the LSAT (because you don't HAVE to go to law school), but--from a position of power and control over your actions--you can CHOOSE to take it.  And to the extent that you wish to do well on the LSAT, you will choose to study or take classes or work practice tests in pursuit of that goal.

With that in mind, when you approach your practice tests, you need to constantly remind yourself that it doesn't matter.  A low score isn't going to ruin you.  You're only doing it to practice and to gain information about where you need to focus your study.  It's all just part of the learning process.
Title: Re: Avoiding panic?
Post by: J_ on October 28, 2007, 12:05:04 PM
Great advice.  Thank you.
Title: Re: Avoiding panic?
Post by: PNym on October 28, 2007, 06:41:07 PM
Hey, thanks for the advice. I panicked when taking the 1st LR of June '06 last night, missing 9 problems. On the 2nd section, I missed 2, with one error coming where I had correctly prephrased TCR but didn't read closely enough at the answer choice I was picking.

It was scary how quickly I became unrattled. On my first diagnostic (Dec '05), I missed a total of 3 LR questions, so I'm capable of getting the majority of these answers right if I keep from panicking.
Title: Re: Avoiding panic?
Post by: lawness on October 28, 2007, 07:40:26 PM
Panic comes when things are out of our control.  Panic comes from the fact that you're approaching the test from a position of fear and submission rather than from power and choice.  You're probably telling yourself things like, "I HAVE to do well on the LSAT," or, "I HAVE to get into such-and-such law school."  It's as if someone has a gun to your head making you fear for your life.

Using phrases like "I HAVE to" is very counter-productive.  "I HAVE to" implies a threat.  It's really, "I have to OR ELSE..."  When your body encounters a threat, your fight-or-flight response kicks in (racing heart beat, sweat, shallow breathing...i.e. panic).  The fight-or-flight response is great for fighting off a cougar.  It's not so good for standardized testing.

What you need to realize and remind yourself is that you don't HAVE to take this test.  And if you take it, you don't HAVE to be perfect, or even close to it.  Yes, it's an important test.  Yes, it's going to do a lot to determine the course your future takes.  Yes, it's tough.  But it's not the extent of your life.  It's says nothing about who you are.  You're not going to die from a bad LSAT score.  No matter what happens--even if you fall short of your goal, even if you fail--you're going to be okay.

With a healthier perspective, you can approach the test from a position of power.  You can choose whether to even take the test.  Now, I'm assuming you want to go to law school.  Given this desire, you are in a position to choose to go--that is to CHOOSE to do the things that will allow you to attend law school.  You don't HAVE to take the LSAT (because you don't HAVE to go to law school), but--from a position of power and control over your actions--you can CHOOSE to take it.  And to the extent that you wish to do well on the LSAT, you will choose to study or take classes or work practice tests in pursuit of that goal.

With that in mind, when you approach your practice tests, you need to constantly remind yourself that it doesn't matter.  A low score isn't going to ruin you.  You're only doing it to practice and to gain information about where you need to focus your study.  It's all just part of the learning process.

Great post Earl Cat. I will take this one to heart.
Title: Re: Avoiding panic?
Post by: LSATstruggle on October 28, 2007, 09:58:18 PM
Valium works for me with Ginko Bolboka( spelling)

I am just focused on the test. And not worried about everything else.  The two mixed together also help me with driving . I usually  have road range. Now i just drive and ignore dumb people.
Title: Re: Avoiding panic?
Post by: AkhilAmar on October 28, 2007, 10:47:12 PM
Panic comes when things are out of our control.  Panic comes from the fact that you're approaching the test from a position of fear and submission rather than from power and choice.  You're probably telling yourself things like, "I HAVE to do well on the LSAT," or, "I HAVE to get into such-and-such law school."  It's as if someone has a gun to your head making you fear for your life.

Using phrases like "I HAVE to" is very counter-productive.  "I HAVE to" implies a threat.  It's really, "I have to OR ELSE..."  When your body encounters a threat, your fight-or-flight response kicks in (racing heart beat, sweat, shallow breathing...i.e. panic).  The fight-or-flight response is great for fighting off a cougar.  It's not so good for standardized testing.

What you need to realize and remind yourself is that you don't HAVE to take this test.  And if you take it, you don't HAVE to be perfect, or even close to it.  Yes, it's an important test.  Yes, it's going to do a lot to determine the course your future takes.  Yes, it's tough.  But it's not the extent of your life.  It's says nothing about who you are.  You're not going to die from a bad LSAT score.  No matter what happens--even if you fall short of your goal, even if you fail--you're going to be okay.

With a healthier perspective, you can approach the test from a position of power.  You can choose whether to even take the test.  Now, I'm assuming you want to go to law school.  Given this desire, you are in a position to choose to go--that is to CHOOSE to do the things that will allow you to attend law school.  You don't HAVE to take the LSAT (because you don't HAVE to go to law school), but--from a position of power and control over your actions--you can CHOOSE to take it.  And to the extent that you wish to do well on the LSAT, you will choose to study or take classes or work practice tests in pursuit of that goal.

With that in mind, when you approach your practice tests, you need to constantly remind yourself that it doesn't matter.  A low score isn't going to ruin you.  You're only doing it to practice and to gain information about where you need to focus your study.  It's all just part of the learning process.

One of the few posts on this website that has more substance than words.
Title: Re: Avoiding panic?
Post by: EarlCat on October 30, 2007, 11:03:18 AM
Unfortunately, TPR hasn't let me write any of their content.

The ideas about choice vs. have-to are largely inspired by Neil Fiore's "Conquering Procrastination" audiobook, which I highly recommend purchasing if test anxiety are big problems.
Title: Re: Avoiding panic?
Post by: EarlCat on October 30, 2007, 11:08:05 AM
Unfortunately, TPR hasn't let me write any of their content.

The ideas about choice vs. have-to are largely inspired by Neil Fiore's "Conquering Procrastination" audiobook, which I highly recommend purchasing if test anxiety are big problems.

This is a shame.  Their book was literally my worst LSAT-related purchase.  Even the Kaplan 180 trumped them in terms of helpful info.

Yeah, "Cracking the LSAT" needs to be pulled, IMHO.  I guess they keep putting it out because it keeps selling.  :(  The LSAT Workout is pretty good (better than 180), especially the games.
Title: Re: Avoiding panic?
Post by: K? on October 30, 2007, 12:52:27 PM
Quote
Yeah, "Cracking the LSAT" needs to be pulled, IMHO.  I guess they keep putting it out because it keeps selling.

Amen.  Biggest waste of my money in recent memory.